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Thread: Rabbit Edibles

  1. #31
    Wise Old Thumper bluebunny's Avatar
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    What amonts should fruit and veg be given?

  2. #32
    Forum Buddy Kara's Avatar
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    Fruit should be kept to a minimal ie treats only, I give Cookie and Buggsy a tiny piece of apple a day and thats it on the fruit about the size of ummmmmmm 2.00 coin???? roughly!

    Veg depends on how big they are ie my two mini babies have a ramekin dish of dry food and two spring green leaves each, a handful of leaf mix and odds and sods of herbs, so for a bigger bunny I havent got a clue lol

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  3. #33

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    If used to it they can have a couple of mugs worth a day. It needs to be introduced/built up slowly though.

    Tam

  4. #34
    Warren Veteran bunnyhuggger's Avatar
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    Just had a thought and felt I'd better mention it cos there are some breeders using this forum.

    I believe that some herbs shouldn't be given to pregnant and lactating does, I'll try and find some information about this, unless anyone else can help.

    Also remember that herbs have medicinal properties as well. See:
    http://www.galens-garden.mcmail.com/...guinea_pig.htm
    Lynda


    C.A.R.R.O.T. (Care And Rehoming Rabbits Of Tayside)
    www.bunnyhugger.co.uk

  5. #35
    Wise Old Thumper
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    Thanks for the info about gas.. i didnt know about all that. I usually give mine a handfull of kale every other day but no probs so far.. will have to keep an eye on him
    Chris
    Chris
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  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by bunnyhuggger
    Can anyone confirm Chinese leaf and Pak Choy for us?
    I'm sure Pak Choy is OK to feed. I think somebody mentioned that on Tufty.

    Louise

  7. #37
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    [quote="bunnyhuggger"]Safe Food for Rabbits
    This list is to help discern safe foods for rabbits. It is not a guide to the nutitional value of these foods.
    Why not print it out so the whole family knows what give your rabbit.

    NOT SAFE:

    Bindweed


    Safe tree and shrub leaves:

    quote]

    According to Virginia Richardson in Rabbit Lopeadia BINDWEED is safe to feed. I feed it to my Rabbit's two/three tme's a week and I have done for the past few months with no probs.

    ANY desidious (TREE'S THAT DROP THERE LEAVE'S) tree leave's/branche's are OK to feed to Rabbit's except OAK and ELDER. Again this is quoting Virginia Richardson.

    My two love Rowan and Lime.

    Louise

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by bunnytales

    Could I ask your advice please - on a recent visit to my Vets when discussing diet I was told not to feed Banana as its too high in sugars and carbohydrates for bunnies tummies - have you found any probs -

    Cheers Mateys
    I feed Banana as an ocassional treat. I'm sure it is OK if you fed it fresh and in moderation. Banana is good way to get weight on a thin bunny.

    Louise

  9. #39
    Warren Veteran bunnyhuggger's Avatar
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    Thanks for your input Louise, this is what I mean about so many differing opinions on safe and unsafe food for buns. I'm no expert or authority on foods for rabbits, but I trawl the net for any information I can find. I copied that list from the reference address at the bottom of that particular post. There has been some debate before about bindweed, and I don't think there was any specific outcome. Some people don't even know what bindweed is or looks like anyway!

    If there is any doubt about what to feed your buns, err on the safe side and stick to foods you are confident with.
    Lynda


    C.A.R.R.O.T. (Care And Rehoming Rabbits Of Tayside)
    www.bunnyhugger.co.uk

  10. #40
    Warren Veteran bunnyhuggger's Avatar
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    Most Common Herbs Used for Rabbits
    Information contributed from members of the Herbal Rabbit group. Individual acknowledgements are shown.

    "Ideas are like rabbits. You get a couple and
    learn how to handle them and pretty soon, you have a dozen." John Steinbeck

    Basil
    Leaves can be rubbed on insect bites to reduce itching and inflammation. Leaves can also be taken as a warming and uplifting tonic for nervous exhaustion or any cold condition. The juice with an equal quantity of honey can be used for ringworm and itching skin. An infusion (tea) of Basil combined with Wood Betony can be given immediately after birthing to prevent a retained placenta or afterbirth. Cautions- do not use essential oils externally or internally. Harvest before flowering. ~ Cheryl



    "Comfrey
    Highly recommended for rabbits. It is a digestive aid, helps with wool block and is used for many other things. It is an old remedy which should under no circumstances be discounted. In extreme doses, comfrey can cause diarrehea. This is its effects working too hard and if left unnoticed, the rabbit may dehydrate. When used with common sense, Comfrey is one of the best herbs we can give the bunnies!" Rebecca

    Dandelion
    "Dandelion is an excellent food given fresh in unlimited quantities. Fermenting or wilted plants can cause bloat. Dandelions are one of the most nutritious food plants for rabbits. Being rich in protien and poor in fiber. The digestibility percentage is high at an estimated 70%. Well known for it's curative powers. The bitter milky sap stimulates the working of all glands, including the milk glands of lactating does. The plant has both laxative and astringent qualities and regulates constipation and diarrhea.

    Dandelion is good for many things in people and can be used for rabbits with these problems also: preventing osteoporosis (for the old bunny), bladder infections, lactating, liver problems, swelling, tonsilitis, warts, and pneumonia.

