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Thread: Is this good or bad tooth grinding?

  1. #1

    Default Is this good or bad tooth grinding?



    Hey, sorry if I am breaking any forum etiquette, first time posting.

    My male 3yo rabbit is making this noise while flopped. My other rabbit purrs her teeth when relaxed and having a stroke but it's much quieter + faster than this. Is this just his relaxed noise or is it the bad kind of tooth grinding?

    Thanks,
    Emma

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Agalychnis View Post


    Hey, sorry if I am breaking any forum etiquette, first time posting.

    My male 3yo rabbit is making this noise while flopped. My other rabbit purrs her teeth when relaxed and having a stroke but it's much quieter + faster than this. Is this just his relaxed noise or is it the bad kind of tooth grinding?

    Thanks,
    Emma
    Hard to tell from the audio, is he relaxed flopped or is he restless, shifting about then flopping down ? Is he behaving normally in every other way and eating, pooping, drinking and weeing OK ?


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  3. #3

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    He was napping in a loaf position, I put the recorder next to him which woke him up, then he flopped down. Eating, pooping etc is all ok, but he lost his companion last week so I'm wondering if it's emotional stress.

  4. #4
    Forum Buddy Craig 1965's Avatar
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    Default

    Hello and welcome. Following on from Jane's reply, and looking at your reply to that, here are my observations. Jane is absolutely spot on in guiding you towards other observations for your bunny. It's important to look at every other visual element of your rabbits regular behavior - eating normally, looking keen for food, pooping and weeing normally, even down to his body position.
    I support your view regarding emotional stress - rabbits grieve as we do. It could depend on the circumstances on the loss, but your rabbit needs to make sense and in his own way understand the sudden loss. That said, grinding teeth for grieving isn't one I am familar with. But certainly your rabbit may have some elements of behaviour over the loss so that needs to be carefully monitored.
    One thing you could do is spend some cuddle time with your rabbit and gently stroke him whilst carefully checking (during stroking) for any parts of your rabbit that he might be sensitive with? Start at the head and gently work down the spine, legs etc. generally speaking if your rabbit likes the stroking, his teeth with purr or chatter (my lionhead loves this), and the response is proviked through your stroking so you can then prove that the teeth chattering is one of contentment, not of pain. If your rabbit reacts or flinches, then perhaps there is discomfort somewhere that would require further investigation.
    From how you describe, your rabbit appears to be presenting as comfortable and relaxed. But there may be something like teeth or ears that might be causing discomfort and are difficult to diagnose without vetinary intervention.
    If in any doubt, then I would perhaps consider route one - and take your rabbit to see your vet, explaining the concern. Your vet should be able to perfrom a health check - teeth, ears, temperature and limb checks to see if there is anything they feel is wrong.
    You are the eyes and ears of your bunny - asking the forum here is a fantastic way to get support and advice and hopefully others will post their advice and help for you.
    I hope everything is ok for your rabbit - losing a partner bun is always traumatic and difficult.
    Craig xx
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  5. #5

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    The loss was very sudden, basically my mum was watching them free roam in the garden and went to answer the home phone + got distracted, in which time a fox killed Georgina. Casper was hiding under a chair, but it's a chair he usually sits under anyway, so we're not sure if he knew what was happening or not. I've been reading up on how to care for a rabbit who's lost their companion and I did read on rabbitcaretips that tooth grinding could be caused by grief (or a bunch of other things), not sure if I'm allowed to post links.
    Unfortunately Casper hates being stroked (Georgina was the one who loved snuggles!), though I did check him thoroughly after the fox and there was nothing visible, and he didn't react to anywhere being touched. I'm pretty sure he's not in physical pain as he's otherwise acting surprisingly normal. I'm on the fence about taking him to the vet as it absolutely traumatises him every time, and that was with Georgina next to him. I want to make things as calm and normal for him as possible so as not to stress him out.

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