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Thread: Im drying loads of herbs for winter! 2010 Forageing Thread

  1. #401
    Mama Doe abi2047's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thumps_ View Post
    I was the last one in & hadn't got my key. The guys leaving mustn't have seen me & locked the gate!! I go there to get weeds for my bun. I was only just tall enough to make it though, & thought I must have looked hilariously funny. I was a good tree climber as a youngster, & just knew that it had to come in useful one day.
    Ohhh, Im still a kid well a teen but I love climbing trees Was it on a busy road? Did alot of people see you climbing the gate?

  2. #402
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    Quote Originally Posted by abi2047 View Post
    Ohhh, Im still a kid well a teen but I love climbing trees Was it on a busy road? Did alot of people see you climbing the gate?
    No the gate's round the back. I might have been arrested if the wrong people had seen me. We have to be very understanding to go to allotments. The plot holders work incredibly hard to grow veg & have to carry every bucket of water from a trough to keep the veg alive in drought. Then they get them stolen. Hence the locked gate. You can't just walk in there & start weeding. You're best to stick to the fields. I get most of my stuff fom the grassy tracks & fields round here.

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    Wise Old Thumper hurricanhoney's Avatar
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    2 more bags of plantain today at the graveyard At least I didn't fall in a grave again this time


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  4. #404
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    Quote Originally Posted by hurricanhoney View Post
    2 more bags of plantain today at the graveyard At least I didn't fall in a grave again this time
    Thank you so much for that hurricanehoney. Priceless!

  5. #405
    Mama Doe Maizy's Avatar
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    Definitely not too late for foraging, I'm still getting hazel, birch, plantains vetches, hawkbit, dandelion, chamomile, mallow, trefoils, trifolium, blackberry and yarrow.
    I can also confirm that contorted hazel is definitely ok. I have two of them in my garden along with two purple hazels and the buns 'love em'!
    Like Thumps I have a bun who has to be on a pure hedgerow diet and I am very thankful that she continues to thrive. It's true, that buns ( like a lot of animals) will instinctively home in on plants that they know will provide them with what their body needs. I like to give Petal fresh for as long as possible so do move some of my calendula and other flowering plants into the greenhouse to extend the flowering season and did manage to keep her on fresh for almost 10 months before resorting to the dried supplies last year. Am hoping I'll be doing the same this year too.

  6. #406
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    Maizy, thank you for joining us. Can you tell me of any wild plants rich in iron?

  7. #407
    Wise Old Thumper prettylupin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maizy View Post
    Definitely not too late for foraging, I'm still getting hazel, birch, plantains vetches, hawkbit, dandelion, chamomile, mallow, trefoils, trifolium, blackberry and yarrow.
    I can also confirm that contorted hazel is definitely ok. I have two of them in my garden along with two purple hazels and the buns 'love em'!
    Like Thumps I have a bun who has to be on a pure hedgerow diet and I am very thankful that she continues to thrive. It's true, that buns ( like a lot of animals) will instinctively home in on plants that they know will provide them with what their body needs. I like to give Petal fresh for as long as possible so do move some of my calendula and other flowering plants into the greenhouse to extend the flowering season and did manage to keep her on fresh for almost 10 months before resorting to the dried supplies last year. Am hoping I'll be doing the same this year too.
    I see you are literally just up the road from me Where do you do your foraging may I ask? Here in the city centre we're restricted to the city cemetery beside Southampton Common, or finding the odd hazel tree in the new forest. Other than that the best places are beside the river up at Brambridge but that is quite a drive and we really only ever do that in summer. Our allotment has only recently been accquired and rotavated so nothing there either now.
    Would be grateful for any recommended local good foraging sites between Soton/Romsey/Winchester. The New Forest is pretty bare for bunny goodies.

    BTW don't you mean contorted willow not hazel? I've always called it Corkscrew willow - we too have fed this after my dad's was felled in a storm.

  8. #408
    Mama Doe Maizy's Avatar
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    Hi Thumps To be honest the obvious 'leafy green veg' is what immediately springs to mind, Spinnach being top of the list. The wild food iron content is likely to vary and be influenced by the soil mineral content in the localised area; just as it is with the potency levels in all plants. In addition the levels are likely to fluctuate with the life stages so it might be great in Spring, but not in the Autumn. It would be very difficult to predict accurately without laboratory analysis, but you could hazard a guess maybe by what is growing in the immediate area. Anything with chlorosis is an obvious candidate for deficiency, so I think a good rule of thumb is the dark green leaf. Things like malva sylvestris, which is a nice plant in early summer ( but does have a tendency to get rust ) is still around now so that might be worth a try. Measuring mineral content is definitely a bit of a tricky one.
    Last edited by Maizy; 24-10-2010 at 02:40 AM.

  9. #409
    Mama Doe Maizy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prettylupin View Post
    I see you are literally just up the road from me Where do you do your foraging may I ask? Here in the city centre we're restricted to the city cemetery beside Southampton Common, or finding the odd hazel tree in the new forest. Other than that the best places are beside the river up at Brambridge but that is quite a drive and we really only ever do that in summer. Our allotment has only recently been accquired and rotavated so nothing there either now.
    Would be grateful for any recommended local good foraging sites between Soton/Romsey/Winchester. The New Forest is pretty bare for bunny goodies.

    BTW don't you mean contorted willow not hazel? I've always called it Corkscrew willow - we too have fed this after my dad's was felled in a storm.
    Hiya

    I tend to stay very local so forage here in Chandlers Ford and Romsey. There are some pathways and hedgerow plus I am near to woodland and a lovely bit of empty field that has been left to meadow, which is where I tend to get most of my vetch and the trefoils.

    I did mean contorted hazel Corylus Avellana Contorta ( also known as the corkscrew hazel) but you are right there is a contorted willow, which can get huge! Salix matsudana 'Tortuosa'

    PS/ I would add that we are lucky in that the local planting is lots of hazel, some birch and plenty of nettles and bramble, when the local authority aren't butchering it! I would have thought the Forest would be a haven for it?
    Last edited by Maizy; 24-10-2010 at 02:36 AM.

  10. #410
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    Yes, the area around here is amazingly complex geologically. The immediate locality is Jurassic red clay at the surface & which is very rich in iron.

    My rabbit has shown me something about blackthorn leaves. He's starting to get better. The trouble is, that I suspect but do not know that they may be high in tannins & bind protein & iron, which is no prob short term, but he'll need the blackthorn long term. However he does eat much more dark green ribwort plantain when he's in a blackthorn eating phase.
    Unfortunately he won't touch any human veg now.

    Thank you for that, I'll get more ribwort nearer home.

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