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View Full Version : A Rescue Who WILL Rehome a SINGLE House Rabbit if....



Jack's-Jane
15-01-2007, 08:33 AM
......the Rabbit is suited to such circumstances.

Scrool down to 'Loopy' on here

http://www.bobtailsrescue.org.uk/adopt_rabbit.asp


:D :D

Janex

honeybunny
15-01-2007, 08:45 AM
Aww I have homed a bun to be a singleton twice. In the first instance the bun in question attacked, very badly ,3 different does he was offered as a wife :( He went to a home with lots of space and toys, as well as , of course, attention.
the 2nd bun was Mickey who, like Loopy, craved human attention. He is also VERY short sighted. He went as a housebun with a couple who will spoil him....but they have promised to try to bond him sometime in the not too distant future :D
If a home had been offered for Patch (now at RB), or Bambi..the older ladies, I would have let them go as singletons to homes with people there all day....so it is possible to come across single buns from rescues. :D

Spacegirl
15-01-2007, 08:47 AM
I don't think this is so unusual, is it? I tink the majority of rescues will consider a bun going as a singleton in certain cases, particularly if it is going to be a house bun and it has some sort of history that means it may suit the rabbit better.

Tamsin
15-01-2007, 10:03 AM
Most rescues will make exceptions if it's in the best interests of the rabbits e.g. the rabbit cannot be paired up. Another example: http://www.rabbitrehome.org.uk/moreinfo.asp?RabID=6432

If rabbits stayed in social groups from birth I don't think they'd be a problem with living with other rabbits but often they are seperated at what maybe a very young age, kept without companionship or may be neglected. I'm surprised really that there aren't more that there are difficulties pairing up. I think it's a testiment to how social rabbits are that you can take a five year old rabbit that's not seen another bunny since it was 8 weeks old and on most occations successfully pair them up.

Azraelm
15-01-2007, 10:31 AM
i thought quite a few rescues will actually rehome single bunns?
I've personally come across a couple.

Snowy
15-01-2007, 10:36 AM
We rehome single buns if the circumstances are right!

Is this unusual then??

Jack's-Jane
15-01-2007, 10:42 AM
We rehome single buns if the circumstances are right!

Is this unusual then??

Well there had been some discussion about it in the past and some people had very fixed views about never re-homing single Bunnies. Or only re-homing a single Bun to go with a Bun the adopter already has Its great that it is not impossible to be able to rehome a single Bun from a rescue if it is appropriate for a particular Bunny :D

Janex

bunnymadhouse
15-01-2007, 10:47 AM
we have a single bunny here waiting for an indoor home on his own . :D

janice
15-01-2007, 10:57 AM
ARC only will rehome a single rabbit if it is to be a houserabbit and their owners either work from home or if they are around the majority of the time.

Suzi Wong
15-01-2007, 11:08 AM
My Oscar is a single bun, but there is ALWAYS someone here with him.
I even take the children on holidays without my hubby and he stays at home with Oscar :lol: :lol: :lol: I couldn't trust leaving him with anyone else :D

Jack's-Jane
15-01-2007, 11:14 AM
My Oscar is a single bun, but there is ALWAYS someone here with him.
I even take the children on holidays without my hubby and he stays at home with Oscar :lol: :lol: :lol: I couldn't trust leaving him with anyone else :D

Two Bucks home alone !!! I bet they have a great time :lol: :lol:

Janex

Karly
15-01-2007, 11:20 AM
After having single buns and pairs/trios, I'm glad rescues will only rehome single buns as an exception. I feel buns are far happier in pairs or groups - afterall, naturally they'd have companions. I feel that as owners it's our responsibility to provide the best we can. If we can't provide a sociable animal with suitable company then I think you should go for a different animal that you can meet the needs of.
I mean, how can you look at this and say bunnies don't need company ;)
http://www.fluffyrat.net/triosnuggled.jpg

honeybunny
15-01-2007, 11:22 AM
Karly I quite agree and that pic is lovely :D

Karly
15-01-2007, 11:30 AM
I also think rescues are kind of responsible for setting a standard. You can't go around claiming that bunnies are best in pairs and then turn around and routinely rehome them singly. Lots of people (not just in the rabbit community) ask why rescues are so fussy, and that they're wrong to 'doom' the animals to life in the rescue rather than make a compromise on the home they go to (slightly smaller housing than standard, going singly, going to someone with more pets than they have time with, going to someone who's away a lot, etc). Yes, you could rehome them to these and increase your "turnover" but if you make an exception for one person then you have to do it for everyone, and then these boundaries will be pushed too, and you'll be encroaching on what's best for the animals. If you stick to your guns, people will have to change and slowly it will become more and more accepted that your regulations are just what the animal deserves - space, companionship, attention, etc.

Spacegirl
15-01-2007, 11:42 AM
I also think rescues are kind of responsible for setting a standard. You can't go around claiming that bunnies are best in pairs and then turn around and routinely rehome them singly. Lots of people (not just in the rabbit community) ask why rescues are so fussy, and that they're wrong to 'doom' the animals to life in the rescue rather than make a compromise on the home they go to (slightly smaller housing than standard, going singly, going to someone with more pets than they have time with, going to someone who's away a lot, etc). Yes, you could rehome them to these and increase your "turnover" but if you make an exception for one person then you have to do it for everyone, and then these boundaries will be pushed too, and you'll be encroaching on what's best for the animals. If you stick to your guns, people will have to change and slowly it will become more and more accepted that your regulations are just what the animal deserves - space, companionship, attention, etc.

