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Thread: Palliative care for an elderly rabbit

  1. #11
    Alpha Buck Zigzag's Avatar
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    Reading this with interest, as Zigzag is 11 and is now having difficulty keeping the weight on. X

  2. #12
    Warren Veteran tigerangel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boots View Post
    Oooo physiotherapy sounds intriguing, thank you! I don't suppose you're in London are you?! I'm also searching to see if there's an acupuncturist who does rabbits, as I imagine that might help too.

    I do keep the flat nice and toasty for her! But having read joey&boo's suggestion then maybe I'll try a snuggle safe in there with her and see if she wants it or not. Recently she's taken to lying in the sun, toasting her butt
    Alas no I’m in the Bath area, but my OH just googled for ‘rabbit physiotherapy’ and he called around a few places within a 20-30 minute drive to find someone who would do it Interestingly our (rabbit-savvy) vet said the stiffness felt like it was in his hip, but the physiotherapist said it feels more like it’s actually in his knee so we had a new angle to view it and I think she’s right that it’s in his knee, all his foot movement is coming from his ankle movement. She did some laser-thing on his knee as well as make suggestions so hopefully she will see a slight improvement when we go back next week

  3. #13
    Warren Veteran InspectorMorse's Avatar
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    I would contact the Beaumont to see if they offer Rabbit Physio or if they can recommend somewhere that does

    https://www.rvc.ac.uk/small-animal-v...ic-vet-service


    ‘’All war is a symptom of man’s failure as a thinking animal.”
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  4. #14
    Warren Scout Preitler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boots View Post
    Haha yes, she knows that when I'm close and the light comes on in the evening, it's time to hide That is a brilliant idea re mixing the meds into a treat! Do you have any tips on the right consistency and ensuring they eat all of it?
    I just use a little pellets so they eat all of it (his cuddlebun gets the same amount in her own dish at the same time), like about a heaped teaspoon (9 lbs rabbits), with a pinch of oatmeal, in a small dish so it doas soak up the few drops of water it needs to make it damp, and then some drops of oil on it because my boy is rather on the skinny side. Then the medicine on top.

    Reason I do this is that I think medicine on an emty stomach can give trouble more often than when it comes with some food.

  5. #15
    Mama Doe Boots's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Preitler View Post
    I just use a little pellets so they eat all of it (his cuddlebun gets the same amount in her own dish at the same time), like about a heaped teaspoon (9 lbs rabbits), with a pinch of oatmeal, in a small dish so it doas soak up the few drops of water it needs to make it damp, and then some drops of oil on it because my boy is rather on the skinny side. Then the medicine on top.

    Reason I do this is that I think medicine on an emty stomach can give trouble more often than when it comes with some food.
    You are my hero!!!

    I gave Illy her meds earlier via some crushed pellets with them dropped on top and she has hoovered it all up Hopefully now I won't be "mean medicine lady" if instead I give her her meds via the food from now on. Thank you again!!
    Chinook and Illy are my wonderful buns

    Crumpet and Elmo, you'll always be my best friends x

  6. #16
    Warren Veteran tigerangel's Avatar
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    So just to give a quick update:

    It cost £60 for the physiotherapy sessions. We’ve only had two, and we aren’t going to need any more. The exercises we were given to do at the first session have really made a difference at the second session only a week later. Smudge was noted as having ‘increased flexibility, and drastically increased symmetry in his balance’. We aren’t planning on any more sessions and will just carry on with the ones we were given to improve his quality of life for the remaining time he has left. The cost is quite high to do on a weekly basis and not sustainable for most people long-term, but for the two sessions he’s had and the improvement we’ve seen in him has been worth the cost for us.

  7. #17
    Wise Old Thumper joey&boo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigerangel View Post
    So just to give a quick update:

    It cost £60 for the physiotherapy sessions. We’ve only had two, and we aren’t going to need any more. The exercises we were given to do at the first session have really made a difference at the second session only a week later. Smudge was noted as having ‘increased flexibility, and drastically increased symmetry in his balance’. We aren’t planning on any more sessions and will just carry on with the ones we were given to improve his quality of life for the remaining time he has left. The cost is quite high to do on a weekly basis and not sustainable for most people long-term, but for the two sessions he’s had and the improvement we’ve seen in him has been worth the cost for us.
    This is an amazing update what brilliant results

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