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Thread: Aggressive bunny

  1. #1
    Warren Scout
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    Default Aggressive bunny

    I have a year old female rabbit called Bridget. She is being a absolute terror atm. Shes just been moved from a indoor cage into a 6ft x 4ft pen inside my animal shed. She has lots of toys a lovely house to hide in yet she constanly tries to get out she bites the pen bars and moves it also digs in her litter tray. She is also very aggressive she lunges , growls, scratches and bites me. Even attacks the side of the pen if im sweeping beside it. I cant even pick her up now without getting scratched. She does come out of pen and has free range in a big garden for a few hours a day. Will having her spayed stop all of this behaviour? I love her dearly but this behaviour is scaring me and i dont want a constant battle with her everyday. Any advise welcome.
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  2. #2
    Moderator Zoobec's Avatar
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    It’s likely that spaying will stop this behaviour, especially after her hormones have subsided, around 6-8 weeks post spay. Spaying is definitely recommended to remove the risk of cancer in that area which is very common in unspayed does. I’m sure that she is enjoying the extra space, however, the rwaf do recommend a minimum of 60 sq ft of space to be permanently available, more space will probably help with her being territorial.

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  3. #3
    Wise Old Thumper
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    Spaying and a friend (male neutered) will help her to be a "nicer" rabbit. Females need company so get her spayed and find a neutered male. Bonding will have to be done in a different territory as she sounds very territorial, some Rescues will do the bonding for you. Let us know how you get on.

  4. #4
    Warren Scout
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    What type of aftercare is needed for them after a spay? Can she go back into her setup straight away.
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  5. #5
    Wise Old Thumper
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    As long as everything is clean and there is nothing for her to jump on. She will need to be quiet when she comes back home and stitches are removed, if the rabbit hasn't already done that, 10 days later.

  6. #6
    Mama Doe binkyCodie's Avatar
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    a lot of vets these days either use dissolving stitches, or ones inside of the bunny so they can't be chewed. I've never had to have stitches taken out personally

    after spay, she will need pain medication for a few days. its recommended to not have her on straw or sawdust as a bedding, as this can irritate the wound and cause infection. you'll need to remove anything she can jump on for a few days, and let her rest. I know my vet recommends the rabbit is brought inside for a few days as it makes care easier, they can be kept warm with heat pads, and can be kept an eye on. but that differs person to person and in this weather, temp shouldn't be too much of an issue.

    the first 24 hours after a spay are crucial, they often will go downhill such as not eating, lack of poops or even be cold. if all goes well in those first 24hrs then you're out of the woods so to speak.

    with the correct pain medication, most do fine.

    she may also be sent home with gut stimulants, or if she refuses to eat gut stimulants may be required to get her eating again. after a spray or neuter, I always advocate offering them anything and everything to get them eating, within reason. a little bit of apple, hay, a little bit of carrot, herbs, veggies. during those first 24hrs, anything safe (for me, and if they've had it before) is on the table as eating is important.
    Snoopy : 14.02.15 - 12.05.17 [mini rex]👑Luna : 14.02.15 [rex]👑Orion : 21.10.17 [mini rex]

  7. #7
    Mama Doe tlcwrites's Avatar
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    After spaying, I would always have them indoors, where the weather is more ambient as they cannot regulate body temperature post-op. I've always kept in a small, clean space with easy access to food, water, and hay. It makes it a lot easier to monitor them as well. As already mentioned, pain relief is essential, as is getting them eating. You may also be offered a pack of recovery feed, which makes a paste of water and fibre. If she is being reluctant to eat, then syringe feeding this can help get something in her gut. My vet also sends post-operative rabbits home with Emeprid, a gut stimulant. Some really need it, but I've had others who practically start eating again the moment they are off the operating table.

    When puberty hit, my Elphie became a demon bun. She soon settled back to being a lovebug after her spay - and now she's 8.5.
    Last edited by tlcwrites; 01-07-2018 at 01:47 PM.
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