Absolutely right :D

Jack's-Jane
15-01-2007, 11:50 AM
I agree that Rabbits need companions of their own kind. I was not suggesting otherwise :D
I am just pleased most rescues also take into account 'special circumstances' :D :D :D :D

Janex

Karly
15-01-2007, 12:08 PM
I agree that Rabbits need companions of their own kind. I was not suggesting otherwise :D
I am just pleased most rescues also take into account 'special circumstances' :D :D :D :D

Janex

Not aimed at you Jane - we don't have to worry about you having a single bun :lol:
Just that I've seen recently a lot of people (as said, not just bunny people) moaning at rescues for not making exceptions to their rules. Rescues are almost always about the bigger picture too - yes you could concentrate on rehoming as many animals as possible, and 'save' more animals in need but I think realistically rather than deal with the backlash of problems, you need to tackle them head on and start the change for yourself. If people are told by rescues that such and such needs to be done before they can adopt an animal, hopefully people will go away with a new opinion and do the changes necessary - and more importantly, pass this info on to friends and family as well.

maxwell
15-01-2007, 01:48 PM
Hi I am NEW. I haven’t introduced myself because my rabbits passed away lately. So disn’t see the point.

I have to agree and disagree. I really don’t think it’s up to the customer to change. The supplier HAS to change for the customer, its how it’s always been. If you can’t change for your customers they will go somewhere else as there is always competition. I don’t have a problem with either paired or single rabbits as I have had them all. I am 43 years of age and lived with rabbits all my life, and having kept rabbits together from birth have often found at least one that didn’t get along with the group, and therefore had to be single. I will say though, that most single rabbits will form a special bond with their human friends more then rabbits together. Rabbits will often look at their human friend as their own species and won’t really know otherwise. The only type of rabbit that gets a little nervous is the more timid ones; however I have found these to be slightly timed no matter what you do.

I have read so much on this forum over the past few weeks, and I can’t say I have ever seen a “wrong” post.

Maxwell :)

Tamsin
15-01-2007, 02:00 PM
I agree that supply-demand applies to a certain extent but a rescues aim is not the same as a businesses. For example a petshop is a business. The more they sell the more cash they make so they try to meet their customers wants. The customer wants cheap and convenient in general they won't pay £60 for a neutered/vacced rabbit because they can get a standard rabbit for £20 and don't see the 'extra features' as desirable.

A rescue on the other hand isn't working for profits, in fact they usually make a loss. Their goal is to find an excellent home for each individual bunny. That means they have higher standards and certainly a smaller customer base but as profit isn't their goal it's not a point anyway.

It is a bit of a juggle though because rescues do want to increase their customer base but not at the cost of lowering their standards. So if you can't change your product you have to make your customers want the product you're offering. We need to rebrand rabbits so that 'extra features' become so desirable people will pay a premium and provide the extra care they need or they'll decide that they don't want a bunny at all.

I think part of the issue is that people currently have a misconception about what they are buying. for example they don't realise how much maintence costs are.

Rescues are often pretty useless at advertising themselves, it would be fun to see what the PR/Brand consultants big companies employ could do with them :D

Karly
15-01-2007, 02:03 PM
Rescues aren't businesses and owners aren't consumers though :? This is another thing rescues have to battle with - animals aren't the latest toys or gadgets that can be returned or discarded when the children are bored or you're fed up of cleaning them out. It's not a case of competing with petshops or breeders, but educating people into why they should rescue, and the correct care. I find it horrible when people refer to animals as products - they're living things!
I'm not saying every rabbit will definately get along with another rabbit, I'm saying rescues shouldn't rehome single rabbits as a regular thing as this will encourage people to do it with other rabbits, regardless of whether they'll get along with others or not. Lots of people do things wrong with their animals because petshops have told or shown them that it's "OK", we need rescues to set the right example - who else will if not them?

doorkeeper
15-01-2007, 02:19 PM
My customers are the rabbits and guinea pigs. They come to me looking for homes and I supply what they need. Some people don't understand that I am looking for homes for animals, not supplying them with pets :wink: If people go away without a rabbit hopefully I have managed to educate them to some extent in the process which can only benefit rabbits in general.
I am not going to compromise on standards or it defeats the purpose.
I have never yet found a rabbit I couldn't find a partner for. I'm stubborn, and am prepared to wait as long as it takes. There will be no single rabbits rehomed from here.

Karly
15-01-2007, 02:26 PM
That's another valid point Louise - lots of people will just give up bonding. I had 3 males living very happily together (those in the photo) and have also had great success introducing very aggressive rats to other rats with neutering (rats can get hormonal aggression) and lots of patience and the right ratties.

Angie65
15-01-2007, 02:30 PM
That's another valid point Louise - lots of people will just give up bonding. I had 3 males living very happily together (those in the photo) and have also had great success introducing very aggressive rats to other rats with neutering (rats can get hormonal aggression) and lots of patience and the right ratties.

