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Thread: New boy, started biting the kids

  1. #1

    Default New boy, started biting the kids

    Hello. This is my first post, sorry I didn't introduced myself.

    We had taken on a bunny who is going to be 5 years old (and has been castrated years ago). He has always been on his own and is Netherlander dwarf. He came to us and has not had much attention for some time, so is very skittish, which is understandable.

    He has a little run in the living room, next to the Guinea piggies (both girls) and also has the run of the garden when we are here (atm, out garden is not fox proof, so we don't leave him there without anyone being home, or during the night).

    This morning, my daughter wanted to take him out for a run around and he just charged and bit her. I know that he is not really socialised and these things take time, however, I would appreciate any advice that is given to us as he seems to be getting worse.

    I do realise that bunnies are social animals, however, given his age and temperament, should we first try and get him more comfortable and less skittish and bitey?

    We also have a dog who thinks that our bunny could be his new best mate for playing with (in a nice way, but we do keep him away from our bunny when we are playing).

    I know how many things are wrong with all this, ie getting the bunny, having the dog, having the kids - 10 and 13.......etc, but please, try not to tell us off for all this, just help me to try and give our bunny the best life he can have.

    Thank you for reading.

  2. #2
    Mama Doe happybunny's Avatar
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    Aug 2004
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    Yorkshire
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    Firstly I would check if he really is castrated. Its should be quiet obvious...

    When he went for your daughter was he in his hutch? He could be cage guarding and felt threatened by her entering his space. Can you allow him to hop out of the hutch himself. Also was he near is food bowl?

    Also how did your daughter approach him? As a rabbit her is a pray animal and will feel scared if not used to been picked up (although many rabbits do not like to be picked up)

    I would advise keeping your dog away from the rabbit at all times. Even just seeing or smelling the dog will stress the bunny out.

    I hope this helps a little.

  3. #3
    Wise Old Thumper
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    Village in North Hampshire
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    21,176

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    Quote Originally Posted by happybunny View Post
    Firstly I would check if he really is castrated. Its should be quiet obvious...

    When he went for your daughter was he in his hutch? He could be cage guarding and felt threatened by her entering his space. Can you allow him to hop out of the hutch himself. Also was he near is food bowl?

    Also how did your daughter approach him? As a rabbit her is a pray animal and will feel scared if not used to been picked up (although many rabbits do not like to be picked up)

    I would advise keeping your dog away from the rabbit at all times. Even just seeing or smelling the dog will stress the bunny out.

    I hope this helps a little.
    Very good advice.

  4. #4
    Mama Doe Mrsmcarey's Avatar
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    May 2012
    Location
    West Midlands, Birmingham, UK
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    4,908

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    My nethie girl Pie lives indoors by herself as she isn't herself at the moment lives under my stairs and if I put my hands in without her seeing me red eyed white don't see too well in bright or dull light she will charge and grunt and has taken a chunk or two out of me but if she knows I'm coming and sees me she will run at me but I get kisses and nibbles not the hidden Wilde monster inside lol


    Dumplin my boy sadly missed 21/09/12 - 11/10/14
    Sleep tight my beautiful NoNo and Baby

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