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Thread: Help with bunny behaviour

  1. #1

    Default Help with bunny behaviour

    Hi All

    I'm after a bit of help with the behaviour of my bunny. She's about 9 months old and been with us for about 6 months. Up until last week she was incredibly affectionate, having not had rabbits before I was shocked at how good a pet she was. She's a draft lop mix with lion head and lives a very pampered life indoors. Generally she has a hutch that is open to a run that she's in during the day and night, in the evenings she has free run of the lounge / entrance hall and occasionally kitchen if we're around.

    How ever as of last week it all seams to have changed and I'm not too sure why, Came home and she'd been left unattended for 10 minutes and in this time managed to burrow / dig through one of the sofa bases, not impressed we put her back in to her hutch, although being a soft touch she was back out for an hour or so before we went to bed.

    Ever since she's been a bit of a nightmare, she seamed to stop grooming properly although has restated this again, slightly aggressive at times and seems disinterested in interacting with us compared to before and very keen on digging at everything / exploring outside of the boundaries we put in place, as impressed as i am that she can move the guarding around the TV, I'd still rather she didn't. Still seams to be eating ok.

    I've done a little research and it seams that at this age it could be hormonal and that having her spayed may well help, is this likely to calm her down a bit as I'd very much like the old Rabbit back

  2. #2
    Mama Doe
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    Quote Originally Posted by andyag View Post
    I've done a little research and it seams that at this age it could be hormonal and that having her spayed may well help, is this likely to calm her down a bit as I'd very much like the old Rabbit back
    It does sound like she may be hormonal. She is old enough to be spayed. Spaying has other benefits, such as removing the very high risk of uterine cancer. Have a word with a rabbit savvy vet - you can ask on here if you need a recommendation for one in your area.

  3. #3
    Forum Buddy Zoobec's Avatar
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    It does sound like hormonal behaviour, I'm sure spaying her will help. If you don't have a rabbit savvy get already you could post asking for recommended ones in your area.

    Binky free at the bridge Boots, you will never be forgotten xxxx
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  4. #4

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    Thanks for the quick replies, does sound like spaying could help.

    I guess its now a case of finding a decent vet, she did go to local one when she stopped eating and I wasn't 100% convinced by them. I'm near Tonbridge in Kent if anyone has any recommendations

  5. #5
    Warren Veteran
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    Quote Originally Posted by andyag View Post
    Thanks for the quick replies, does sound like spaying could help.

    I guess its now a case of finding a decent vet, she did go to local one when she stopped eating and I wasn't 100% convinced by them. I'm near Tonbridge in Kent if anyone has any recommendations
    You won't get a better vet than Mark Rowland at Trinity Vets in Maidstone. I don't use him (too far away), but my vet regularly contacts him for advice. Several forum members are lucky enough to be able to consult him.

  6. #6
    Wise Old Thumper MightyMax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by andyag View Post
    Hi All

    I'm after a bit of help with the behaviour of my bunny. She's about 9 months old and been with us for about 6 months. Up until last week she was incredibly affectionate, having not had rabbits before I was shocked at how good a pet she was. She's a draft lop mix with lion head and lives a very pampered life indoors. Generally she has a hutch that is open to a run that she's in during the day and night, in the evenings she has free run of the lounge / entrance hall and occasionally kitchen if we're around.

    How ever as of last week it all seams to have changed and I'm not too sure why, Came home and she'd been left unattended for 10 minutes and in this time managed to burrow / dig through one of the sofa bases, not impressed we put her back in to her hutch, although being a soft touch she was back out for an hour or so before we went to bed.

    Ever since she's been a bit of a nightmare, she seamed to stop grooming properly although has restated this again, slightly aggressive at times and seems disinterested in interacting with us compared to before and very keen on digging at everything / exploring outside of the boundaries we put in place, as impressed as i am that she can move the guarding around the TV, I'd still rather she didn't. Still seams to be eating ok.

    I've done a little research and it seams that at this age it could be hormonal and that having her spayed may well help, is this likely to calm her down a bit as I'd very much like the old Rabbit back

    Hey Andy, welcome to the Forum


    Yes, this does seem to be hormonal behaviour, as you suggest. It would be a good idea from health and behaviour point of view to get her spayed though .....


    http://rabbitwelfare.co.uk/rabbit-health/neutering/


    http://rabbit.org/faq-spaying-and-neutering/


    http://www.cottontails-rescue.org.uk/health/neutering/


    The other thing could be that she is bored. I know she has lots of space and things to do, but without a companion of their own species rabbits can become bored and sometimes morose. I have always found rabbits are better behaved when there's more than one of them

  7. #7

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    Thanks again for the replies, I've spoken to Trinity vets as they're not all that far away and looks like they can do it so look like that will be the first task, they said they'd do a heath check as well.

    I assume it may also be worth looking at getting her a companion to help with boredom, is it a difficult task to introduce a 2nd rabbit as up until last week when she started getting grumpy / disinfested she was quite keen on being the centre of attention.

  8. #8
    Wise Old Thumper MightyMax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by andyag View Post
    Thanks again for the replies, I've spoken to Trinity vets as they're not all that far away and looks like they can do it so look like that will be the first task, they said they'd do a heath check as well.

    I assume it may also be worth looking at getting her a companion to help with boredom, is it a difficult task to introduce a 2nd rabbit as up until last week when she started getting grumpy / disinfested she was quite keen on being the centre of attention.


    I have bonded hundreds of rabbits - my own/fosters/rescues and been very successful That said, it's not always a bowl of cherries and you need to put some thought into it. You will get loads of support from members here.

    Some reading - sometimes contradictory, but everyone has their own way of doing it:


    http://rabbit.org/the-most-important...g-is-patience/

    http://rabbit.org/introducing-rabbit...oup-situation/

    http://www.cottontails-rescue.org.uk...nding-bunnies/ (good for pair bonding)

    http://www.fatfluffs.com/info/bonding/

    http://www.actionforrabbits.co.uk/bonding.html


    Book in RWAF shop:

    https://shop.rabbitwelfare.co.uk/pro...iona-campbell/


    Mischief and Tinkerís Mum
    http://forums.rabbitrehome.org.uk/sh...y-trios-videos!

  9. #9
    Mama Doe roxyroller88's Avatar
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    I agree in regards to getting her a friend
    Bonding can be difficult, I've recently bonded two buns myself and there were a few blips along the way but I got heaps of good advice from the people on here and they are absolutely fine now
    If you go to a rescue the bun you get will come vaccinated and neutered and they will also start off the bonding process for you so it's easier when you get them home
    Xxx
    I'm fundraising for Rabbit Rescue North West

    https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/rrnw

  10. #10
    New Kit ThePhillips's Avatar
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    Definitely re-ierate what roxyroller88 said - goto a Rescue/Animal Sanctuary. Research them in your area because some are more tuned to Bunnies, and will provide a lot of help kicking off a bond. They may want to visit you first to ensure that their bun is going to a rabbit friendly home. Good luck, its all worth it :0)

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