I agree - but I'm quite brave with bonding. However I can understand why someone might not try again if they see real damage being done. My bity-bun Calel, was actually really easy to bond, but seeing his psycho moments, if he had done that directed at a bun (instead of me :roll: ), i wouldn't have tried bonding him again. Luckily, he liked the only available spayed girl i had :lol:

janice
15-01-2007, 02:35 PM
Totally agree that like with humans there is a partner for every rabbit or piggie. I have just managed to pair up an older female piggie with a nice boyfriend, this was my eleventh partner I tried :roll: Somtimes you need to wait for the right partner for them. I have never found any rabbit I have not managed to find a partner for.

honeybunny
15-01-2007, 02:45 PM
I agree if you keep trying then you can find a partner..but in the case of the bun I rehomed as a single after 3 failed attempts..he actually wounded 2 of the 3 and I wasn't willing to risk another..... but my polcicy has been 99% no single buns :D

Jack's-Jane
15-01-2007, 03:01 PM
I agree if you keep trying then you can find a partner..but in the case of the bun I rehomed as a single after 3 failed attempts..he actually wounded 2 of the 3 and I wasn't willing to risk another..... but my polcicy has been 99% no single buns :D

Seems perfectly reasonable to me as the next failed bond could have ended in one or more seriously injured (or worse :shock: ) Rabbits.
I have a very low panic threshold with bonding but its not without reason. I had one Doe who almost lost her life in a bonding fight. I am just not prepared to risk that sort of injury (throat/genitals torn) again.

Janex

Karly
15-01-2007, 03:07 PM
I think you have to weigh up risks to benefits though. For example, is it worth avoiding all the stress and potential injuries of bonding for a bun to have to spend 7-10+ years alone when it could really get along well with another bun (or more than one)
You could apply this to anything - should you allow your buns outside incase they contract myxi, should you ever bring anymore buns into your house incase they have something contagious, should you introduce new veg incase it causes a bad upset tummy or even bloat, should you give them a new toy incase they get their foot stuck/ingest some and damage their throat or stomach or get a blockage, etc.

Jack's-Jane
15-01-2007, 03:16 PM
I think you have to weigh up risks to benefits though. For example, is it worth avoiding all the stress and potential injuries of bonding for a bun to have to spend 7-10+ years alone when it could really get along well with another bun (or more than one)
You could apply this to anything - should you allow your buns outside incase they contract myxi, should you ever bring anymore buns into your house incase they have something contagious, should you introduce new veg incase it causes a bad upset tummy or even bloat, should you give them a new toy incase they get their foot stuck/ingest some and damage their throat or stomach or get a blockage, etc.

Exactly, its a PERSONAL choice based on risk assessment.

Janex

Karly
15-01-2007, 03:30 PM
That's the nice thing about bunny keeping though, everyone has different opinions. If everyone kept their bunnies in the same way then nothing would change as we'd all think we were right. By people having different opinions, people put research into things rather than taking someone's word for it (because if someone told you bunnies MUST live alone then someone told you they love company, you're going to research to find out who's right) and more is learnt :) For example, I no longer use woodshavings with any of my animals. I know lots of bunny owners still do, but through owning rats and learning about it there, I've decided it's not worth the risk (as the phenols in the shavings affect the liver - it even affects humans who work around woodshavings!)
Everyone's different - for example, some people are happy and at their limit with 2 buns and then there's people with lots. Some will only have indoor buns, others only outdoors, and some aren't fussed. Diversity is what makes life interesting!

Angie65
15-01-2007, 03:41 PM
That's the nice thing about bunny keeping though, everyone has different opinions. If everyone kept their bunnies in the same way then nothing would change as we'd all think we were right. By people having different opinions, people put research into things rather than taking someone's word for it (because if someone told you bunnies MUST live alone then someone told you they love company, you're going to research to find out who's right) and more is learnt :) For example, I no longer use woodshavings with any of my animals. I know lots of bunny owners still do, but through owning rats and learning about it there, I've decided it's not worth the risk (as the phenols in the shavings affect the liver - it even affects humans who work around woodshavings!)
Everyone's different - for example, some people are happy and at their limit with 2 buns and then there's people with lots. Some will only have indoor buns, others only outdoors, and some aren't fussed. Diversity is what makes life interesting!

Woodshavings are dangerous? :shock:
Oh b*gger

kitschkitty
15-01-2007, 03:48 PM
I think you have to weigh up risks to benefits though. For example, is it worth avoiding all the stress and potential injuries of bonding for a bun to have to spend 7-10+ years alone when it could really get along well with another bun (or more than one)
You could apply this to anything - should you allow your buns outside incase they contract myxi, should you ever bring anymore buns into your house incase they have something contagious, should you introduce new veg incase it causes a bad upset tummy or even bloat, should you give them a new toy incase they get their foot stuck/ingest some and damage their throat or stomach or get a blockage, etc.

Exactly, its a PERSONAL choice based on risk assessment.

Janex

A good point as we are discussing the personal choice of the person running each individual rescue.

There is no right or wrong when talking about a preference.

I suppose too it's about levels of care/need etc.

What I mean is everyone will have their own opinions on which is the better situation. A bun in a rescue (with many other buns) awaiting a home with a partner or a single house bun with human company all day.

A pair of buns in an outdoor hutch, a single bun indoors.

It's like trying to compare an apple to a banana to an orange! they all have their good & bad points, and each person will rate them differently.

kitschkitty
15-01-2007, 03:51 PM
That's the nice thing about bunny keeping though, everyone has different opinions. If everyone kept their bunnies in the same way then nothing would change as we'd all think we were right. By people having different opinions, people put research into things rather than taking someone's word for it (because if someone told you bunnies MUST live alone then someone told you they love company, you're going to research to find out who's right) and more is learnt :) For example, I no longer use woodshavings with any of my animals. I know lots of bunny owners still do, but through owning rats and learning about it there, I've decided it's not worth the risk (as the phenols in the shavings affect the liver - it even affects humans who work around woodshavings!)
Everyone's different - for example, some people are happy and at their limit with 2 buns and then there's people with lots. Some will only have indoor buns, others only outdoors, and some aren't fussed. Diversity is what makes life interesting!

