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Thread: Any advice on Netherland Dwarf Bunnys?

  1. #1

    Default Any advice on Netherland Dwarf Bunnys?

    I am looking into getting a netherland dwarf bunny to keep in the house (as a house rabbit) does anyone have any basic infomation on them like what food is best, if a vet would neuter/spay them (because they are so small), are they good as house rabbits, ect,ect any advice would be great. Thanks

  2. #2
    Wise Old Thumper William's Avatar
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    Yes, they can be neutered/spayed. I have 2 nethie house buns myself and they're great. it depends more on personality than breed but overall I think nethies are sweet, friendly, funny little buns and mine are well behaved and so cute and innocent acting. I love nethies!

  3. #3
    Wise Old Thumper Santa's Avatar
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    I LOVE netherland dwarf bunnies, but there are some things that it would be useful for you to know before deciding on one as a house bunny, so it's great that you've asked

    Yes a vet will spay/neuter a nethie as long as they are in good health otherwise - they just use less anaesthetic so the smaller size doesn't really matter. My little Santa weighed around 900g most of her life and as well as her spay, she had multiple anaesthetics for dentals etc and never had a problem.

    Netherland dwarves are generally a little more skittish than some of the bigger breeds, who perhaps tend to be a little more relaxed. So if you have a noisy household with lots of hustle and bustle, that may not suit a little bunny very well who could get stressed and/or cause accidents by bolting around, but of course if you have a nice quiet household, it may be fine. Also, because they are so little, they do have a tendency to be able to get into all sorts of places that they're not supposed to be, so your bunny proofing will need to be absolutely top notch, as they will be able to wiggle through tiny spaces to chew on all those wires. Bad for you and could kill your bunny!

    I would also add that netherland dwarves are extremely active bunnies so please don't fall into the trap of thinking that a smaller bunny needs a smaller base, because it's just not true. If anything my netherland dwarves are much more lively and active than my bigger bunnies so actually need more space!

    Personally, I have to say that netherland dwarves would not be my breed of choice for a house rabbit. Although obviously there is going to be a lot of variation by individuals, on the whole I think they're a breed that is better suited to having a large, outdoor enclosure with a companion. I would also add that netherland dwarves tend to have more health problems than many other breeds, because bunnies are not "meant" to be that shape. The characteristics of netherland dwarves which make them so gorgeous - flat faces, tiny ears, tiny bunnies, are exactly the characteristics which make them so prone to chronic illnesses such as dental disease and snuffles. So if you choose this breed, please do be aware that you are more likely to end up with a bunny that needs ongoing veterinary treatment, so I would recommend a good insurance, although most insurances don't cover dental problems anyway. Of course you can never tell and to a certain extent it's the 'luck of the draw' on that, but there's just a higher chance so it's worth being aware of this in advance. You can minimise the chances of it happening (but not prevent it if it's genetic), by feeding bunny a diet very high in different hays as the main component of its diet, accompanied by a good quality bunny food such as bunny basics T or science selective, and a few veg. I personally would avoid foods aimed at dwarf bunnies (I seem to recall that burgess make one for junior and dwarf bunnies - too rich for an adult rabbit in my opinion).

    Having said that, it will of course vary by individual bunny, so why not see if you can find a local rescue where you can visit and see what bunnies they have. A good rescue knows their bunnies very well and will be able to find you a good match for your household. Added advantages of rescue bunnies are that they would already be neutered so you wouldn't need to worry about that, probably litter trained, and their personalities will already be known. It's very difficult to predict how any baby bunny is going to turn out when he/she grows up.

    Finally, I would add that bunnies are social creatures so I would recommend getting two bunnies. With the best will in the world, they're going to be on their own for the most part of the day and night and a companion of their own species is generally considered the kindest thing for them where possible.

    Gosh, that turned into a bit of an essay didn't it, sorry! Hope it helps, though
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  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by William View Post
    Yes, they can be neutered/spayed. I have 2 nethie house buns myself and they're great. it depends more on personality than breed but overall I think nethies are sweet, friendly, funny little buns and mine are well behaved and so cute and innocent acting. I love nethies!
    I am looking foward to getting one now Thanks!

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Santa View Post
    I LOVE netherland dwarf bunnies, but there are some things that it would be useful for you to know before deciding on one as a house bunny, so it's great that you've asked

    Yes a vet will spay/neuter a nethie as long as they are in good health otherwise - they just use less anaesthetic so the smaller size doesn't really matter. My little Santa weighed around 900g most of her life and as well as her spay, she had multiple anaesthetics for dentals etc and never had a problem.

