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Thread: Rabbit newbie...can I ask a few questions!....

  1. #1

    Default Rabbit newbie...can I ask a few questions!....

    Hi

    My first time here!

    I've had 2 tanks of tropical fish for several years so I'm used to the commitment looking after pets, but I've never had a rabbit, can I please ask...

    a) I live in a flat, no access to a garden, is it ok to have an indoor only bunny?

    b) I'm ok with dogs but allergic to cat hair, do you think a rabbit might cause allergies?

    c) Is it cruel to keep just one rabbit, should you always have a pair? I'm thinking about time where I'm at work and it might get lonely.

    d) What size hutch is good for an indoor rabbit?

    Last night I fell in love with a rabbit up for adoption at PetsAtHome, but I want to do my research first! I read the thing about hiding electrical cables and anything they can chew! I'm happy to do that.

    Thanks for your time!

  2. #2

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    Welcome to the forum!

    a) Yes, that's fine. It's great if you can provide access to outside plants, but fresh veg and plenty of hay will be enough for an indoor bunny. (You can also consider offering some potted herbs if they're rabbit-safe, buying dried grass - there's all sorts of options if you don't have access to fresh vegetation)

    b) Yes, possibly. I'm quite sneezy around cats and have been ok with a bunny, but if it's a bad allergy you may want to be prepared.

    c) I think the general consensus is that an already bonded pair from a rescue is the least stressful option for all concerned, but people do keep just one bunny. We started with a singleton, and although it's been much more stress and hard work in the long run, it made it much easier to begin with. He was our first bunny, and it was so much easier to get to know him, how to look after him, what to look for etc with just one. If you're prepared for stress later on - and it would be better to aim to eventually have a pair, even if you decide to get just one now - then getting just one might be be easier for you. It's a judgment call. You can also keep just one, but they're likely to be much happier with a friend. (We had this debate on and off the entire time we had him)

    d) Some official guidance is here: http://www.therabbithouse.com/guide_size.asp But as ever, it's a matter of circumstance. Our hutch is slightly smaller than recommended (only 5ft) but our rabbit can free-range the whole flat, so has a lot more than the overall recommended space, and that seems to be generally acceptable. Will you be able to bunny-proof a whole room/s for the bunny to exercise in, and how big will that space be?

    Also be aware that rabbits are a bit more work! I kept fish before rabbits (with a hamster in-between, so actually quite a nice progression ) and our rabbit takes a lot more time and work than they did. Are you ready for never having clean floors again, needing to discourage urinating on furniture (including sofa and bed, if they have access), getting furniture chewed to pieces etc? I would never discourage someone from having an indoor bunny - we've only had one, and for a few months, but I don't think I could go back now, it's just been wonderful - but it is hard work, too, and you have to be prepared to be very relaxed about the state of your home if you share it!

    Best of luck with whatever you decide, keep us updated! And do keep asking questions if you have any!

  3. #3
    Wise Old Thumper *lily*'s Avatar
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    Staffordshire
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monty's Human View Post
    Welcome to the forum!

    a) Yes, that's fine. It's great if you can provide access to outside plants, but fresh veg and plenty of hay will be enough for an indoor bunny. (You can also consider offering some potted herbs if they're rabbit-safe, buying dried grass - there's all sorts of options if you don't have access to fresh vegetation)

    b) Yes, possibly. I'm quite sneezy around cats and have been ok with a bunny, but if it's a bad allergy you may want to be prepared.

    c) I think the general consensus is that an already bonded pair from a rescue is the least stressful option for all concerned, but people do keep just one bunny. We started with a singleton, and although it's been much more stress and hard work in the long run, it made it much easier to begin with. He was our first bunny, and it was so much easier to get to know him, how to look after him, what to look for etc with just one. If you're prepared for stress later on - and it would be better to aim to eventually have a pair, even if you decide to get just one now - then getting just one might be be easier for you. It's a judgment call. You can also keep just one, but they're likely to be much happier with a friend. (We had this debate on and off the entire time we had him)

    d) Some official guidance is here: http://www.therabbithouse.com/guide_size.asp But as ever, it's a matter of circumstance. Our hutch is slightly smaller than recommended (only 5ft) but our rabbit can free-range the whole flat, so has a lot more than the overall recommended space, and that seems to be generally acceptable. Will you be able to bunny-proof a whole room/s for the bunny to exercise in, and how big will that space be?

    Also be aware that rabbits are a bit more work! I kept fish before rabbits (with a hamster in-between, so actually quite a nice progression ) and our rabbit takes a lot more time and work than they did. Are you ready for never having clean floors again, needing to discourage urinating on furniture (including sofa and bed, if they have access), getting furniture chewed to pieces etc? I would never discourage someone from having an indoor bunny - we've only had one, and for a few months, but I don't think I could go back now, it's just been wonderful - but it is hard work, too, and you have to be prepared to be very relaxed about the state of your home if you share it!

