Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: poss treatment for buns with coccidia?

  1. #1
    Warren Veteran
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    horndean ,hampshire
    Posts
    7,751

    Default poss treatment for buns with coccidia?

    have been searching around the internet for different doses of different things to kill instead of control to give a rabbits immune system to make the right antibodies.

    for chickens theres even a vaccination for it!!

    some countries are using baycox with ivermectin...!!?

    One expert in the states is using baycox and ponazuril !?

    ------------------------------

    The traditional medications are called "coccidostats" meaning that they interfere with coccidian reproduction. Coccidia are not killed by these medications but the cessation of reproduction buys time for the host's own immune system to respond and have fewer organisms to defeat. The host depends on a competant immune system to cure the infection and the time required to remove the infection is highly dependent on the number of organisms already present when treatment begins.

    Ponazuril represents a new approach to treatment. Ponazuril actually kills the coccidia which makes for a faster response to treatment and shorter course of therapy.
    ----------------------------------------------------------

    also the mix of panacur and ponzaruril has been effective to treat EC
    and coccidiosis

    Our vets dose Panacur at 20mg/kg once per day, and ponazuril at 20-50mg/kg once per day, using it 7 days for coccidiosis, and 30 days for E. cuniculi.
    dana krempel.
    -----------------------------------------------------------

    this is used in dogs.....i wonder if any papers have been written about use perhaps for rabbits?


    Treating Coccidiosis with Diclazuril

    Diclazuril is a benzeneacetonitrile derivative that is often used as an oral suspension medication. It has been reported that scientists don't exactly know why this medicine is so successful at treating coccidiosis, as it doesn't kill the actual protozoa, but they have seen that it doesn't allow dogs to shed parasitic eggs when infected. Therefore, the cycle of the parasitic colony living within a dog eventually comes to a stop. The use of this medication can also reduce the amount of intestinal lesions that the protozoa parasites may cause in a dog.

    ---------------------------------------------------

    Anti-coccidiostats (ACS) are drugs included in some rabbit foods that suppress (not cure) intestinal coccidiosis, and don't work on hepatic cocci at all. Overwhelming coccidiosis infection can develop if animals are changed onto non-ACS food, because the coccidiosis can then multiply uncontrolled. Fanciers using ACS pellets as part of a home-mixed ration will be feeding ineffective concentrations anyway. ACS foods are fine as the sole diet of commercial rabbits with a limited lifespan, but for fancy and pet rabbits they cause more problems than they solve and are not recommended. Instead of continuous low-dose ACS drugs in the feed, there may be benefit from using a more potent anti-coccidial drug two or more times a year. Discuss with your vet.



    -------------------------------------------------------------



    its hard because its hepatic coccidia.........
    Debbie

  2. #2
    Warren Veteran
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    horndean ,hampshire
    Posts
    7,751

    Default

    oh common guys...im not having another ignore my thread day am i?

    just wondered if those whod attended the lectures etc had heard of these ideas/treatments as opposed to sulfa based treatments or baycox alone?
    Debbie

  3. #3
    Wise Old Thumper Jack's-Jane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    At Home
    Posts
    102,193

    Default

    I have only used Septrin or Borgal


    Lop Rabbit Owners- I Need Your Help Please...........

    http://forums.rabbitrehome.org.uk/sh...16#post6379116

  4. #4
    Alpha Buck
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Birmingham
    Posts
    728

    Default

    Baycox (toltrazuril) is effective
    RCVS Certificate and Diploma Holder in Zoological Medicine
    Manor Vets,
    Edgbaston, Birmingham
    www.manorvets.co.uk/exotic-pets

  5. #5
    Wise Old Thumper Santa's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    The grotto
    Posts
    11,315

    Default

    My understanding (which could well be incorrect!) is that ponazuril is one of the metabolites of toltrazuril (baycox) so it's pretty much the same as giving toltrazuril because that's what it is metabolised to anyway?

    I have only really heard toltrazuril being advocated - with it specifically being emphasised that the doses in the FHB book are incorrect and when given at the correct dose it is effective without the side-effects reported at higher doses.
    Rabbits are cheap and easy pets to look after badly.

  6. #6
    Warren Veteran
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    horndean ,hampshire
    Posts
    7,751

    Default

    thank you......

    yes my vet used the lower dose of baycox.....but bluebells still shedding oocytes BUT the lab say they cannot tell if its the one type of emiriae (ive mispelt it i know.....please forgive that!) thats the one that causes hepatic coccidiosis..or the several that cause the intestinal ones

    and yes me being a numptey..the rabbits cannot infect themselves by eating their cecals..or even their own poops..until those poops are 48hrs old..it takes that long to be infective

    hopefully i can get hold of one of our vets tomorrow to ask if theyve got richard saunders to get back to them.
    Debbie

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •