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Thread: Safe fruit,veg and herbs for rabbits

  1. #1
    Wise Old Thumper little-laura's Avatar
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    Default Safe fruit,veg and herbs for rabbits

    There has been so many threads lately asking is this or that was safe for rabbits so I thought this would be a good idea

    Could it be made a sticky?



    Rabbits love their food and enjoy fresh fruits and vegetables as part of a balanced diet. The main part of a rabbit’s diet should be unlimited amounts of fresh hay (preferably Timothy or Meadow Hay), grass, and plenty of clean water available. See 'What do rabbits eat?' for more information.
    When introducing any new food, always do so slowly over a few weeks to avoid digestive upsets. Rabbits, like humans are all different and as such some may be unable to tolerate certain foods. Only give a small amount and wait for 24 hours, if your rabbit produces soft poo, withdraw the food and try with something else after everything has settled back to normal. Allow 5 - 7 days before making any other additions. Always wash food first and don't feed plants from roadsides or that contain pesticides.
    The first rule of feeding bunnies and their delicate tummies is: if in doubt - don't let them eat it! Rabbits have strong tastebuds and will try anything even if it's poisonous - it's up to you to protect them! The following list was taken from the RWAF website.
    Which vegetables can rabbits eat?
    A good guideline is to feed a minimum of 1 cup of vegetables for each 4 lbs of body weight per day.

    Artichoke leaves
    Asparagus
    Beetroot (care with leafy tops as high levels of oxalic acid)
    Broccoli (and its leaves, including purple sprouting varieties)
    Brussel Sprouts (leaves and sprouts)
    Cabbage (can sometimes cause digestive upsets)
    Carrots (& carrot tops) – not the roots as they are high in sugars
    Cauliflower (and the leaves)
    Celeriac
    Celery leaves
    Chicory
    Courgette (and flowers)
    Cucumber
    Curly Kale
    Fennel
    Green beans
    Kohl rabi
    Peas (including the leaves and pods)
    Peppers (red, green and yellow)
    Pumpkin
    Radish Tops
    Rocket
    Romaine lettuce (not Iceberg or light coloured leaf)
    Spinach (only occasional)
    Spring Greens
    Squash (e.g. Butternut)
    Swede
    Turnip (only occasional)
    Watercress

    Which fruits can rabbits eat?

    Fruits should be fed in moderation due to sugar content (up to 2 tablespoons worth per day).
    Do not feed the pips, stones, plants etc of fruits unless otherwise stated, as most of the time they are poisonous! Rabbits love sugary fruit and will eat too much of it, which is bad for them. Therefore it's up to you to limit it!
    Apple (not the pips - they are poisonous!)
    Apricot
    Banana (high in potassium)
    Blackberries (and leaves – excellent astringent properties)
    Blueberries
    Cherries (not the pits and plant - they contain cyanide and are therefore poisonous!)
    Grapes
    Kiwi Fruit
    Mango
    Melon
    Nectarines
    Oranges (not the peel)
    Papaya
    Peaches
    Pears
    Pineapple
    Plums
    Raspberries (and leaves – excellent astringent properties)
    Strawberries (and leaves)
    Tomatoes (NOT the leaves)

    Safe herbs for bunnies
    They can taste very strong so offer a little to start with to get your bunnies used to them.

    Basil
    Coriander
    Dill
    Mint (peppermint)
    Parsley
    Oregano
    Rosemary
    Sage
    Thyme

    Wild garden herbs, weeds and flowers that rabbits can eat

    Double-check which plants are in your garden before letting your bunnies loose!
    Borage
    Calendula
    Camomile
    Chickweed (astringent)
    Clover (leaves and flowers)
    Coltsfoot
    Comfrey
    Dandelion (diuretic properties)
    Goosegrass (cleavers) but may stick to coat!
    Lavender
    Mallow
    Nettle
    Nasturtium (leaves and flowers)
    Shepherd’s purse
    Sow Thistle
    Plantain
    Yarrow
    You can see a list of some poisonous plants by clicking here.

    This was taken from the save a fluff website
    Source: http://www.saveafluff.co.uk/rabbit-i...ds-for-rabbits

  2. #2
    Mama Doe
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    Thanks for the list. It says celery leaves but I've been feeding my bunnies the celery sticks too (chopped up because I read the stringy bits can wrap round their teeth) for a month with no problems. Is there any reason why you can't feed the celery itself? I'm sure I got it off another safe list somewhere. That's why it all gets so confusing!

  3. #3
    Wise Old Thumper little-laura's Avatar
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    Default Safe fruit,veg and herbs for rabbits

    It's not an all inclusive list there may be things they can have that's not on it and is on other lists but be wary if sites that have miss information

    You give them celery but some Bunnys in the past have chocked on them as they can get stringy so that's why some lists don't have them

  4. #4

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    Brilliant post, really useful, will print a copy out, thanks x

  5. #5
    Mama Doe
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    Quote Originally Posted by little-laura View Post
    It's not an all inclusive list there may be things they can have that's not on it and is on other lists but be wary if sites that have miss information

    You give them celery but some Bunnys in the past have chocked on them as they can get stringy so that's why some lists don't have them
    Ah ok thank you. I cut it up finely and they haven't had any problems so far, I will bear that in mind though. I've only had them a month so I'm still introducing things.

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    Mama Doe luna's Avatar
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    Great thread, can I ask why spinach is only to be given occasionally ? Is it to do with the calcium content or something else?

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  7. #7
    Young Bun dbownes's Avatar
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    got my boys today and this list has really helped me...thanks

    is it right that i can only feed em the pellets now and not the mix e.g russell rabbit??

  8. #8
    Moderator Zoobec's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbownes View Post
    got my boys today and this list has really helped me...thanks

    is it right that i can only feed em the pellets now and not the mix e.g russell rabbit??
    I would feed them the same food that they have been having at their previous home for a couple of weeks to allow them to settle in, then very gradually (over a couple of weeks ) start to change over to a pellet food . The changeover period is so that their stomachs don't get upset by sudden changes in diet .

  9. #9
    New Kit Lady Elf's Avatar
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    Default Perfect

    This has been brilliant for me. I have just used this while doing my online shop.

    My 2 girls have recently tried cucumber for the first time and they love it, plus cauliflower leaves.

    My next step is to try them on fruit as everywhere I read, rabbits love a bit of sugar. Now I know which fruits they can have.

    Thank you

  10. #10
    Warren Scout
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbownes View Post
    got my boys today and this list has really helped me...thanks

    is it right that i can only feed em the pellets now and not the mix e.g russell rabbit??
    The reason some people recommend pellets over the rabbit mixes is economics. With the mixes, rabbits just eat the bits they like and leave the rest, this upsets owners as they are throwing away "good" food and they think their rabbits are fussy eaters. They also worry that the rabbits are missing out on some essential nutrients if they don't wolf down all the muesli, all in one pellets eliminates that worry.

    The list is useful but I personally hate copied lists with all their copied "truths"
    For example "high sugar content", why did is it bad for them?
    Pips, yes do contain cyanide which is a poison, but the pips need to be cracked not whole to release the cyanide and can someone please tell me the fatal dose of pips otherwise it is just repeating "facts" by rote.
    Potassium in bananas, as a statement it means nothing. Potassium can affect the heart, but in what quantity?
    Anyone fancy explaining oxalic acid and its detrimental issues?

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