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Thread: Would you have your Doe spayed? The discussion continues .. 26 May 2017

  1. #61
    Wise Old Thumper MightyMax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by binkyCodie View Post
    indeed. from trying to rehab her (shes scared of just about everything, including grass at first) to going through that lol.

    I really hope she doesn't have to ever have to go through another GA. because otherwise I know I need 300 extra just for after if it would repeat itself if it was the GA that reacted badly lol. but since i've had her and she had her dental, touch wood, shes never had any big issues. no stasis, zilch. just an eye ulcer and ripping her dew claws off-twice

    She's quite a handful

    She's incredibly lucky to have you fighting her corner. I take my hat off to you BC xx

  2. #62
    Mama Doe JessBun's Avatar
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    Thanks for posting this MightyMax, it's an interested read. Those who go against the grain and the current way of thinking tend to get it pretty hard, in any group. The whole point of husbandry is that it's constantly changing as we learn and discover more. Husbandry methods for any animal will never be the same in 10 years from now, it is constantly progressing. I like to keep an open mind to that, even if it goes against the grain - since every progression starts with just one discovery, and builds from there.

    Of course, we'd have to see more evidence of it to adopt a different way of thinking and doing things, as with every new progression. It is however something I've wondered about a lot, and will keep an eye on for further updates. Thanks again x

  3. #63
    Wise Old Thumper MightyMax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JessBun View Post
    Thanks for posting this MightyMax, it's an interested read. Those who go against the grain and the current way of thinking tend to get it pretty hard, in any group. The whole point of husbandry is that it's constantly changing as we learn and discover more. Husbandry methods for any animal will never be the same in 10 years from now, it is constantly progressing. I like to keep an open mind to that, even if it goes against the grain - since every progression starts with just one discovery, and builds from there.

    Of course, we'd have to see more evidence of it to adopt a different way of thinking and doing things, as with every new progression. It is however something I've wondered about a lot, and will keep an eye on for further updates. Thanks again x

    You were up late JessBun - how are you?

    I love your posts, as they so often sum up what I feel.

    Going against the grain - yes, never easy. Invites hostility.
    But as you rightly say, every progression has to begin somewhere

  4. #64
    Wise Old Thumper MightyMax's Avatar
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    There's been a very interesting and detailed reply posted to Frances's Facebook page which draws attention to the fact that sex hormones are involved in protection against osteoporosis. This is the same as for humans, which is why post-menopausal women are more at risk.

    Would there be an argument against neutering (males and females) on this basis?

    It's a balancing act - rabbits absorb a lot of calcium and can even suffer from an overload of it due to the way they metabolise it.
    Complicated subject in some ways, straight-forward in others

  5. #65
    Warren Scout Sharpie's Avatar
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    I have never had my girls done, nor did my mum and we've never had an issue with cancer..
    My mum had over 10 girls all not spayed and none died from cancer
    My Rex Lady Blue was in the vets every week being treated for a bacterial infection and the vet told me she was in perfect health other then obviously the respiratory issue.
    Daisy went to the vets on Tuesday as she had the start of GI Stasis and again, shes completely healthy, same for her sister Lulu.

    When people kept telling me about this cancer risk and how high it was, i was thinking bloody hell i must be lucky having had so many rabbits in my past never having it, then i got thinking.. was it a plot from the vets to make more money?!

    My girls are happily bonded with the boys, never had any issues, in fact the girls were easier to bond in then the fixed males! xD

    I know a lot of people will have different experiences and views, so i wouldn't tell people not to spay their girls.
    Last edited by Sharpie; 28-04-2017 at 12:42 PM.
    Yes, my bunnies are my children - in fact they're my Fluff Babies! <3

  6. #66
    Wise Old Thumper MightyMax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sharpie View Post
    I have never had my girls done, nor did my mum and we've never had an issue with cancer..
    My mum had over 10 girls all not spayed and none died from cancer
    My Rex Lady Blue was in the vets every week being treated for a bacterial infection and the vet told me she was in perfect health other then obviously the respiratory issue.
    Daisy went to the vets on Tuesday as she had the start of GI Stasis and again, shes completely healthy, same for her sister Lulu.