    Netherland dwarves are generally a little more skittish than some of the bigger breeds, who perhaps tend to be a little more relaxed. So if you have a noisy household with lots of hustle and bustle, that may not suit a little bunny very well who could get stressed and/or cause accidents by bolting around, but of course if you have a nice quiet household, it may be fine. Also, because they are so little, they do have a tendency to be able to get into all sorts of places that they're not supposed to be, so your bunny proofing will need to be absolutely top notch, as they will be able to wiggle through tiny spaces to chew on all those wires. Bad for you and could kill your bunny!

    I would also add that netherland dwarves are extremely active bunnies so please don't fall into the trap of thinking that a smaller bunny needs a smaller base, because it's just not true. If anything my netherland dwarves are much more lively and active than my bigger bunnies so actually need more space!

    Personally, I have to say that netherland dwarves would not be my breed of choice for a house rabbit. Although obviously there is going to be a lot of variation by individuals, on the whole I think they're a breed that is better suited to having a large, outdoor enclosure with a companion. I would also add that netherland dwarves tend to have more health problems than many other breeds, because bunnies are not "meant" to be that shape. The characteristics of netherland dwarves which make them so gorgeous - flat faces, tiny ears, tiny bunnies, are exactly the characteristics which make them so prone to chronic illnesses such as dental disease and snuffles. So if you choose this breed, please do be aware that you are more likely to end up with a bunny that needs ongoing veterinary treatment, so I would recommend a good insurance, although most insurances don't cover dental problems anyway. Of course you can never tell and to a certain extent it's the 'luck of the draw' on that, but there's just a higher chance so it's worth being aware of this in advance. You can minimise the chances of it happening (but not prevent it if it's genetic), by feeding bunny a diet very high in different hays as the main component of its diet, accompanied by a good quality bunny food such as bunny basics T or science selective, and a few veg. I personally would avoid foods aimed at dwarf bunnies (I seem to recall that burgess make one for junior and dwarf bunnies - too rich for an adult rabbit in my opinion).

    Having said that, it will of course vary by individual bunny, so why not see if you can find a local rescue where you can visit and see what bunnies they have. A good rescue knows their bunnies very well and will be able to find you a good match for your household. Added advantages of rescue bunnies are that they would already be neutered so you wouldn't need to worry about that, probably litter trained, and their personalities will already be known. It's very difficult to predict how any baby bunny is going to turn out when he/she grows up.

    Finally, I would add that bunnies are social creatures so I would recommend getting two bunnies. With the best will in the world, they're going to be on their own for the most part of the day and night and a companion of their own species is generally considered the kindest thing for them where possible.

    Gosh, that turned into a bit of an essay didn't it, sorry! Hope it helps, though
    Thanks for the great infomation it was really helpful I am looking foward to getting one now.

  6. #6
    Wise Old Thumper *lily*'s Avatar
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    I had a freerange housebunny called Tinkerbell. She was full of life and very, very friendly.

    I miss her very much and would love another someday

  7. #7
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    I love my nethies and their very cheeky personality. I have several indoors and several outdoors and oooh, I just love them.

    The one thing I have noticed in working with a lot of breeds and rabbits in general is that they seem to be more of a challenge to bond with other rabbits; not all the time, but some of the time, and seem to be very picky about partners. Again though, that comes down to individual bunnies.
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  8. #8
    Wise Old Thumper ripminnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sky-O View Post
    I love my nethies and their very cheeky personality. I have several indoors and several outdoors and oooh, I just love them.

    The one thing I have noticed in working with a lot of breeds and rabbits in general is that they seem to be more of a challenge to bond with other rabbits; not all the time, but some of the time, and seem to be very picky about partners. Again though, that comes down to individual bunnies.
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  9. #9
    Wise Old Thumper Blackberry & Co's Avatar
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    I love nethies

    Mine are outdoor buns, with hutches inside an aviary so that they are never confined in a small space - they loooove having a lot of space to run around in!

    The are wonderful characters, very nosey, love being up high, but they do tend to have more teeth and tummy troubles than larger breeds, so you need to do some research into dental symptoms, costs of treatment for dentals, stasis etc before you commit to having a nethie.

    Hope you find a bunny (or pair of buns ) to suit you


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    Wise Old Thumper janice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sky-O View Post
    I love my nethies and their very cheeky personality. I have several indoors and several outdoors and oooh, I just love them.

    The one thing I have noticed in working with a lot of breeds and rabbits in general is that they seem to be more of a challenge to bond with other rabbits; not all the time, but some of the time, and seem to be very picky about partners. Again though, that comes down to individual bunnies.
    That is interesting that you say this, I have had the same experience in the past, I always wondered if it was just me who had this thought.
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