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Thread: Would you have your Doe spayed? The discussion continues .. 26 May 2017

  1. #11
    Wise Old Thumper SarahP's Avatar
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    Whilst I do question the 80% figure (but only because I'm always sceptical of such figures that are bandied around for years on end without the back up facts), you have to look at the other benefits too. If spaying piggies were less risky, I'd be all for that too, because spaying creates a much happier, less hormonal girl.
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  2. #12
    Forum Buddy Mackers's Avatar
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    Yes, I would, simply to avoid hormonal behaviours. And did this vet actually do PMs on deceased bunnies or was it was through an external examination that he deemed these does did not have uterine cancer? I know from personal experience that cancers can be present with no obvious lumps and bumps.


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  3. #13
    Wise Old Thumper tulsi's Avatar
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    I would adopt spayed does to avoid hormonal problems and oops litters. Oh and to make bonding easier.

  4. #14
    Wise Old Thumper BattleKat's Avatar
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    I haven't read all the replies so it's probably been mentioned but the 80% figure refers only to females that have not been bred from doesn't it? It doesn't say if the ones he saw have been bred from.

    Either way, I'd have mine done. They wouldn't have lived together without it and were beginning to become aggressive towards me before their spay.

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  5. #15
    Wise Old Thumper MightyMax's Avatar
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    What I find significant is that the does in his test were 'over six months'. But how old were they? If they were quite young, you'd expect no evidence of tumours, surely?

    And over 5 years .. Well I really hope I can expect a longer lifespan for my does than 5 years! One of mine lived to 14 years, and I am glad I had her spayed and didn't take any risks.

  6. #16
    Wise Old Thumper MightyMax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SarahP View Post
    Whilst I do question the 80% figure (but only because I'm always sceptical of such figures that are bandied around for years on end without the back up facts), you have to look at the other benefits too. If spaying piggies were less risky, I'd be all for that too, because spaying creates a much happier, less hormonal girl.
    How often (if at all?) are piggies spayed Sarah?

  7. #17
    Warren Scout Zarla's Avatar
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    As a child, we always kept female buns in the 80s/90 when spaying wasn't common and they mostly died around 5 or 6; we didn't have any females who lived longer than that. We had one beautiful big black male Silver Fox who lived to be ten in the myxy-ridden Lincs countryside without once going to the vet's his entire life..a miracle lol.

    Breeders may have a different experience as if the does have had litters, it's not as likely they'll get reproductive cancer; it's the does who've gone their whole lives entire who get it, I thought?

    All my buns as an adult have been male except one, a grey female lionhead who became aggressive and who I had spayed aged 9 months, terrified the whole time in case of complications. My vet advised taking her to a specialist rabbit vet and I did this. She was very quiet for a week afterwards and only ate hay sparingly, refusing other food, but I guess it was enough to avoid stasis thank goodness. The spaying calmed her down and she seemed much happier and lived to be nearly nine, although she was a dental bunny who needed her front teeth filing every ten days for the last year of her life.

  8. #18
    Forum Buddy Zoobec's Avatar
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    I would always advise spaying, I wouldn't follow the findings of one vets small sample of findings!

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  9. #19

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    There are too many problems with this "study" as others have said: ridiculously small sample size, unscientific measuring tool (i.e. no definitive info on how the presence or abscence of tumours was determined) and use of anecdotal evidence to come to his conclusion. So, yep, I'll still be getting any female buns I have spayed. A large scale, properly conducted study looking at cancer risks in spayed/ unspayed pet rabbits versus anaesthetic risk migh be interesting though? Has it never been done?

  10. #20
    Warren Veteran daphnephoebe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MightyMax View Post
    How often (if at all?) are piggies spayed Sarah?
    If it's any help in 4 years we only spayed one female piggie. That was just because she had mammary tumours and we were aiming to help prevent them coming back quite so soon.

    GA in piggies is much harder to do. They over produce saliva when under GA so you must swab out the mouth every 5 mins.

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