Woodshavings are dangerous? :shock:
Oh b*gger

When Deej was an outdoor bunny we used shavings as I feel his hutch had very good ventilation, therefore there was a low risk of phenols building up. But as an indoor bunny I much prefer to use other products for him, not just because of phenols, but as they are cheaper, more absorbent & don't get all over the house.

Karly
15-01-2007, 04:00 PM
That's the nice thing about bunny keeping though, everyone has different opinions. If everyone kept their bunnies in the same way then nothing would change as we'd all think we were right. By people having different opinions, people put research into things rather than taking someone's word for it (because if someone told you bunnies MUST live alone then someone told you they love company, you're going to research to find out who's right) and more is learnt :) For example, I no longer use woodshavings with any of my animals. I know lots of bunny owners still do, but through owning rats and learning about it there, I've decided it's not worth the risk (as the phenols in the shavings affect the liver - it even affects humans who work around woodshavings!)
Everyone's different - for example, some people are happy and at their limit with 2 buns and then there's people with lots. Some will only have indoor buns, others only outdoors, and some aren't fussed. Diversity is what makes life interesting!

Woodshavings are dangerous? :shock:
Oh b*gger

They apparently cause changes in the liver which affect how it metabolises anaesthetic. If it does that, through fur and skin, I don't want to risk it doing anything else! Especially a concern with buns that have to have dentals often if it affects the way aneasthetic is dealt with. I use Ecopetbed which is shredded cardboard, still cheap (but sourcing a supplier is a bit more work) and no dust either

Angie65
15-01-2007, 04:25 PM
Can I use that wood cat litter stuff?

Jack's-Jane
15-01-2007, 04:35 PM
Can I use that wood cat litter stuff?

http://exoticpets.about.com/cs/reptilesgeneral/a/woodshavings.htm

Janex

Karly
15-01-2007, 04:39 PM
Can I use that wood cat litter stuff?

They're often the same stuff, just compressed. Apparently some have glue/some sort of binding material in them too. Obviously this isn't a big deal with cats who don't eat the litter but with bunnies I wouldn't risk it. That and it goes really dusty when used - I did trial it with the buns but didn't like it

Angie65
15-01-2007, 04:41 PM
Can i use shredded paper?

kayjay
15-01-2007, 04:42 PM
I've just googled ecopetbed and it looks good but really expensive unless you can order a pallet full, which obviously for 2 rabbits and 5 guinea pigs I can't. Is there any other supplier/retailer who sells in small amounts?

Karly
15-01-2007, 04:51 PM
Can i use shredded paper?

I have/do :) Seemed to littertrain my untrainable bunnies in the past :roll:


I've just googled ecopetbed and it looks good but really expensive unless you can order a pallet full, which obviously for 2 rabbits and 5 guinea pigs I can't. Is there any other supplier/retailer who sells in small amounts?

It's cheap itself, but the postage is high because of the weight of it. Cheapest online place is Game & Country I think - https://www.gameandcountry.co.uk/searchresults (type in bedding)
There's a few different makes with different names, Ecopetbed, Ecopet, BedExcel, AndyB Bedding, etc.
You can get it individually at some places - usually horse feed suppliers that stock bedding sell it or can get it in, it's around £5-6 a bale
On the rat forum quite a few people have started seeing who wants it locally, ordered a pallet and sold it on to forum members - or got them to pay in advance and used the money to order it so they don't have to worry about not selling it all.

doorkeeper
15-01-2007, 04:58 PM
I agree if you keep trying then you can find a partner..but in the case of the bun I rehomed as a single after 3 failed attempts..he actually wounded 2 of the 3 and I wasn't willing to risk another..... but my polcicy has been 99% no single buns :D

I wouldn't have tried again straight away, I would have waited until he calmed down. But that is what I would have done, not what I think you should have done. I have a lot more room here which changes the equation for deciding what to do. No two rescues are going to do exactly the same thing as they have different parameters to work with. I intend for Hopper Haven to be half sanctuary. At no point will all of our rabbits be for rehoming. We have a sizeable special needs population with people ringing us specially to take in rabbits who won't be rehomeable. So waiting for an agressive bun to calm down doesn't take away a rescue place as such, and agression is as much a special need as is dental trouble or any other problem. If they can be rehabilitated, great, if not there is probably an underlying problem that means they need the safe haven here.

BTW I use shavings. Most of the research on phenols applies to the USA where shavings are from red wood which are definitely a health hazard and should not be used. Here white wood is used which is far safer. However I use the premium grade large shavings, with no dust. Sawdust is a definite no no. In hutches I use newspaper with hay on top, but in the large pens you can' t beat shavings. Paper gets too damp in our condensation plagued big shed, and I have not yet found an alternative that doesn't seem either uncomfortable or too full of bits that threaten eye safety. Megasorb isn't available round here.

Sooz
15-01-2007, 05:06 PM
we switched from shavings to barley straw for bedding but I do use shavings in Marleys litter box and i dont think he spends enough time in it for it to cause a problem.

