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Thread: Stasis X-Ray

  1. #1
    Mama Doe
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    Default Stasis X-Ray

    Hi everyone,

    I feel bad asking for advice because I'm not an active member on the forum anymore (lots of life stuff has been going on, but that's a whole other story). My poor Jellybean has just had an x-ray and I could really do with some advice and reassurance

    Last night I noticed that she was a little off colour. Hamilton has been an absolute terror this week - despite being 8 years old, he has 'spring fever' around this time every year, so poor Jelly has been chased around a lot, with lots of fur pulling and mounting. When I went to put them to bed, she was very edgy and grunting, and didn't want her nibble stick treat (Hamilton was chasing her when I came into the shed). Obviously my first thought went to stasis, so I offered her some bramble leaves, she ate them immediately and seemed happy enough. So I went to bed.

    This morning, she was scrunched up and seemed completely out of it. We brought her inside straight away and offered fluids and food. She drank lots of water but wasn't interested in the food. Feeling her stomach, it was quite hard, which concerned me. So I called the vets and we took her in. Vet was also concerned by the hard feeling of the stomach, so we had to go to the other practice for emergency x-rays. I was in tears thinking that she had a blockage.

    Well they just called up to say that the x-ray showed no physical blockage, just a lot of gas. They want to try giving her the usual medication/gut stimulants first, before going any further. They're keeping her in for an hour or so to monitor this. If she shows no improvement then she will have to go to the out of hours hospital for surgery.

    I have never experienced stasis this severe with my rabbits before, so I'm wondering if anyone else could advise me from their experience. Am I right in thinking that if it isn't a physical blockage, then the gas is decompressed out with a tube? Is this less risky/invasive than cutting out a physical blockage?

    Also, does anyone else experience their male rabbits getting randy at this time of year, despite being neutered? I feel now that I should have split them up, but it was intermittent, and I worried that separating them might cause stress in a different way.

    Thank you in advance as always for your support, and I'm sorry that I don't contribute here more often. You are all lovely people and I don't think I'd survive rabbit ownership without RU.

  2. #2
    Wise Old Thumper Bunny Buddy's Avatar
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    First thing I pick out from your questions - it is not standard procedure to "cut out" a physical blockage. Cutting rabbit intestines carries a very poor prognosis so the usual method is to "milk" the blockage along the gut until it's in a place where it can move along safely on its own/with the help of medication.

    A lot of the answers re risky will depend on the reason for the gas. A tube into the stomach to help the gas move upwards is less invasive than abdominal surgery but the prognosis will depend on the cause. Sometimes, when they do abdominal surgery they will insert a tube to ease the pressure of the gas in any case, so it could be both.

    It is very scary but even if it does come to surgery, in experienced hands there is still a lot of chance of a good outcome. I have had something like 80% survival rate.
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  3. #3
    Mama Doe
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bunny Buddy View Post
    First thing I pick out from your questions - it is not standard procedure to "cut out" a physical blockage. Cutting rabbit intestines carries a very poor prognosis so the usual method is to "milk" the blockage along the gut until it's in a place where it can move along safely on its own/with the help of medication.

    A lot of the answers re risky will depend on the reason for the gas. A tube into the stomach to help the gas move upwards is less invasive than abdominal surgery but the prognosis will depend on the cause. Sometimes, when they do abdominal surgery they will insert a tube to ease the pressure of the gas in any case, so it could be both.

    It is very scary but even if it does come to surgery, in experienced hands there is still a lot of chance of a good outcome. I have had something like 80% survival rate.
    Thank you for your response. That makes sense - sorry I don't know much about blockages at all, so imagined physical ones coming out with tweezers or something. I am relieved that this isn't the case anyway, although I am still terrified as to what the outcome will be.

  4. #4
    Wise Old Thumper
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    I've no experience with any of these procedures, but wanted to send lots of vibes for poor Jellybean.

  5. #5
    Mama Doe
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    Quote Originally Posted by Omi View Post
    I've no experience with any of these procedures, but wanted to send lots of vibes for poor Jellybean.
    Thank you Omi. I have never dealt with stasis this severe before, it is awful.

  6. #6
    Mama Doe
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    I have just spoken to the vet again, she has been given medication but it has been advised that we take her to the hospital. We are being given mixed messages because the vet told my partner earlier that there was no sign of a blockage in the x-ray, I have now been told that it can't be ruled out.

    We are on our way to pick her up and take her to the hospital now. I'm really losing hope that she's going to make it through this. All I can think now is what did I do wrong, and that I don't think I have the heart to take on any more bunnies in the future, I already feel heartbroken and am preparing myself for the worst.

  7. #7
    Forum Buddy Liz47's Avatar
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    I'm sorry, I have no experience of blockages but sending lots of vibes. Has she had her blood glucose checked? High levels are indicative of a blockage

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    Wise Old Thumper joey&boo's Avatar
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    aw I'm sorry Jellybean is so poorly- sending lots of vibes. I'm glad BB was able to answer your questions because I wasn't too sure on surgical intervention for gas. Hamilton being so humpy (even though he normally is in Spring) could have been a response to her feeling ill or she may have stopped eating so well because of it...bit of a chicken & egg situation. Spring fever is fairly common but with my buns its not been relentless in the way that its been when I've bonded some bunnies (Joey).

    Please don't feel bad asking for support here, its kind of the main purpose of the forum I'd have thought / hoped

    Really hope the surgery goes well for her. I think I've heard all the swelling with gas might make detecting a physical blockage more difficult, hence why they aren't ruling it out. Ask if you can chat to someone in a room at the hospital x

  9. #9
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    I would want a blood glucose check doing. It indicates what is going on.
    I would also hope for pain relief, IV fluids, gut stimulants and keep her warm.
    I wouldn't be happy about surgery except as a last resort.
    Did they say where the gas was building up?

  10. #10
    Wise Old Thumper InspectorMorse's Avatar
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    Hopefully the Vet will also check blood glucose levels. Gas in the intestines is common in cases of stasis. It does not only. Occur if there is a blockage. Hopefully ongoing meds and fluids via IV will be sufficient to get her better. Decompression of gas is only possible if it is the actual stomach that is bloated and surgery is a last resort.


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