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Thread: Bonding babies?

  1. #1

    Default Bonding babies?

    Hi everyone, if you have seen my previous thread you will know my situation and I am not ready for another bun or buns yet. But.. for when I begin looking what would you recommend? I have always had single buns and they have been super happy as they are indoor house buns with loads of peopl time and other animal time. However after I lost my Bea I am wondering whether I should get two buns this time around or just the 1 what would you recommend? This is my first question
    Secondly are there any advantages or disadvantages to owning a single bun or 2 buns. I am worried the new bunnies wouldn’t be as pwrsonable with me if I had two which is probably a bit silly as my other buns were just like little dogs and so comfortable around the whole famil and I know that this is probably due to the way they were brought up with hand feeding nuggets etc as babies, being really slow and gentle with them and always getting out and handled in the house in the middle of everything so my new buns would probably be the same! However I am wondering if them having each other makes them less lovable to people. Also I am so worried that if one passed away that the other bun would go into decline and be distraught? Is 3 a safer number? Any advantages and disadvantages? This is my second question
    And lastly if I got two babies instead of a bonded rescue pair ( planning at looking at rescue first ) however if I did get two babies would they be ok to be bonded from
    A) separate litters? What is the specifications with bonding two babies at a young age (before hormones?)
    B) same litter (would they be already bonded and just need neutering (will do this anyway)
    C) separate breeds of different ages (etc if I found a nethie breeder with one bun I liked that couldn’t leave for a few weeks and a lop breefer who’s bun I wanted was already ready to go?) would this work
    Thankyou very much for your help!

  2. #2
    Wise Old Thumper
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    It is almost always better to have 2 rabbits and it doesn't stop them from bonding with us as we have the food and the treats! The best bond is with a boy and a girl, possibly brother and sister.

  3. #3
    Mama Doe Craig 1965's Avatar
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    Belles Bunnies - Firstly, I am by no means any expert on bonding. Others on the forum are far more knowledgable on the subject and have had far more experience than I have. So basically all I can offer is an opinion based on my own experiences. Personally I would aim for a pair of bunnies rather than 3. This is based purely on grounds of any sort of relationship/friendship. Think of the dynamics in a friendship with 3 people. Two might want to do one thing, one might want something different. Ultimately, it is possible one might be left out. That said, there are many wonderful people on this forum who have 3 and four or more bonded bunnies and they will rightly suggest that a three bond is do-able and works. As I say, this is just my view. A pair is a good way to start off. You are very correct in looking ahead at what happens when one sadly passes. Having been in that position recently, I can tell you that from my perspective, it is not easy. Rabbits do (and it's well documented) or at least can, go into a decline because they grieve. It's a natural process and we need to understand that they grieve and allow them that right. And, in much the same way as we humans do, they can get depressed about the loss in a bonded pair. As their guardian, this is where your understanding of your rabbits will be most useful. Is single bun still eating (they go into stasis) and do they show interest. When a bonded pair become one, it's hugely important to lavish love and care towards the surviving bun to show them they are not alone. We used cuddle toys which were just charity shop fur toys. Some were rabbits, some were guinea pigs and dogs. They provided companionship and something for the lone bun to snuggle up to and groom and so on. We found them a great comfort and something you could already introduce at the pairing stage when you eventually get your new bun(s). Some buns don't take to a new partner after loosing their bonded partner - it just happens that way and I can't help explain why that is. If you had a three bun relationship, yes the three would become two and that might help the dynamics. But that's a long way off for you and probably not really something you need to think too much on at the moment.
    Rabbits are by nature, sociable animals who thrive on companionship. They need companionship and it is a wonderful thing to observe two buns in deep love in a bonded relationship, so I would advocate definately looking at two rabbits. It IS more work and more costs so you have to factor that in. But as guardians, we must accept that responsibility. Personally, I would look to rescue centres for your buns. To make it easier, some centres will have bonded pairs ready for adoption and would only release them as a bonded pair. This saves some of the issues that bonding two neutral bunnies brings. But you'd need to accept a period of unsettlement as any bonded pair would need time to adjust to the new surroundings and get used to you and your family and home. But the fact they are bonded means they would have comfort with each other. Would that make them any less loving and friendly towards you? Not in my opinion. You must earn a rabbits trust. It is sacred to them and especially from a rescue centre where there might be some 'history' on how the rabbits arrived. Time spent with your new pair is always well spent and you build up their trust to you. Rabbits have a complex system of communication as they are not really vocal, so taking time to understand 'the language of lagomorphs' is also something that is well spent. There are many pages on rabbit language and communication so I would advocate looking at those to see what body language rabbits use.
    Some varieties of rabbits can be more accepting than others. Harlequin rabbits are renowned for being placid, very easy going and loving rabbits and having owned one, I can vouch for that reputation. But I would also suggest that all rabbits can be loving towards their guardians with the right respect and love. Like us, they respond to how they are treated. All of the forum users have various breeds and we all share that love and respect for our rabbits so every breed is covered on the forum. It might also depend how much space you have and so on.
    I would also suggest similar ages for any bonded buns and getting young buns would be a positive start. That said, older buns are often not considered by adopters at rescue centres and that is very sad because all they want is a loving home with someone. So please don't dismiss the slightly older buns.
    It is also usual to suggest that any rabbits should be neutered/spayed. It's very important from a health pespective especially with females and prevents any possibility of increasing your bun-family if you have a male/female bond. I may well be incorrect, but my own readings suggest that two females would be more difficult to bond as the female tends to be the dominant in a bond. A male/female bond would always be better - in my opinion.
    Getting rabbits from the same litter is probably fine - it's not something I've done but they would know each other. Whether that dynamic changes as they grow older, I don't know.
    Every rabbit is unique - like we are. They have a personality, a soul, a character and that is all waiting to be brought out by you. They want the same as we all do - to be safe and loved with food and to be taken care of when they are not well. And one thing that is important is to try to find a rabbit savvy vet. Again, if you went to a rescue centre, you may well find that the centre can suggest or know of a rabbit savvy vet who they use.
    And finally, from a personal point of view, please use the forum for help and advice. The people on here are simply wonderful and full of experience and knowledge, help and support. They are deeply committed to the welfare of their pets and someone always knows exactly what you need so there's always going to be someone who can help or point you in the right direction.
    Hope this helps and looking forward to updates and photos.
    Craig

