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Monkey
31-01-2007, 04:35 PM
Not that i do this but someone i know feeds their bun potatoes!? Aren't they poisoness?

Apparently the bun loves them? :?

toffee
31-01-2007, 04:49 PM
I know they're poisonous raw (as they are to us). I don't know if it makes a difference if they're cooked?

Monkey
31-01-2007, 05:01 PM
They're raw? I don't get how the bunny isn't made poorly?

kitschkitty
31-01-2007, 05:28 PM
http://www.smallanimalsboarding.co.uk/rabbits_rodents_boarding.htm they say they give bunnies raw potato :shock:

As I understand it potato plants contain toxins, I guess it depends on how much raw potato you eat as to how much you will be affected, I know that the reason you must avoid potatoes that have turned green is that they contain higher levels of the toxins, Excessive ingestion of raw potato can produce gastro-intestinal, liver, as well as heart damage.

Also when considering cooked potatoes you still have to consider the high starch levels.

Tamsin
31-01-2007, 05:34 PM
Potato peel is about the only veg offcuts my buns don't get to recycle (eat).

Tam

cavysrock
31-01-2007, 05:50 PM
i know poorly guinea pigs can have mashed potatoe every months ( a tiny bit ) and people give their piggies potatoe peelings, just not potatoe

purplebumble
31-01-2007, 11:02 PM
with my first ever house bun..she used to beg for bits of crunchy baked potato skin (without butter or salt!) And she survived godnes only knows how cos i also gave her the odd bit of a corn ear greenery an all and she loved it..till i leanred what corn was..full of calcium and indigestible but she had a terribly bad molarjaw prob and i loved her for 18 months when the vet said she should have been dead by the time she was 3 months old..
with that and pinching my daughters dinner one night and sampling the cat food once..im surprised she lived that long..RIP Kibbles..the psycho doe..

BirdieBun
01-02-2007, 10:56 AM
well my house bun bambi loves beans and mash. i dont know about raw spuds.

raw spuds aren't poisonous to humans though :?

Bavarian Bunny
01-02-2007, 11:07 AM
Only the green bits of potato contain the toxin, the production is induced by light. White/yellow potatoes mainly contain starch, that should not be dangerous. I've never fed my bunnies potatoes, though.

Found this on Wikipedia:

Solanine in potatoes
Solanine occurs naturally in all nightshades, including tomatoes, Capsicum, tobacco and Eggplant, as well as plants from other species. However the most ingested solanine is from the consumption of potatoes.

Potatoes naturally produce solanine and chaconine, a related glycoalkaloid, as a defense mechanism against insects, disease, and predators. Potato leaves and stems are naturally high in glycoalkaloids.

When potato tubers are exposed to light, they turn green and increase glycoalkaloid production. This is a natural defense to help prevent the uncovered tuber from being eaten. The green colour is from chlorophyll, and is itself harmless. However, it is an indication that increased level of solanine and chaconine may be present.

Some diseases, such as potato blight, can dramatically increase the levels of glycoalkaloids present in potatoes. This is believed to be a natural reaction of the plant in response to disease and damage.

Commercial varieties of potatoes are screened for solanine levels, and most have a solanine content of less than 0.2mg/g. However potatoes that have been exposed to light and started to green can show concentrations of 1mg/g or more. In these situations a single unpeeled potato can result in a dangerous dose.


[edit] Avoidance
Solanine and chaconine are present in potato shoots. In potato tubers 30–80% of the solanine develops in and under the skin and thus may be removed by peeling and removing the eyes. This is advisable if the tubers show green, but is not a guarantee of safety. Potato greening strongly suggests solanine build-up although each process can occur without the other. A bitter taste in a potato may be a more reliable indicator of toxicity.

Deep-frying potatoes at 170° C (306° F) will effectively lower glycoalkaloid levels, but microwaving is only somewhat effective and boiling is not.

kitschkitty
01-02-2007, 01:10 PM
with my first ever house bun..she used to beg for bits of crunchy baked potato skin (without butter or salt!) And she survived godnes only knows how cos i also gave her the odd bit of a corn ear greenery an all and she loved it..till i leanred what corn was..full of calcium and indigestible but she had a terribly bad molarjaw prob and i loved her for 18 months when the vet said she should have been dead by the time she was 3 months old..
with that and pinching my daughters dinner one night and sampling the cat food once..im surprised she lived that long..RIP Kibbles..the psycho doe..

I imagine baked potato skin would actually be the healthiest option/part for buns as the skin contains the most nutrients, baking is the best method of cooking it and it's pretty tasty too! :D

his nibs & sox
01-02-2007, 05:28 PM
I have read they are poisonous to buns too, so when sox and nibs managed to somehow sneak into the kitchen unnoticed one day and I caught sox eating a whole banana out of the fruit stand (sitting on top of it) and nibs in the bin eating potato peels, I nearly died!! I thought that was going to be it and i'd loose him, god I watched the little horror like a hawk that night! I'm sure they do it just wind us up and get more attention (if that is possible) :lol: