PDA

View Full Version : Yorkies and rabbits? - UPDATE: CHANGE OF PLAN!



Amethyst
08-05-2006, 08:32 AM
Hi everyone,

This at first may seem obvious, but is it possible or advisable to keep a Yorkshire Terrier if you have rabbits?

I know they were bred to chase and kill rats, but I'd have thought a rabbit would have been too big for it to tackle as prey. Am I wrong? Bearing in mind my rabbits would probably be bigger than the terrier!

Is this possible? Could it work? Many thanks,

AMETHYST

Kay
08-05-2006, 08:58 AM
Hiya yeah it is possible for them to kill bunnies. It doesn't even have to be from a bite but the stress of being chased can be enough.

Terriers bite the rabbits neck either breaking it or causing enough damage for a long painful death.

It is a deep instinct too and one I think would be very hard to get rid of. If you have no choice then I would suggest keeping them totally separate. Also don't give your dog any squeaky toys, the squeak is roughly the same noise a destressed rabbit makes when frightened :cry:

Jack's-Jane
08-05-2006, 09:09 AM
Personally I would not keep ANY type of terrier whilst I have rabbits.
Their instinct is to chase. Even if they dont mean to kill, sadly that is often what happens :cry: :cry:
Janex

Amethyst
08-05-2006, 09:11 AM
That's what I figured! Just wanted to check I wasn't making assumptions.

Thanks guys.

AMETHYST

bizzy_vicki
08-05-2006, 04:57 PM
a dog is what you make it!
if you had a yt puppy and it knew to not chase and bother the bun it should be fine. my pal has 2 rescue yt's and a rabbit. the male dog is scared of the chasing bun and her rabbit bud is firm friends with her female dog, so much so he humps her and sleeps in the same bed! :lol:
not all terriers chase and kill 8)

sgprescue
08-05-2006, 05:12 PM
a dog is what you make it!
if you had a yt puppy and it knew to not chase and bother the bun it should be fine. my pal has 2 rescue yt's and a rabbit. the male dog is scared of the chasing bun and her rabbit bud is firm friends with her female dog, so much so he humps her and sleeps in the same bed! :lol:
not all terriers chase and kill 8)
I have to agree with you there. I have 4 terriers here (a westie, 2 JRT and a yorkie) and I am sure you all know the number of rabbits and pigs I have here. The dogs are all really good with them. I wouldnt trust our westie to be left with them but the others are all really well behaved. Our miniature Yorkie Tia is by far the best natured with them. She will even wash a hamster if given the chance :lol: Our westie and one of the JRT's were Irish pound dogs and at first were very hiperactive around the animals but given time and the right training they have learnt to accept and respect them :thumb:

sola
08-05-2006, 05:30 PM
My nan's first yorkie was very unterrier like, he wasn't bothered in the least by anything, hamster or rabbit.
In his later years, we looked after him for a bit and we had a free roaming bunny. Tramp (the dog) was a bit blind then. but didn't really bother with the bun except after almost bumping into him and thinking what's that? The rabbit didn't know what to make of him either and I'm sure he would've been fine with my rats too.

My nan's current yorkie is a true terrier, she's obsesive with my rats and the cat and I don't trust her with either :shock: but she ignores the rabbits completly. She was interested at first, staring at them through their run, but once they came up to say hi and ignored her, she wasn't bothered, even when they escaped the run when I didn't realse and let her out. She sort of ran at them, realised they were the rabbits and ignored them completely. She chases the wild ones given half a chance though.

Amethyst
09-05-2006, 08:53 AM
Ok, I'm now thinking perhaps about a Papillon. A toy breed so not naturally aggressive to rabbits, and I when with the rabbits they will ALWAYS be supervised.

http://www.papillonclub.org/

http://images.google.co.uk/images?svnum=10&hl=en&lr=&safe=off&q=papillon+dog&btnG=Search

What do you think?

