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Thread: 2 Pairs Aggression

  1. #1

    Default 2 Pairs Aggression

    Evening All,

    I've two bonded pairs now. The newer pair have built a good bond thus far.

    Now to the issue. When the new pair come home the hutches were close together but blocked off so they couldn't see each other but the doe from the older pair went nuts the day after and battered her bond. (I had to buddy them up a little after)

    I've had to move the hutches to opposite ends of the garden and I've built a divider and only give them a run a pair at a time which is working. Ideally I'd like to run them all at the same time on each side of their divide (in a dream world without a divide but don't hold much hope!)

    Any tips to get the doe to settle around the new buns?

    All my experience is 2 buns at a time, 4 is a whole new world!

  2. #2
    Wise Old Thumper
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    Sep 2005
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    134,707

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    Quote Originally Posted by belly View Post
    Evening All,

    I've two bonded pairs now. The newer pair have built a good bond thus far.

    Now to the issue. When the new pair come home the hutches were close together but blocked off so they couldn't see each other but the doe from the older pair went nuts the day after and battered her bond. (I had to buddy them up a little after)

    I've had to move the hutches to opposite ends of the garden and I've built a divider and only give them a run a pair at a time which is working. Ideally I'd like to run them all at the same time on each side of their divide (in a dream world without a divide but don't hold much hope!)

    Any tips to get the doe to settle around the new buns?

    All my experience is 2 buns at a time, 4 is a whole new world!
    Referred aggression is very common. Are all of your Rabbits neutered/spayed ?


    Twickenham Veterinary Surgery- A Rabbit Savvy small animal Veterinary Practice in SW London
    https://www.twickenhamvets.com/

    Keep up to date with the RHD2 situation in the UK. This highly respected Facebook page provides accurate and up-to-date information. Both the RWAF and some Rabbit Savvy Vets contribute to the page
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/1744958082388756/

  3. #3

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    Yep all have been done. The original doe is a rescue and come from a home with multiple bunnies so I find it odd she's suddenly like this.
    Last edited by belly; 11-06-2018 at 09:38 AM.

  4. #4
    Wise Old Thumper
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    Quote Originally Posted by belly View Post
    Yep all have been done. The original doe is a rescue and come from a home with multiple bunnies so I find it odd she's suddenly like this.
    Was she housed alone at the Rescue ? If so then she would not have any chance to show referred aggression.

    You are likely to need to work at desensitising her to the proximity of the other pair of Rabbits. By which I mean over a period of several months slowly get her used to smelling/hearing the other Rabbits but not seeing them. You may get the two pairs to run side by side if the divide in the run is solid, at least initially. This slow 'acclimatization' to the proximity of other Rabbits can work, but there are a few Rabbits (usually Does) who will never stop being a bully to their partner if other Rabbits are in sight. IME this is rare, I have kept multiple Rabbits in bonded pairs living in close proximity to each other for over 20 years. I can only think of one Doe who never once relented in her bossiness and bullying if she could see other Rabbits running about.

    You may find it less fraught come Autumn. Generally decreasing daylight hours tends to reduce the aggression factor.


    Twickenham Veterinary Surgery- A Rabbit Savvy small animal Veterinary Practice in SW London
    https://www.twickenhamvets.com/

    Keep up to date with the RHD2 situation in the UK. This highly respected Facebook page provides accurate and up-to-date information. Both the RWAF and some Rabbit Savvy Vets contribute to the page
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/1744958082388756/

  5. #5
    Wise Old Thumper
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    If you do decide to put a barrier between them it will need to be high enough so they won't jump over.

  6. #6

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    In the rescue she was in a room full of rabbits, in her previous home she was one of 14 “free range” (not all related either) She’s even stayed with our rabbit sitter who has buns and not been bothered. It’s just something about this new doe that upsets her. I’ve built a 3ft high divider so will start with that and see how they go and see if it calms down. Thanks for the advice!

  7. #7

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    Yeah I’ve built a big 3ft one, should be ok and I always stay out with them to monitor

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