  4. #4
    Warren Veteran daphnephoebe's Avatar
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    I've replied in your quote as it's easier to follow everything on my phone x

    Quote Originally Posted by Belles.bunnies View Post
    Hi everyone, if you have seen my previous thread you will know my situation and I am not ready for another bun or buns yet. But.. for when I begin looking what would you recommend? I have always had single buns and they have been super happy as they are indoor house buns with loads of peopl time and other animal time. However after I lost my Bea I am wondering whether I should get two buns this time around or just the 1 what would you recommend? This is my first question

    I will always recommend a pair. After having Daphne as a single bun, and then a part of a pair she is so so so much happier with her "sister".

    Secondly are there any advantages or disadvantages to owning a single bun or 2 buns. I am worried the new bunnies wouldn’t be as pwrsonable with me if I had two which is probably a bit silly as my other buns were just like little dogs and so comfortable around the whole famil and I know that this is probably due to the way they were brought up with hand feeding nuggets etc as babies, being really slow and gentle with them and always getting out and handled in the house in the middle of everything so my new buns would probably be the same! However I am wondering if them having each other makes them less lovable to people. Also I am so worried that if one passed away that the other bun would go into decline and be distraught? Is 3 a safer number? Any advantages and disadvantages? This is my second question

    I did find once Daphne was bonded to Phoebe she didn't need me and OH as much. She used to sit and snuggle on my chest for strokes etc. Now she has Phoebe for snuggles and grooming she doesn't require that from me. They still interact with me. She runs to greet me when I come home, bangs on the baby gate to my room for attention etc.

    Yes I do miss her being so snuggly to me... but she was also younger at that point before her hormones kicked in so she could have naturally changed without a bonded partner.

    I've no doubt if one passes away the other will greave just as we will. But once that process is over they normally adjust to single life. If not then rebonding is an option to strongly consider... they don't bond for life so it's easy to introduce a new friend.


    And lastly if I got two babies instead of a bonded rescue pair ( planning at looking at rescue first ) however if I did get two babies would they be ok to be bonded from
    A) separate litters? What is the specifications with bonding two babies at a young age (before hormones?)

    I'd wait until 6 weeks after neutering as hormones can kick in early and that could damage or reduce the chance of a successful bond.

    B) same litter (would they be already bonded and just need neutering (will do this anyway)

    A pair from a litter does not mean they will be bonded but generally it's easy to keep them together during neutering etc which will encourage a bond to be made.

    C) separate breeds of different ages (etc if I found a nethie breeder with one bun I liked that couldn’t leave for a few weeks and a lop breefer who’s bun I wanted was already ready to go?) would this work
    Thankyou very much for your help!

    Bonding different breeds and different ages is fine. I'd suggest however waiting until both are neutered for at least 6 weeks before attempting a bond. Daphne and Phoebe are close in age and similar breed but that didn't mean their bond was easy.


    Sent from my SM-G903F using Tapatalk
    Even the strongest need to have a day of weakness

