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Thread: Which to Neuter

  1. #1

    Default Which to Neuter

    Hi all, we have a male and female rabbit which were separated at 14 wks due to him trying to mount her. They live separated but we allow them to go out and run together in the garden under supervision. They get on very well and doing this has meant they have kept their bond. They've both been to the vets over the last 8 wks with snuffles which hasn't cleared and looks like something they will have to live with. I'm desperately wanting them to live together again and so we are debating which to have neutered. The make, Onyx is very friendly, he comes to greet you excitedly and loves being groomed. However Willow is a bit more reserved. Initially she didn't mind being picked up but now she kicks, occasionally thumps, she's begun digging in various places in the garden and sometimes lunges at my husband and children. We are wondering which is best to get done. She seems to have more hormone issues at present which perhaps beutering would help reduce but I've heard it's much more invasive for females. What would you advise? What are your thoughts? They are now 21 weeks old. Many Thanks in Adavance, Louise xx

  2. #2
    Wise Old Thumper
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    The best advice, to give them the best chance to be bonded long term is to get them both done. That will stop both their hormones and it is their hormones that will be most likely to create problems with the other (such as excessive humping, or territorial aggression).

    With a rabbit savvy vet and a healthy rabbit, then yes, it is more invasive for females, but it is still seen as 'routine'. Her recovery may be slightly longer, but she will also gain the benefits of complete removal of any risk of hormonal related health issues (such as cancers or infections, which have a high probability of happening in unspayed female rabbits).


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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Louise H View Post
    Hi all, we have a male and female rabbit which were separated at 14 wks due to him trying to mount her. They live separated but we allow them to go out and run together in the garden under supervision. They get on very well and doing this has meant they have kept their bond. They've both been to the vets over the last 8 wks with snuffles which hasn't cleared and looks like something they will have to live with. I'm desperately wanting them to live together again and so we are debating which to have neutered. The make, Onyx is very friendly, he comes to greet you excitedly and loves being groomed. However Willow is a bit more reserved. Initially she didn't mind being picked up but now she kicks, occasionally thumps, she's begun digging in various places in the garden and sometimes lunges at my husband and children. We are wondering which is best to get done. She seems to have more hormone issues at present which perhaps beutering would help reduce but I've heard it's much more invasive for females. What would you advise? What are your thoughts? They are now 21 weeks old. Many Thanks in Adavance, Louise xx
    Personally I'd want them both neutered, but obviously if they have 'snuffles' this may not be possible at the moment. It is not generally possible to keep an entire Buck with a spayed Doe. The Buck will just keep pestering the Doe which will be very stressful for both Rabbits.

    Unspayed Does are at risk of uterine infections and uterine cancer from the age of about 5, sometimes even younger.

    Given that your Rabbits both have 'snuffles' I would want to discuss the neutering situation with a very Rabbit Savvy/Specialist Vet. Obviously a GA would be more risky for a Rabbit with Respiratory tract problems.

  4. #4

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    Could I never just get one of them neutered. I thought at least one of them was neutered they would be happy together?

  5. #5
    Wise Old Thumper MightyMax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sky-O View Post
    The best advice, to give them the best chance to be bonded long term is to get them both done. That will stop both their hormones and it is their hormones that will be most likely to create problems with the other (such as excessive humping, or territorial aggression).

    With a rabbit savvy vet and a healthy rabbit, then yes, it is more invasive for females, but it is still seen as 'routine'. Her recovery may be slightly longer, but she will also gain the benefits of complete removal of any risk of hormonal related health issues (such as cancers or infections, which have a high probability of happening in unspayed female rabbits).

    I totally agree with Sky-O

    There are good reasons for neutering both, and I would certainly do that! It will stop any unwanted behaviour problems in the future.

  6. #6
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    Just to reiterate advice to neuter them both.

  7. #7

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    Should we get them done at the same time then so they have recovery time apart at the same time?? The vet said that with them having snuffles that he'd prescribe antibiotics for a week before and a week after to help eliminate respiratory problems caused by anesthetic. Does this sound right? He said that they seem healthy other than their snuffles, and that their lungs are clear.

  8. #8
    Wise Old Thumper MightyMax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Louise H View Post
    Should we get them done at the same time then so they have recovery time apart at the same time?? The vet said that with them having snuffles that he'd prescribe antibiotics for a week before and a week after to help eliminate respiratory problems caused by anesthetic. Does this sound right? He said that they seem healthy other than their snuffles, and that their lungs are clear.

    Yes this sounds good, and your vet's idea of antibiotic cover also sounds wise

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    Warren Scout binkyCodie's Avatar
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    hi!

    both would need to be done as others have said. doing one will not remove the possibility of the non fixed being territorial, hormonal, grumpy etc, which will create issues

    i would also be very careful with letting them together with them not being fixed.. rabbits can mate incredibly quickly. if you take your eye off of them for a few seconds that can be enough time for them to breed. if anything to me its incredibly risky and i wouldn't do it at all until they are fixed. have runs side by side or cages, so they can interact. but that one is up to you.

    if you want them done separately, i would get the female done first as does can get a lot more issues than males, and if anything seem to be a lot more grumpy.
    as for getting them done together, its preference. its twice the work though. they should both come home with medication for few days, maybe a week. you'll also need to make changes, no sawdust as that can stick to the wound. newpaper for the litter tray (if you have one) and old sheets as bedding. so then cleaning the litter tray every day if you're not already. and then if one won't eat, you'll have hand feeding to do. personally i would find that too stressful.

    usually after fixing you have to rebond anyway from the time apart. males are still fertile 6 weeks after being done (if i remember right), so you would have to keep them apart for 6 weeks. females generally have a massive wound so the mate could pull stitches out, injure her, etc. and then you don't know who is pooping if two are together. so time apart no matter the gender is needed.
    females also need to be stopped from jumping onto high places as they could pull something, so possible cage changes would be needed or living arrangements.

    are they indoor or outdoor rabbits? for me even at this time of year if they are outdoor you will need to bring them in for 72 hours or so to monitor them. maybe even longer so you know they're eating. if they're not, more vet bills for gut stimulants and possible injection of a painkiller. make sure you have money for that! i was caught off guard my boy was kept inside for a week.

    as long as you have a rabbit savy vet, things should go smoothly!

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  10. #10
    Warren Scout binkyCodie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MightyMax View Post
    Yes this sounds good, and your vet's idea of antibiotic cover also sounds wise
    can a GA cause respiratory problems? im very curious now

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