    Best of luck with whatever you decide, keep us updated! And do keep asking questions if you have any!
    All of this!

    BUT, having totally freeranging house bunnies is amazing too!

  4. #4
    Mama Doe MiniC's Avatar
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    If your house is safe enough, I'd even consider letting your buns free-range - ours were in pens until we bonded them - the pen takes up a lot of room, but free-range, i think they take up less space. We're in a flat, and they don't seem to mind it.

    You can bond yourself, but it is a very stressful thing - you need a lot of space to do it (like a double bedroom amount of space that you won't be able to use for a good week) and it was time off work and sleepless nights when we did it. If you can get a ready-bonded pair, it's a lot better.

    Cleaning takes a lot longer with bunnies too. Like 2 hours for our living room weekly.

    They're worth it though!

  5. #5

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    Thanks so much for all your replies. Hugely appreciated!

    I'll give this some thought!

  6. #6
    Wise Old Thumper MightyMax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monty's Human View Post
    Welcome to the forum!

    a) Yes, that's fine. It's great if you can provide access to outside plants, but fresh veg and plenty of hay will be enough for an indoor bunny. (You can also consider offering some potted herbs if they're rabbit-safe, buying dried grass - there's all sorts of options if you don't have access to fresh vegetation)

    b) Yes, possibly. I'm quite sneezy around cats and have been ok with a bunny, but if it's a bad allergy you may want to be prepared.

    c) I think the general consensus is that an already bonded pair from a rescue is the least stressful option for all concerned, but people do keep just one bunny. We started with a singleton, and although it's been much more stress and hard work in the long run, it made it much easier to begin with. He was our first bunny, and it was so much easier to get to know him, how to look after him, what to look for etc with just one. If you're prepared for stress later on - and it would be better to aim to eventually have a pair, even if you decide to get just one now - then getting just one might be be easier for you. It's a judgment call. You can also keep just one, but they're likely to be much happier with a friend. (We had this debate on and off the entire time we had him)

    d) Some official guidance is here: http://www.therabbithouse.com/guide_size.asp But as ever, it's a matter of circumstance. Our hutch is slightly smaller than recommended (only 5ft) but our rabbit can free-range the whole flat, so has a lot more than the overall recommended space, and that seems to be generally acceptable. Will you be able to bunny-proof a whole room/s for the bunny to exercise in, and how big will that space be?

    Also be aware that rabbits are a bit more work! I kept fish before rabbits (with a hamster in-between, so actually quite a nice progression ) and our rabbit takes a lot more time and work than they did. Are you ready for never having clean floors again, needing to discourage urinating on furniture (including sofa and bed, if they have access), getting furniture chewed to pieces etc? I would never discourage someone from having an indoor bunny - we've only had one, and for a few months, but I don't think I could go back now, it's just been wonderful - but it is hard work, too, and you have to be prepared to be very relaxed about the state of your home if you share it!

    Best of luck with whatever you decide, keep us updated! And do keep asking questions if you have any!

    Excellent post MH

  7. #7
    Warren Scout
    Join Date
    May 2016
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    South Gloucestershire
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    I have indoor and outdoor bunnies. My indoor is a continental giant. He is free run most of the time but is locked up overnight and when were all out of house. He lives in an x lge dog cage. I have to say I think I have been incredibly lucky. He has not ever peed or pooped anywhere but his litter tray, he wasn't even litter trained when we got him, he just did it from the word go. He has not really chewed anything, only problem he is a digger and has ruined my hall rug, think this is our fault though cause its by the patio doors and after a nice spell of weather we had the doors open and he could come in and out as he pleased. I think he now digs to try and get out!!

  8. #8

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    Hi Welcome to the forum

    We currently have one rabbit living inside in my dd's bedroom (plus another 8 outside). As others have said it's fine to have an indoor only bun, as long as they have plenty of space and aren't confined to a cage. Our Spud does go outside on nice days though and it's nice to have that option, especially when I want to give things a good clean. But it's not a necessity.

    We've been lucky in that he's really good at using a litter tray and doesn't chew anything he shouldn't. But prior to Spud we had a pair living in the room and the female would dig at the carpet and has made a hole in one area. She's a nightmare all round though and would bite your ankles as you tried to walk across the room and even now she's outside, she frequently tries to bite my hand when I'm feeding them / changing water etc. So as long as your prepared for the mess and possible challenges, including if you go out, what they can get up to.

    I think a pair is always best, if possible. Is the bun your interested in already neutered/spayed? If not then this is another consideration and then, in time, finding a friend for them. At the moment we have two singles who are waiting for ops and then bonding.

    Good luck x

    **created by my DD Lionheadlop**

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