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Craig 1965 View Post
    Belles Bunnies - Firstly, I am by no means any expert on bonding. Others on the forum are far more knowledgable on the subject and have had far more experience than I have. So basically all I can offer is an opinion based on my own experiences. Personally I would aim for a pair of bunnies rather than 3. This is based purely on grounds of any sort of relationship/friendship. Think of the dynamics in a friendship with 3 people. Two might want to do one thing, one might want something different. Ultimately, it is possible one might be left out. That said, there are many wonderful people on this forum who have 3 and four or more bonded bunnies and they will rightly suggest that a three bond is do-able and works. As I say, this is just my view. A pair is a good way to start off. You are very correct in looking ahead at what happens when one sadly passes. Having been in that position recently, I can tell you that from my perspective, it is not easy. Rabbits do (and it's well documented) or at least can, go into a decline because they grieve. It's a natural process and we need to understand that they grieve and allow them that right. And, in much the same way as we humans do, they can get depressed about the loss in a bonded pair. As their guardian, this is where your understanding of your rabbits will be most useful. Is single bun still eating (they go into stasis) and do they show interest. When a bonded pair become one, it's hugely important to lavish love and care towards the surviving bun to show them they are not alone. We used cuddle toys which were just charity shop fur toys. Some were rabbits, some were guinea pigs and dogs. They provided companionship and something for the lone bun to snuggle up to and groom and so on. We found them a great comfort and something you could already introduce at the pairing stage when you eventually get your new bun(s). Some buns don't take to a new partner after loosing their bonded partner - it just happens that way and I can't help explain why that is. If you had a three bun relationship, yes the three would become two and that might help the dynamics. But that's a long way off for you and probably not really something you need to think too much on at the moment.
    Rabbits are by nature, sociable animals who thrive on companionship. They need companionship and it is a wonderful thing to observe two buns in deep love in a bonded relationship, so I would advocate definately looking at two rabbits. It IS more work and more costs so you have to factor that in. But as guardians, we must accept that responsibility. Personally, I would look to rescue centres for your buns. To make it easier, some centres will have bonded pairs ready for adoption and would only release them as a bonded pair. This saves some of the issues that bonding two neutral bunnies brings. But you'd need to accept a period of unsettlement as any bonded pair would need time to adjust to the new surroundings and get used to you and your family and home. But the fact they are bonded means they would have comfort with each other. Would that make them any less loving and friendly towards you? Not in my opinion. You must earn a rabbits trust. It is sacred to them and especially from a rescue centre where there might be some 'history' on how the rabbits arrived. Time spent with your new pair is always well spent and you build up their trust to you. Rabbits have a complex system of communication as they are not really vocal, so taking time to understand 'the language of lagomorphs' is also something that is well spent. There are many pages on rabbit language and communication so I would advocate looking at those to see what body language rabbits use.
    Some varieties of rabbits can be more accepting than others. Harlequin rabbits are renowned for being placid, very easy going and loving rabbits and having owned one, I can vouch for that reputation. But I would also suggest that all rabbits can be loving towards their guardians with the right respect and love. Like us, they respond to how they are treated. All of the forum users have various breeds and we all share that love and respect for our rabbits so every breed is covered on the forum. It might also depend how much space you have and so on.
    I would also suggest similar ages for any bonded buns and getting young buns would be a positive start. That said, older buns are often not considered by adopters at rescue centres and that is very sad because all they want is a loving home with someone. So please don't dismiss the slightly older buns.
    It is also usual to suggest that any rabbits should be neutered/spayed. It's very important from a health pespective especially with females and prevents any possibility of increasing your bun-family if you have a male/female bond. I may well be incorrect, but my own readings suggest that two females would be more difficult to bond as the female tends to be the dominant in a bond. A male/female bond would always be better - in my opinion.
    Getting rabbits from the same litter is probably fine - it's not something I've done but they would know each other. Whether that dynamic changes as they grow older, I don't know.
    Every rabbit is unique - like we are. They have a personality, a soul, a character and that is all waiting to be brought out by you. They want the same as we all do - to be safe and loved with food and to be taken care of when they are not well. And one thing that is important is to try to find a rabbit savvy vet. Again, if you went to a rescue centre, you may well find that the centre can suggest or know of a rabbit savvy vet who they use.
    And finally, from a personal point of view, please use the forum for help and advice. The people on here are simply wonderful and full of experience and knowledge, help and support. They are deeply committed to the welfare of their pets and someone always knows exactly what you need so there's always going to be someone who can help or point you in the right direction.
    Hope this helps and looking forward to updates and photos.
    Craig
    Thankyou so much for replying again!! That’s so detailed and lots of amazing info I have learnt a lot. I think possibly a male female neutered pair or just a single bun. They are house buns anyway so get lots of human contact I think I am going to originally look for bonded pairs and then single buns if I don’t find what I’m looking for! Thankyou so much and I agree all rabbits are different and have souls they all have such varying personalities it’s lively to get to know them each

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by tonibun View Post
    It is almost always better to have 2 rabbits and it doesn't stop them from bonding with us as we have the food and the treats! The best bond is with a boy and a girl, possibly brother and sister.
    Okay thankyou so much!! Haha I supply lots of yummy things for buns so hope they will love me back! I am planning a. Neutered boy and girl pair

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by daphnephoebe View Post
    I've replied in your quote as it's easier to follow everything on my phone x





    Sent from my SM-G903F using Tapatalk
    x

  8. #8
    Wise Old Thumper tulsi's Avatar
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    A neutered boy and a spayed girl pair sound great. Hopefully you have some decent rescues near by so that you can choose a happily bonded couple to bring home. Best of luck when the time comes.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by tulsi View Post
    A neutered boy and a spayed girl pair sound great. Hopefully you have some decent rescues near by so that you can choose a happily bonded couple to bring home. Best of luck when the time comes.
    Thankyiu sk mych xx

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