    I feed alot of Dandelion every day, especially to my babies and they just love it, but you have to be careful because that is all that they will want and won't eat their pellets. So I limit it to a few small handfuls a day." Cheryl

    Dandelion Made My Bunnies Glow With Health!
    "I have been giving my rabbits Dandelion leaves every morning for the last two weeks. Two (2) leaves to my Dwarfs and four (4) leaves to my Mini Rex and 6 to 8 leaves to my Flemish. After two weeks they all seem to glow! They are eating well, increased drinking, their fur is looking great and recovering from moult in fine fashion - not lingering in moulting for weeks and missing the shows. I now have a little "dandie" garden, because I can't believe the extreme changes with my concentrated efforts of daily dandelion leaves." Deanna

    Lavender
    Common Lavender - or - Narrow leaved Lavender - or - Lavender Spike (Lavendula augustfolia)
    "Lavender is not to be used lightly or frivously in breeding stock. It has a direct effect upon the uterus in helping to expel the contents, dead or alive, as well as being a diuretic. A late birthing doe will benefit from a little Lavender in order to naturally speed the process and it saves using drugs. The flowers are actually a mild tranquilizer, acting upon the heart in easing blood pressure rather than acting upon the brain as an anti-stimulant. In other words, good for a stressed out rabbit. Lavender Cotton (Abrotonum foemina, Chamaecyparissus) is a specific medicine for internal worms, and also assists the kidneys in cleansing and breaking up of stones. It also helps reduce swellings if applied outwardly, and is generally good taken internally for the liver, chest and uterus." Judy


    Lavender is analgesic or pain-relieving, anticonvulsive, anitdepressant, anitmicrobial, antirheumatic, antiseptic, anitspasmodic, antitoxic, gas-relieving, bile-stimulating, deodorant, diuretic, insect-repelling, relaxing, circulation-stimulating, tonic and worm-repelling. Effective against burns & scalds, neutralizes the venom of insect bites & stings.

    Lavender Oil - Inhaled or ingested, it treats respiratory conditions. Orally, it relieves nausea, prevents flatulence, alleviates cramping, improves digestion & clears urinary tract infections. Applied to the skin & coat, it helps repel insects & treats abscesses, fungal infections, ringworm, lice, scabies, sores, sunburn, dermatitis, earache, wounds & inflammation. Reduces anxiety & lifts the spirits.

    "I haven't tryed straight Lavendar Oil by mouth or used it that way on my rabbits. I have used it in apple cider vinegar or water. I have made Lavendar tea from the flowers to give my rabbits by mouth and I've sprinkled some of the flowers on top of their food. One of my books says to add 3 to 5 drops of the oil on a sugar cube and take twice a day orally. So you may want to duilte it with carrier oil, water, or apple cider vinegar." Patty

    Marjoram, Sweet (Majorana, Sampiucus, Amaracus)
    A diuretic, opens obstructions of the liver and spleen, is good for colic pains and for disorders of the head (whatever they are) and settles the nerves. ~ Judy

    Marjoram, Wild (Origanum Vulgare) For "colds"- although rabbits do not actually contract the headcold as we know it. Useful for coughs, pleurisy and obstruction of the lungs and uterus (take care here) and is also calming. This one, crushed and applied direct, will help control swellings and eruptions and bruises. Apparently the distilled oil of this will ease toothache. ~ Judy

    Mint
    Used for colds, eye inflammation, liver stimulant, and used to relax the muscles of the digestive tract and stimulate bile flow so are useful for indigestion, flatulence and colic and similar conditions. Reduces milk flow. Cautions are to avoid prolonged use, it can irritate the mucous membranes. Do not give any form of mint to young babies. To be harvested just before flowering. ~ Cheryl

    Plantain (Plantago spp.)Character: Slightly sweet, salty, and bitter; cool, mainly drying

    Leaves: Relaxing expectorant, tonify mucous membranes, reduce phlegm, antispasmodic, topically healing
    "The leaves soothe urinary tract infections and irritations. Good for gastric inflammations. Juice pressed from fresh leaves is given orally for inflamed mucous membranes in cystitis, diarrhea and lung infections. Use the juice for inflamations, sores, and wounds. Plantain does not cause digestive problems. The plant regulates the function of the intestines and is generally good for the mucous membranes. Useful in the diet of weanlings and can be harvested year around." Cheryl

    Rosemary

    Ideal for exhaustion, weakness, and depression. The arial parts (stems, leaves) invigorate the circulation, stimulate the digestion, and are good for cold conditions. Harvest fresh year-round. ~ Cheryl

    Sage
    Reduces lactation when weaning, digestive stimulant and a uterine stimulant. This herb should be used with caution and should be avoided during pregnancy. Sage contains Thujone, which can trigger fits in epileptics. ~ Cheryl

    Thyme
    The arial parts (stems, leaves) are ideal for deep-seated chest infections marked by thick yellow phlegm. They are also a useful digestive remedy, warming for stomache, chills and associated diarrhea (irritable bowel). Expels worms. Cautions are to avoid therapeutic doses of thyme and thyme oil in any form because the herb is a uterine stimulant. Thyme oil can irritate the mucous membranes, so dilute well. Harvest before and during flowering in summer; discard the woody stems. ~ Cheryl

    REFERENCE: http://www.healthypetcorner.com/rabbit.html
    Lynda


    C.A.R.R.O.T. (Care And Rehoming Rabbits Of Tayside)
    www.bunnyhugger.co.uk

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