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Thread: Growing your own veg- Winter?

  1. #1

    Default Growing your own veg- Winter?

    Hi
    I'm looking into getting some rabbits. They will be kept indoors in a large 2 storey hutch and let out for a run twice a day and most of the weekend, and will be allowed outside in a run in good weather.
    I love gardening and have grown veg for the family for around 2 years.
    I want to grow the rabbits veg too. I have looked at some lists and have some ideas but I don't know about winter. Any veg I can grow in summer and freeze/dry for winter?
    Any veg that grows well in winter and good for daily use?
    Also do you ever use redi grass? Does the bag keep well or does it dry out?
    Thanks for your help

  2. #2

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    Hello,
    not veg, but how about mint, rosemary and dandelion? I pick these in the summer and put them in the airing cupboard so mine can have them in the winter

  3. #3
    Warren Veteran
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    Hi, welcome to the forum.

    Rabbits should not be given vegetables that have been frozen.

    However, there are several things that can be grown and will last during the winter months. Kale is the best example of this. It will withstand all of the winter weather and rabbits generally love it. We also grow Perpetual Spinach or Spinach Beet, which is OK in cold temperatures, but will not survive frosts. Parsley and Coriander will also last over the winter months here in the South of England.

    Readigrass, in my experience lasts well and does not dry out.

  4. #4
    Warren Scout SammyJae's Avatar
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    I can't help with veg growing but i do feed redigrass. I buy the big bales so they last month's and the are just as good at the last bit as when it's freshly opened

  5. #5

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    Hi
    Thank you all for your replies.
    We already have mint and dandilions growing, so good to know I can dry it. I will get some rosemary and other herbs. Glad that redigrass lasts, I will get a big bale, used to use it for my horses.
    I have spinach and kale seeds already, didnt know you could leave them growing though so that's good!
    Why can't they have veg that's been frozen? (Not buying frozen but freezing myself- so no preservatives/chemicals)
    I know frozen supermarket veg is better for people than the fresh from there as it's frozen closer to picking so keeps nutrients??
    Thank you again

  6. #6

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    Oh and what other winter greens can I feed? Thought too much spinach and kale was bad? Have been looking at the foraging post too. Think I might do that for them!

  7. #7
    Warren Scout Preitler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Omi View Post
    Rabbits should not be given vegetables that have been frozen.
    As long it is thawed fast, or in the fridge to prevent bacterial growth, why?

    I planted Topinampur and feed that all winter long, it takes a pickaxe to harvest it in frozen soil (can't store it for more than a few days), but well, it's a otherwise practically maintanance free veg, its planted around the hutches for shadow in summer. I also feed apples, those I have keep fresh until April in the cellar. Since both are rather high on calories I don't feed too much of those.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nose-twitch View Post
    Hi
    Thank you all for your replies.
    We already have mint and dandilions growing, so good to know I can dry it. I will get some rosemary and other herbs. Glad that redigrass lasts, I will get a big bale, used to use it for my horses.
    I have spinach and kale seeds already, didnt know you could leave them growing though so that's good!
    Why can't they have veg that's been frozen? (Not buying frozen but freezing myself- so no preservatives/chemicals)
    I know frozen supermarket veg is better for people than the fresh from there as it's frozen closer to picking so keeps nutrients??
    Thank you again
    Yes, I'm aware that commercially frozen veg is better for people for the reasons you've mentioned.

    Which veg are you thinking of freezing for the rabbits? Frozen veg usually has to be cooked before eating and so it would become limp and unappetising to the rabbits. In my view the type of veg that rabbits like to eat is best eaten raw, otherwise I think the cell structure would change. I am not suggesting that it would be harmful, just that they wouldn't want to eat it.

    My rabbits will eat kale leaves, stalks and when the plant has finished producing, they will even eat that

    I also forage a lot and during the summer, the rabbits have mainly forage rather than vegetables. I also feed tree leaves and tree twigs (obviously from trees they can consume). Fresh hand-cut grass also goes down well. Bramble leaves are usually available all year round and are generally loved by rabbits.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Preitler View Post
    As long it is thawed fast, or in the fridge to prevent bacterial growth, why?

    I planted Topinampur and feed that all winter long, it takes a pickaxe to harvest it in frozen soil (can't store it for more than a few days), but well, it's a otherwise practically maintanance free veg, its planted around the hutches for shadow in summer. I also feed apples, those I have keep fresh until April in the cellar. Since both are rather high on calories I don't feed too much of those.
    I had to google Topinampur, as I've never heard that name

    I would really love to have a cellar

  10. #10
    Wise Old Thumper Elena's Avatar
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    Default Growing your own veg- Winter?

    Probably better to dry gluts than freezing them. Bramble leaves, hawthorn, willow and plantain dry well as do some herbs. If you grow Jerusalem artichokes then those leaves dry well and are a great source of fibre.

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