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Thread: Idiots guide on difference between Rearguard and Beaphar Fly Guard?

  1. #1
    Mama Doe
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    Default Idiots guide on difference between Rearguard and Beaphar Fly Guard?

    As title says, I really don't understand the difference between these two. I know it must be vast as one is prescription only (I assumed Rearguard was as can only get it at vets?) and there is a huge difference in price.

    For healthy bunnies, do either need to be applied?

    Advice welcomed
    Bunny mum to Jessie, Blue, Noah (trio), Sable, Dixie & Indy (trio) and River & Albie!
    Piggy mum to Mabel and Peaches


    Remembering Skye, Woody, Maisie-pig, Marley-pig and Molly-pig. Always in our hearts and very much missed

    Looking for welfare orientated bunny boarding in Hampshire? Visit www.chestnutcorner.co.uk or on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/chestnutcorner

  2. #2
    Wise Old Thumper
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    If your rabbit is healthy annd keeps herself clean then in my opinion you shouldn't need to use rearguard. It has chemicals in it which the rabbit would lick off. It's only for bunnies who get a messy bottom..

  3. #3
    Wise Old Thumper yvette's Avatar
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    If your bunny husbandry is great,then you dont need this stuff.

    Overweight,arthritic or sick bunnies need it as they are too podgy or ache too much to groom themselves.
    If they have bad teeth and sore mouth they might need it as they cant groom properly due to mouth and tooth problems.

    Ive never used it, not even on my disabled buns as I ensured cleanliness 24/7.

  4. #4
    Mama Doe
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    Yes I've read elsewhere that if you have a healthy bun you shouldn't need this so thanks for confirming - definitely won't be using either this summer .

    I however have always wondered what the differences are if I ever needed to use either in the future
    Bunny mum to Jessie, Blue, Noah (trio), Sable, Dixie & Indy (trio) and River & Albie!
    Piggy mum to Mabel and Peaches


    Remembering Skye, Woody, Maisie-pig, Marley-pig and Molly-pig. Always in our hearts and very much missed

    Looking for welfare orientated bunny boarding in Hampshire? Visit www.chestnutcorner.co.uk or on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/chestnutcorner

  5. #5
    Wise Old Thumper yvette's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by catherine09 View Post
    Yes I've read elsewhere that if you have a healthy bun you shouldn't need this so thanks for confirming - definitely won't be using either this summer .

    I however have always wondered what the differences are if I ever needed to use either in the future
    unsure.i presumed they were the same sort of thing.

  6. #6
    Warren Veteran RedFraggle's Avatar
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    The sprays you can just buy over the counter are insecticide (permethrin usually) based and are deisgned to kill on contact, so they attempt to kill the larvae/maggots once they have hatched.
    Cryomazine that is in Rearguard stops larval development and therefore prevents the eggs developing into larvae/maggots in the first place.

  7. #7
    Wise Old Thumper Snowberry's Avatar
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    I never use either as my two have fly screens over their runs so top them getting in and we just make sure we check them often.

  8. #8
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    Beaphar Fly Guard can be used to help protect -at risk- rabbits from flystrike, you can buy it without prescription. Rearguard is used on rabbits that have fly strike and may sometimes be used as a prevention, it's prescription only. If you think your rabbits are at risk speak to your vet and discuss the options. Beaphar Fly Guard is not a simple 'spot on' type treatment, you have to spray it over their rear end and work it in with your hands. The buns don't like this and they end up wet and have to clean themselves for a long time. I don't know of any particular risks from it but it's certainly stressful for them and so I wouldn't do it without a reason.
    Tim

  9. #9
    Mama Doe
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedFraggle View Post
    The sprays you can just buy over the counter are insecticide (permethrin usually) based and are deisgned to kill on contact, so they attempt to kill the larvae/maggots once they have hatched.
    Cryomazine that is in Rearguard stops larval development and therefore prevents the eggs developing into larvae/maggots in the first place.
    Ok - so am I right in thinking that both will kill the maggots/larvae associated with flystrike, but if Flyguard is used there is a chance that the maggots could start eating flesh (sorry to sound so graphic!) before they are killed? Whereas with Rearguard they will be killed before they get that chance?

    None of my bunnies are at risk of anything as they are all healthy but it's good to know for the future I like to learn
    Bunny mum to Jessie, Blue, Noah (trio), Sable, Dixie & Indy (trio) and River & Albie!
    Piggy mum to Mabel and Peaches


    Remembering Skye, Woody, Maisie-pig, Marley-pig and Molly-pig. Always in our hearts and very much missed

    Looking for welfare orientated bunny boarding in Hampshire? Visit www.chestnutcorner.co.uk or on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/chestnutcorner

  10. #10
    Warren Veteran RedFraggle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stator View Post
    Beaphar Fly Guard can be used to help protect -at risk- rabbits from flystrike, you can buy it without prescription. Rearguard is used on rabbits that have fly strike and may sometimes be used as a prevention, it's prescription only. If you think your rabbits are at risk speak to your vet and discuss the options. Beaphar Fly Guard is not a simple 'spot on' type treatment, you have to spray it over their rear end and work it in with your hands. The buns don't like this and they end up wet and have to clean themselves for a long time. I don't know of any particular risks from it but it's certainly stressful for them and so I wouldn't do it without a reason.
    That's not true, it's used as a preventative and not to treat a rabbit with flystrike.

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