    When people kept telling me about this cancer risk and how high it was, i was thinking bloody hell i must be lucky having had so many rabbits in my past never having it, then i got thinking.. was it a plot from the vets to make more money?!

    My girls are happily bonded with the boys, never had any issues, in fact the girls were easier to bond in then the fixed males! xD

    I know a lot of people will have different experiences and views, so i wouldn't tell people not to spay their girls.

    That's really interesting Sharpie. It's good to hear other points of view.

    I don't know how the RWAF arrived at their figure of 80% - I've never seen the data or report on that.

    I hope you're well? When is your move?

  7. #67
    Young Bun Akire's Avatar
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    I would absolutely still have my female bunny spayed even if it turned out her chances of getting cancer are not as high. The risk is still there and it is a terrible way to die (not to mention totally preventable). I have volunteered at various rabbit rescues over the years and every single one does not adopt out unless the bunnies are fixed. Each rescue has had a couple rabbits die from spaying/neutering, but you have to remember they have hundreds of rabbits who have had the procedure. If you have a good rabbit savvy vet then chances of complications are extremely low. I would still spay because it helps promote responsible pet guardianship and is the solution to the overpopulation problem. Rabbits are the third most euthanized animal in shelters here in the US.

    Those are just my reasons
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  8. #68
    Warren Veteran daphnephoebe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MightyMax View Post
    There's been a very interesting and detailed reply posted to Frances's Facebook page which draws attention to the fact that sex hormones are involved in protection against osteoporosis. This is the same as for humans, which is why post-menopausal women are more at risk.

    Would there be an argument against neutering (males and females) on this basis?

    It's a balancing act - rabbits absorb a lot of calcium and can even suffer from an overload of it due to the way they metabolise it.
    Complicated subject in some ways, straight-forward in others
    That is an interesting argument. But I would have thought if the risk of osteoporosis was that much higher in neutered, that neutering wouldn't be advised as much.
    I guess the risk is increased when they are neutered too young... I guess it'd be a case of looking at hormone patterns depending on age, and neutering at the most suitable age for the species.
    Rather than neutering at an age deemed best for bonding, human relationships etc.

    Sent from my SM-G903F using Tapatalk
    Wooden indoor guinea pig / rabbit cage for sale in Cambridge : https://www.gumtree.com/p/pet-equipm...ils/1238281073

  9. #69
    Warren Scout Sharpie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MightyMax View Post
    That's really interesting Sharpie. It's good to hear other points of view.

    I don't know how the RWAF arrived at their figure of 80% - I've never seen the data or report on that.

    I hope you're well? When is your move?

    We're all good here
    Well the house has now completely sold, the new people move in tomorrow, so its just the process of money going to the new home, they reckon by the end of May we'll have brought the new house, so we can move in in June!!
    Excited but also nervous for the bunnies lol
    Hope you're well
    Yes, my bunnies are my children - in fact they're my Fluff Babies! <3

  10. #70
    Wise Old Thumper MightyMax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Akire View Post
    I would absolutely still have my female bunny spayed even if it turned out her chances of getting cancer are not as high. The risk is still there and it is a terrible way to die (not to mention totally preventable). I have volunteered at various rabbit rescues over the years and every single one does not adopt out unless the bunnies are fixed. Each rescue has had a couple rabbits die from spaying/neutering, but you have to remember they have hundreds of rabbits who have had the procedure. If you have a good rabbit savvy vet then chances of complications are extremely low. I would still spay because it helps promote responsible pet guardianship and is the solution to the overpopulation problem. Rabbits are the third most euthanized animal in shelters here in the US.

    Those are just my reasons

    And this in itself is an excellent reason to spay, regardless of the speculations on future health issues caused by spaying

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