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Thread: Visit to the vets

  1. #1
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    Default Visit to the vets

    Hi all,

    I will be taking my rabbit to the vets for the first time next week for a general health check. She hates being handled and I know this will be stressful for her.

    Do you have any tips on how to make the visit a success?

    Thank you

  2. #2
    Forum Buddy Pets mum's Avatar
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    I would start by putting the carrier in the bunny area so she gets used to it, maybe pop a few treats in, then it will be a positive experience going in there. Will you be going by car ? again maybe take bun on a couple of short journeys beforehand. Not sure if your vets allow you in with pets, but hoping they do, so bunny will have you there, and vet may be able to examine her in the carrier with the top off. Good luck, I'm sure it will fine
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  3. #3
    Warren Veteran KCG's Avatar
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    Frankly I don't know if there is anything that makes it easier my bunny is getting offended at me. That's why I treat him when he comes home, that's how we make up.

    But you have to let him get in and out of it a few days before he gets used to the bag. You can put treats in the bag, spend some time in it
    Loneliness is a deaf friend,
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  4. #4
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    Thank you both! That's some great tips. I am going to buy the carrier today and will let her go in and out of it and will buy treats for the day haha

  5. #5
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    I'm tending to use solid (plastic) carriers with a top opening door for rabbits. It's easier to lift them in and out at the vet, or they can be examined / injected in the carrier if they really can't be handled. Rabbits can hide at the back of carriers with just a front opening door, and getting them out can be awkward and not a good experience for the rabbit.

    I wouldn't use a soft (bag-like) carrier for a rabbit as they may chew their way out, and are at more risk from other animals eg curious dogs in the waiting room (when we are allowed to actually wait in a waiting room again).

    https://www.petplanet.co.uk/p15663/b...0aAiXUEALw_wcB

  6. #6
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    Thank you! Iím just back from the shops and bought a plastic carrier with a top and front opening 😊

  7. #7
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    Can I suggest you practice using the catches on the doors? Sometimes they may not be fastened properly when you pick up a loaded carrier.
    It's also useful if the bunny is used to the carrier and going into it - so maybe leave treats / pellets at the back with the door propped open.

  8. #8
    Wise Old Thumper joey&boo's Avatar
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    I've a top tip! Take a towel. Most rabbits will feel unstable on the consulting table so a towel helps them feel more secure. Most rabbit savvy vets will have a towel at the ready & the ability to burrito but just in case (I took my bun to a rabbit interested & knowledgeable vet in Skipton about 5 years ago - no towel !)

    Expect the vets to check eyes, teeth, ears, weight, hocks, listen to heart, be interested in their diet & lifestyle

  9. #9
    Warren Veteran bunny momma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shimmer View Post
    I'm tending to use solid (plastic) carriers with a top opening door for rabbits. It's easier to lift them in and out at the vet, or they can be examined / injected in the carrier if they really can't be handled. Rabbits can hide at the back of carriers with just a front opening door, and getting them out can be awkward and not a good experience for the rabbit.

    I wouldn't use a soft (bag-like) carrier for a rabbit as they may chew their way out, and are at more risk from other animals eg curious dogs in the waiting room (when we are allowed to actually wait in a waiting room again).

    https://www.petplanet.co.uk/p15663/b...0aAiXUEALw_wcB
    Good tip. I bought a carrier that opens both ways and top is preferred exit.
    Cover half with towel.
    Make sure vet knows bunny does not like handling and jumps, struggles,scratches or nips. I ask that they put baby scale on floor to weigh and even I keep carrier low when opening.

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