AMETHYST

elve
09-05-2006, 09:00 AM
you might find a cavalier king charles spaniel easier to come by in rescue than a papillon - bear in mind too that these are all very 'yappy' dogs, and the noise can frighten bunnies (and drive you crazy :lol: )

I think loppyju has a king charles or cavalier king charles spaniel - looks totally soppy, and you could also look around rescues for a small cross breed with spaniel type rather than terrier type maybe?

But papillons are cute :D If you can find one - I wouldn't go to a breeder after that awful thread on dalmatian puppies the other week, but it's up to you.

Amethyst
09-05-2006, 09:03 AM
Oh no, I'd prefer not to go to a breeder purely because there are so many rescue dogs. Thanks for the advice on the Cavalier King Charles, the only thing is my mate used to have one and he was totally bonkers! A bit too looney for the bunnies I think, a Papillon seemed more sedate from the info I've read.

Obviously I have a LOT more research to do, so any more advice would really be appreciated!

AMETHYST

elve
09-05-2006, 09:10 AM
I think with your friends spaniel it was probably, like most popular breeds, badly bred - it's a shame but some unscrupulous people churn out the most popular breeds, and there are some really bad dogs around as a result - My mum did this with her golden retreiver, as she has £ signs always in her eyes - one of the pups had to be PTS for aggression! You would never normally think of goldies as an aggressive breed, but puppy farming produces all sorts of neurotic dogs sadly :(

I think your best bet is to look around rescues and small ads especially - loppyju (again!) got a gorgeous doberman pup recently from small ads - people get them and then find they can't handle the responsibility, so pass them on. It's worth taking your time to find the right dog, as they are such a major part of your family, and hopefully will live for nearly 20yrs with you - good luck!

Truffybuns
09-05-2006, 09:13 AM
I have both a house rabbit and a springer spaniel and they get on fine. We had Oren from a pup and she is rather a shy girl so lets the bunny run rings around her :lol: An article in a dog magazine I read reccomended spaniel type dogs as being good with cat's etc as they do not have such a high chase instinct, have you thought of cocker spaniels? They are soooo cute and apparently not as nutty as the springer! (what I originaly wanted but O/H got confused and we ended up seeing a litter of springer puppies instead :roll: ) Good luck with whatever you decide :D

Amethyst
09-05-2006, 09:13 AM
Thank you!! I've wanted a dog for most of my life but when I got rabbits I thought I'd never be able to have one. Plus at the moment I don't have the time or space needed for a larger breed, so it'd have to be a very wee doggie!! Of course I have time to walk it every day and groom it, and I have enough money for insurance and vaccines/worming.

I'm definitely going to take my time, and make sure I know exactly what I'm doing before I make the final decision!

AMETHYST

elve
09-05-2006, 09:19 AM
funny you should say that, but I find keeping rabbits quite similar to dogs, but without the bad bits of barking and smelly poo - Maa reminds me so much of a spaniel puppy - she loves her 'walkies' and can't get enough stroking and fuss, comes when called (well OK she's deaf and half blind - I have to wave at her!) - she's been a real suprise to me and is different to the other rabbits, who are more 'rabbity' :)

Spacegirl
09-05-2006, 09:43 AM
Why don't you just speak to a rescue centre.Dogs are , after all, more individual than their breed and a decent rescue should be able to identify a dog they have with a suitable temperament. Also, I wouldn't go just by size. A lot of larger breeds are extremely docile and in my eperience smaller breeds are often more snappy and territorial. Also remember that mongrels can be alot less prone to health problems than some pure breeds.

Amethyst
09-05-2006, 01:31 PM
Why don't you just speak to a rescue centre.Dogs are , after all, more individual than their breed and a decent rescue should be able to identify a dog they have with a suitable temperament. Also, I wouldn't go just by size. A lot of larger breeds are extremely docile and in my eperience smaller breeds are often more snappy and territorial. Also remember that mongrels can be alot less prone to health problems than some pure breeds.

Yes, I'm speaking to a few rescue centres. It's not just the rabbits that are influencing my choice of small breed, it's the fact that we don't have enough space at the moment for any breed larger than a toy.