I mostly foster single bunnies and try to rehome them into pairs but as the owner of a single indoor house bunny myself (who has endless toys and two kittens to play with) I would never go as far as to point blank refuse to home a single rabbit provided it was to be kept as a house rabbit.

maxwell
15-01-2007, 05:14 PM
I am sorry I didn’t mean to use the term “Customer” I didn’t know another word for it in rescue terms off the top of my head :lol: . Basically what I was trying to say was, the people who come to you to take the rabbits off the rescues hands shouldn’t have to change. As Tam said, you have to make them want to change and by doing this you go by with whats the most popular. This is tricky however because it wouldn’t be nice to separate bonded rabbits if single rabbits where at demand, but I don’t feel telling people to bond these single rabbits is always a good idea as many people would just prefer single rabbits. This is what I have found, especially these days.

Karlys thoughts on opinions are correct and this is why we should not bash anyone who want single or multiple rabbits. :)

sgprescue
15-01-2007, 08:26 PM
My customers are the rabbits and guinea pigs. They come to me looking for homes and I supply what they need. Some people don't understand that I am looking for homes for animals, not supplying them with pets :wink: If people go away without a rabbit hopefully I have managed to educate them to some extent in the process which can only benefit rabbits in general.
I am not going to compromise on standards or it defeats the purpose.
I have never yet found a rabbit I couldn't find a partner for. I'm stubborn, and am prepared to wait as long as it takes. There will be no single rabbits rehomed from here.

I agree with you 100%. I wont even rehome a rabbit to live alone if it is to be a house rabbit. In the hundreds of bunnies I have rehomed I am yet to find one I cant pair up. Even the one female who wouldnt bond with any I tried her with managed to find a suitable partner in the end ;)

All rescues have their own policies and I wont argue with that, mine is that I wont rehome them as singles and I wont bend the rules for anyone ;)

Jack's-Jane
15-01-2007, 09:03 PM
I am eternally grateful to the Rescues who have rehomed single Bunnies to me or who have allowed me to longterm foster them. Otherwise Uncle Albert, Old Bill. Major Tom, Ruffles and Martha would never have had a home of their own to end their days. I did manage to bond Unky A, Old Bill and Martha, but the rehoming/Fostering was not agreed on condition that this would happen
I dont think the time Major Tom spent here was miserable for him even though he was bonded to me not another Bunny.And Ruffles was an 11 year old entire Buck when I adopted him from Bobtails. He spent 2 happy years here, although not bonded to another Rabbit. He passed away in his sleep at the age of 13. If the Rescues had insisted that these Bunnies only came here as pairs or to a GUARANTEED friend they would have ended their days in a Rescue. It is just my PERSONAL opinion that total inflexability is not always in the best interest of the Rabbit.
Not a ctitisism, just an opinion :)

Janex

Karly
15-01-2007, 09:12 PM
BTW I use shavings. Most of the research on phenols applies to the USA where shavings are from red wood which are definitely a health hazard and should not be used. Here white wood is used which is far safer. However I use the premium grade large shavings, with no dust. Sawdust is a definite no no. In hutches I use newspaper with hay on top, but in the large pens you can' t beat shavings. Paper gets too damp in our condensation plagued big shed, and I have not yet found an alternative that doesn't seem either uncomfortable or too full of bits that threaten eye safety. Megasorb isn't available round here.

Actually I'm pretty sure it applies to pine which is what the majority of UK shavings are, which is at the same 'level' as cedar which is what is used a lot in the USA. Aspen is one of the safe ones, as is spruce I think.
Either way, I find them dusty (even "dust extracted" -this obviously refers to the removal of dust at the point of bagging but as the shavings rub together they break down into a fine powder which really hurts if you suddenly tip it out or open the bag too quickly and it flies into your face!) and quite strongly scented, which must be even stronger to small animals who have a more sensitive sense of smell and are inches away from it 24/7

bunny_burrows
15-01-2007, 09:13 PM
Rabbits are individuals, just like people. Some will prefer living with a friend or in a bonded group, some will prefer living on their own being spoilt by their humans. I don't think it's fair for people to lump them together and say rabbits can ONLY be happy in pairs/groups because personally I don't think that's true. JMO.

Karly
15-01-2007, 09:22 PM
Rabbits are individuals, just like people. Some will prefer living with a friend or in a bonded group, some will prefer living on their own being spoilt by their humans. I don't think it's fair for people to lump them together and say rabbits can ONLY be happy in pairs/groups because personally I don't think that's true. JMO.

But what people are saying is that they'd only rehome a single rabbit if it definately wouldn't get along. The fact that most, if not all of their rabbits have been bonded with effort put in shows that it's a good idea to rehome in pairs. Even if a long bonding took 6 months or something, that's only 5% of a 10 year old bunnies life. 95% of a sociable species' life spent with company isn't a bad statistic to me

Jack's-Jane
15-01-2007, 09:47 PM
Rabbits are individuals, just like people. Some will prefer living with a friend or in a bonded group, some will prefer living on their own being spoilt by their humans. I don't think it's fair for people to lump them together and say rabbits can ONLY be happy in pairs/groups because personally I don't think that's true. JMO.

I agree :D

Janex

buttons&thumper
15-01-2007, 10:00 PM
I agree buns should be rehomed in pairs, however my local Blue Cross wouldn't rehome me a single to bond with a single I had at home.... very odd!!! "Sorry we only rehome in pairs from the ones we have here, you have 2 or none!" I walked away puzzled and shocked! x jess

Apache
15-01-2007, 10:27 PM
Hmmm.. Well I've tried Alfred with 6 different females, 2 of them made it home with him. The first had a spat after a week, and literally scalped an 1 inchcircle of his head.

So I tried again, and 4 bunnies later, his second wife came home, he unfortunately became ill 5 days after she arrived, and was unwell for 3 weeks, when he started to make a recovery, he turned on her. I tried them in a neutral area etc to rebond them several times, but at this point she was covered in bites, so I gave up.

Alfred then became a single house rabbit, and is very happy!

Although I do work from home, and he does get lots of attention.

Jx

Amethyst
15-01-2007, 10:29 PM
Alfred then became a single house rabbit, and is very happy!

And my, isn't he a stunner?! :love: :love: :love: :love:

AMETHYST

sgprescue
15-01-2007, 10:53 PM
I agree buns should be rehomed in pairs, however my local Blue Cross wouldn't rehome me a single to bond with a single I had at home.... very odd!!! "Sorry we only rehome in pairs from the ones we have here, you have 2 or none!" I walked away puzzled and shocked! x jess

Perhaps they only had pairs in at the time. Most of the bunnies I rehome are singles to be paired up with another one, although I wouldnt split up a bonded pair for the sake of finding one bunny a home ;)

Jaypot
15-01-2007, 10:58 PM
I have to point out that some buns can't have partners due to severe disabilities etc - the majority of buns that we take do eventually get a partner but some cannot as it is not beneficial to them or to house another bun with a severely disabled bun.
Scoot did not have a partner but was a very, very happy boy :D He lived his life surrounded by buns but not with them if you know what I mean.
Oxo could not have a partner - his disabilities mean that he cannot be neutered and it wouldn't be fair on him either. Rufus is the same, he is severly disabled but does not see himself as a bun anyway :lol: :lol: :lol: Cinders tries to kill any bun or cat that comes in his way :lol: :lol:
So, you have to think of the severely handicapped, they can have a very fullfilled life without a partner but with lots of love, companionship with their carers and of course, seeing and smelling other buns :D

luvabun
16-01-2007, 06:38 AM
I'm eternally grateful that a Rescue where I found the adorable old Molly (and for the benefit of newbies, she was 11 years old and had spent the past 6 years in Rescues :cry: ) were willing to rehome her as a single and without a rigid homecheck. I live alone, work full time and she was kept in a hutch outside so I know a lot of Rescues would not have let me have her. Yet anyone who followed the 18 months she had with me can't say that she had poor quality of life... I'm sure a lot of the old timers on here immediately have a vision of Molls sitting on my knee whilst I'm tapping away at the PC at the mention of her name. Yes we attempted bonding but it wasn't to be - who knows, maybe Molly knew her tumours were too far gone :cry:

Jack's-Jane
16-01-2007, 06:54 AM
I have to point out that some buns can't have partners due to severe disabilities etc - the majority of buns that we take do eventually get a partner but some cannot as it is not beneficial to them or to house another bun with a severely disabled bun.
Scoot did not have a partner but was a very, very happy boy :D He lived his life surrounded by buns but not with them if you know what I mean.
Oxo could not have a partner - his disabilities mean that he cannot be neutered and it wouldn't be fair on him either. Rufus is the same, he is severly disabled but does not see himself as a bun anyway :lol: :lol: :lol: Cinders tries to kill any bun or cat that comes in his way :lol: :lol:
So, you have to think of the severely handicapped, they can have a very fullfilled life without a partner but with lots of love, companionship with their carers and of course, seeing and smelling other buns :D

Jay you have put across the point I was TRYING to make far more eloquently than me... :oops: There really are SOME circumstances when it would be unfare to attempt to bond a particular Bunny

As for Cinders...... :shock: :shock:

Janex

Karly
17-01-2007, 10:27 PM
I have to point out that some buns can't have partners due to severe disabilities etc - the majority of buns that we take do eventually get a partner but some cannot as it is not beneficial to them or to house another bun with a severely disabled bun.
Scoot did not have a partner but was a very, very happy boy :D He lived his life surrounded by buns but not with them if you know what I mean.
Oxo could not have a partner - his disabilities mean that he cannot be neutered and it wouldn't be fair on him either. Rufus is the same, he is severly disabled but does not see himself as a bun anyway :lol: :lol: :lol: Cinders tries to kill any bun or cat that comes in his way :lol: :lol:
So, you have to think of the severely handicapped, they can have a very fullfilled life without a partner but with lots of love, companionship with their carers and of course, seeing and smelling other buns :D

Jay you have put across the point I was TRYING to make far more eloquently than me... :oops: There really are SOME circumstances when it would be unfare to attempt to bond a particular Bunny

As for Cinders...... :shock: :shock:

Janex

But the point everyone on the other side was trying to make is that all the bunnies they've tried can be bonded. If rescues start rehoming single bunnies as a routine thing then they could be rehoming lots of bunnies who may bond very easily.
I've never said that every rabbit will bond but if rescues start saying it's not something that needs to be attempted at least a few times then they're basically accepting that any bunny is fine as a lone bunny.
It's common sense in situations like Jay's that there will be buns that can't be bonded for various reasons but as rescues do a lot to teach people how to care for bunnies I think they need to promote bonding.

lucyj
17-01-2007, 11:35 PM
I only have 1 thing to say - fudge, and dulux, its love love love for me!! I wish I could!! Please god let me win the lottery so I can have a huge house - no a farm, with a barn and loads of gardens!

Jack's-Jane
18-01-2007, 06:44 AM
Basically we agree on 'Never say NEVER' then :)

Janex

Karly
18-01-2007, 11:24 AM
Basically we agree on 'Never say NEVER' then :)

Janex

Yup, I just think it's something that should be done on a case by case basis rather than advertising that they sometimes rehome singles. As shown on this thread, most buns can be bonded. I mean, when I came here I kept reading that two males can very very rarely be bonded, and I ended up with a trio of boys!

Azraelm
18-01-2007, 11:40 AM
Basically we agree on 'Never say NEVER' then :)

Janex

Yup, I just think it's something that should be done on a case by case basis rather than advertising that they sometimes rehome singles. As shown on this thread, most buns can be bonded. I mean, when I came here I kept reading that two males can very very rarely be bonded, and I ended up with a trio of boys!

Well i think thats the key really isnt it- single bunns should be the exception rather than the norm IMO.

ShivyRex
18-01-2007, 12:23 PM
A question for the rescues on here:

How many buns have you rehomed as a single bun in that last year - i.e. during 2006 - who have remained so?

I supposed results will suggest whether, for those rescues at least, rehoming single buns is the norm or not and that all efforts were made to try and rehome them in pairs/groups were made.

Of course some places do rehome singly. Zion was rehomed to me as a single bun but i expressed strongly that he would be getting a neutered friend in the near future, which he has. I understand though that everyone could assure such things and not do so.

Interesting debate :D

norrielian
18-01-2007, 01:16 PM
Very interesting debate.

I think if a rabbit can and is willing to be bonded, then its better to have them with their own kind, but like others have said, some want to and are happy living alone.

I do find it odd that some rescues only rehome in pairs though. I know when I was looking for a partner for Dillon our local rescue centre was full of paired bunnies but would not let me have a single bunny to bond with him!? I think they will rehome less bunnies this way because people are becoming more educated about rabbits and may have bought a single rabbit in the first instance but later look for partners.

Tamsin
18-01-2007, 01:22 PM
I think a rescue that won't pair up a single bun with another single bun is quite rare. There can sometimes be a shortage of single rabbits though as pairing bunnies up in the rescue means they can house twice as many.

Tam

norrielian
18-01-2007, 01:39 PM
I think a rescue that won't pair up a single bun with another single bun is quite rare. There can sometimes be a shortage of single rabbits though as pairing bunnies up in the rescue means they can house twice as many.

Tam

Yes, understand you can house more that way. Their policy is to bond two rabbits before they are available for rehoming so there wasn't even the opportunity to rehome a single rabbit.

maxwell
18-01-2007, 04:01 PM
Kind of reminds me what was said in this thread

http://forums.rabbitrehome.org.uk/viewtopic.php?t=32376

I do think bunnyangel (or whatever his/her name was) did talk some sense about this (although they could have put it in better context :shock: ). There isn’t anything abnormal about rabbits being single – if anything I would say that was probably a shallow comment imo. I think all rabbits should be allowed the freedom too decide what they want and how they would like to live their lives, rather then us trying to bombard them with other rabbits. I mean the truth is you have to go by what people want. Would you ladies like it if Asda took chocolates off the shelf and forced you to eat salad because it’s good for you? :lol: You would go somewhere else wouldn't you. Ok bad example but you get my point. :lol:

Remember only rehoming ONE rabbit is still one rabbit less….it makes a difference. Although I don’t think it’s fair to split a couple up. I really do think rescues should have more options to rehome single rabbits and not try and pair them all up as norrielian said. I mean this would lead to favorites wouldn't it? You like one rabbit but it’s paired up so you have the other rabbit simply because its with the rabbit you like best. Isn't it just better to have that one rabbit you fell in love with if its single anyway?

Tamsin
18-01-2007, 04:23 PM
If you ask bunnies, they will go to the same level of effort to obtain social contact as as the will for food (Seaman, 2002).

There is a reasonably amount of scientific study devoted to rabbits welfare. A lot of the sugestions/rules aren't just based on what people 'feel' is right for bunnies but has a based on behaviour stidies.

Spacegirl
18-01-2007, 05:08 PM
Remember only rehoming ONE rabbit is still one rabbit less….it makes a difference.. . . I really do think rescues should have more options to rehome single rabbits and not try and pair them all up as norrielian said. I mean this would lead to favorites wouldn't it? You like one rabbit but it’s paired up so you have the other rabbit simply because its with the rabbit you like best.

I don't think that rescues would necessarily sere it as "one bunny less" and therefore making a difference since their aim isn't to get the buns rehomed as quickly as possible but to get them rehomed to the best situation possible.

And some rescues will be flexible about paired up rabbits. If someone came along and wanted two rabbits from separate pairs then they may be able to re-pair them. Or one of a pair may be chosen to be bonded with an existing rabbit and the remaining one re-paired with another.
I think you have to start with these rules, but of course have some flexibility to best meet the needs of the rabbits.

Azraelm
18-01-2007, 05:15 PM
I really do think rescues should have more options to rehome single rabbits and not try and pair them all up as norrielian said. I mean this would lead to favorites wouldn't it? You like one rabbit but it’s paired up so you have the other rabbit simply because its with the rabbit you like best. Isn't it just better to have that one rabbit you fell in love with if its single anyway?

Not everyone loves one of a pair more than the other :wink:
I had a single bunn and then got her a friend and I loved him just as much.

Angie65
18-01-2007, 05:58 PM
I really do think rescues should have more options to rehome single rabbits and not try and pair them all up as norrielian said. I mean this would lead to favorites wouldn't it? You like one rabbit but it’s paired up so you have the other rabbit simply because its with the rabbit you like best. Isn't it just better to have that one rabbit you fell in love with if its single anyway?

Not everyone loves one of a pair more than the other :wink:
I had a single bunn and then got her a friend and I loved him just as much.

I have a different favourite every week :oops: :lol:

Jack's-Jane
18-01-2007, 06:04 PM
Goodness, I could never EVER break up a bonded pair just to accomodate some-one who had 'fallen in love' with one of them and wanted to bond them with a Bun they already have :shock: Even if the remaining Bunny went on to be bonded with another Bun

Unless I have mis-understood what is being suggested as an option.... :?

Janex

Spacegirl
18-01-2007, 06:26 PM
Goodness, I could never EVER break up a bonded pair just to accomodate some-one who had 'fallen in love' with one of them and wanted to bond them with a Bun they already have :shock: Even if the remaining Bunny went on to be bonded with another Bun

Unless I have mis-understood what is being suggested as an option.... :?

Janex
You haven't misunderstood. I have come across some rescues that do this. I don't think its SO terrible if all the buns end up in happy homes with pertners. \
I DO find it hard to understand though that people go to rescues and request this. One lady who ran a rescue told me that quite often if the two buns are too "samey" like a pair of black or agoutis then people will often want one of them paired up with another bun that is "different" and I do find this very sad. I would never want to split a pair when I am choosing who to adopt. Come to that, I would never pick a rabbit on looks anyway.

Jacqui_UK
18-01-2007, 06:50 PM
Well Buster was a single bunny and was happ living with the other pets. Hunni and Missi live together but Hunni always bullies Missi I do not know what to do with them. Do I leave them together or split them. Ebunny is a house bunny and uses Kitti as his best friend which I think is sweet - so I see both sides of the story. I personnaly feel single bunnies are happier as long as they are loved lots or pairs ar bettere only if they are equal and happy.

beckiboo186
18-01-2007, 07:41 PM
Rabbits are individuals, just like people. Some will prefer living with a friend or in a bonded group, some will prefer living on their own being spoilt by their humans. I don't think it's fair for people to lump them together and say rabbits can ONLY be happy in pairs/groups because personally I don't think that's true. JMO.

Totally Agree Jess :D I know Tilly is a very happy bunny, and won't be considering a friend for her. Tbh I have stopped listening to the 'Your cruel for keeping a single bun' type thing .. as I think I know my bun better than they do!! :roll: X

becks
01-02-2007, 01:20 PM
sam currently is a single bun,a nd she gets lots of attention,a nd is spoilt rotton.

however she is gettinga friend next week :-) this isnt because she is pining however, it's because she has a new big outdoor hosue (we had kept her indoors over winter, as we got her november, and she was use to teh warmth insid ethe petstore) which she will be moving into.

and i firmly believe outdoor bunnies shoudl have teh oppertunity of afriend.

honeybunny
01-02-2007, 01:44 PM
Goodness, I could never EVER break up a bonded pair just to accomodate some-one who had 'fallen in love' with one of them and wanted to bond them with a Bun they already have :shock: Even if the remaining Bunny went on to be bonded with another Bun

Unless I have mis-understood what is being suggested as an option.... :?

Janex

my local RSPCa will let anyone choose a single bun from a pair :( i know , like all rescues, they have sooo many rabbits..but i could not do that if the pair were bonded

chloaster
01-02-2007, 01:53 PM
I really struggle with seeing buns on their own :( I do believe they are sociable animals - Everytime I see Frazer and Simba, my fosters, I'm tempted to pop them in together but I think Jill might have something to say about that one!! :lol: I know single buns are easier to home as many people are looking for partners for their already established rabbit but I don't think it's right to break up closely bonded rabbits but rabbits that are bonded and don't have a close relationship may possibly find another partner more suited to them?

janice
01-02-2007, 01:57 PM
A question for the rescues on here:

How many buns have you rehomed as a single bun in that last year - i.e. during 2006 - who have remained so?
Interesting debate :D

None as single buns who were to stay as single buns. We rehomed buns which were technically 'single', however these had partners whom they were to live with, either owners were experienced with pairing up or we paired them up to a pre existing bun.

We do not split up a pair unless it is apparent that they are not totally happy together. They would be split and immediatly repaired up.

janice
01-02-2007, 02:00 PM
I think a rescue that won't pair up a single bun with another single bun is quite rare. There can sometimes be a shortage of single rabbits though as pairing bunnies up in the rescue means they can house twice as many.

Tam

Yes, understand you can house more that way. Their policy is to bond two rabbits before they are available for rehoming so there wasn't even the opportunity to rehome a single rabbit.

Many of the rescues near me do not pair up buns unless their prosepctive new owner has chosen two to live together. I rarely have paired up buns staying with me :cry:

Snowy
01-02-2007, 03:21 PM
Goodness, I could never EVER break up a bonded pair just to accomodate some-one who had 'fallen in love' with one of them and wanted to bond them with a Bun they already have :shock: Even if the remaining Bunny went on to be bonded with another Bun

Unless I have mis-understood what is being suggested as an option.... :?

Janex

my local RSPCa will let anyone choose a single bun from a pair :( i know , like all rescues, they have sooo many rabbits..but i could not do that if the pair were bonded

Totally agree with both of you............We would NEVER split a hapily bonded pair so as one could go with another bunny and I would go so far as to say that if a member of public insisted on this then we would deem that home as unsuitable.