I'm not actually bothered about a breeds' appearance, more the temperament. It's hard to ask a question about the suitability of a particular dog when you don't specify a breed! :) I'm just trying to get an idea of which dog's general temperament would be a good thing to look for.

AMETHYST

Inimical Me
09-05-2006, 01:41 PM
I really do think it's all down to the individual dog. My sister has a Staffie cross (there are thousands of them in rescues too, they seem like the number one unwanted dog), and not only is she absolutely gorgeous, she is the soppiest and most friendly dog I have ever met. She will jump on anyone who comes in the room :lol: but when it comes to the rabbits, she wags her tail, sniffs them a bit and ignores them :lol: .

We used to have a Jack Russel, he was the tiniest thing and dead soppy with people, but hated any other animals :shock: .

At the end of the day, a dog is an individual personality like anything else I suppose.

nicolar
09-05-2006, 03:08 PM
You could try the Kennel Club Breed rescues if you are looking for a particular breed. We are always very careful if we home a dog to a house with small furries in - tend not to rehome terriers into those sort of homes or sight hounds. There are lotsa lovely cross breeds out there too, so don't forget those!!! :D

Amethyst
09-05-2006, 03:55 PM
You could try the Kennel Club Breed rescues if you are looking for a particular breed.

Do you have a link? I can't seem to find the relevant bit on their website.

AMETHYST

KathyM
09-05-2006, 05:30 PM
Naaa what you want is a Dharma. She's too fat and lazy to bother with rabbits. :lol:

<forget the bit about her being huuuuuuge though>

touie
09-05-2006, 05:54 PM
what about a shitzu? they're small and the ones i have known have been quite docile and good with other animals?

nicolar
09-05-2006, 07:09 PM
Hiya

couldn't find it on their website but give them a ring: 0870 606 6750.

Or if you like when I go back to work on Saturday I can look through the breed rescue directory + find some papillon rescues for you? or any other breed you are interested in?

Nicola

Amethyst
10-05-2006, 07:16 AM
Hiya

couldn't find it on their website but give them a ring: 0870 606 6750.

Or if you like when I go back to work on Saturday I can look through the breed rescue directory + find some papillon rescues for you? or any other breed you are interested in?

Nicola

Thanks!! Yes that'd be great if you could find some papillon rescues. :) I'm also interested in shitzus - thanks for the reminder touie! In the meantime I'll call the number you gave me. Thank you! :D

AMETHYST

nicolar
10-05-2006, 07:39 AM
That's OK, I've got a few days off so won't be back in work til Sat but I'll find some numbers then!

Towsbuns
10-05-2006, 08:12 AM
Dog pages has links to various breed rescues.
http://www.dogpages.org.uk/breeds.htm.
There are also lots of dogs listed looking for new homes - you can also put something into the homes offered section - good luck.

Amethyst
10-05-2006, 07:08 PM
Ok I just got this reply from a Papillon breeder (I wanted more information on the breed - wasn't looking to actually buy from them). I'm surprised by this. I will work full-time but will walk the dog every day and spend around 8 hours a day with it (from the minute I get home to the minute I go to bed). Plus are they really THAT hard to house-train?

"Papillons, in particular, have been bred to be companion dogs and crave HUMAN company. There is also the fact that, as with most toy dogs, they are usually very difficult to house train, and if you are not there during the day it would be impossible. This would mean that if they have the run of the house (which is not a good idea anyway), you would come home to a lot of pees and poops all over the home."

AMETHYST

bizzy_vicki
10-05-2006, 07:20 PM
toy dogs are no harder to house train than any other breed of dog. :roll:

Amethyst
10-05-2006, 07:22 PM
toy dogs are no harder to house train than any other breed of dog. :roll:

These guys are supposed to be breeders! :? Do you think they just didn't want to home to a working household and were trying to put me off? I even said I'd have two dogs if loneliness would be an issue, but they just emphasised that they needed "HUMAN companionship"...

AMETHYST

sola
10-05-2006, 09:49 PM
Well I have a lhasa apso and bichon cross and they crave human companionship, um usually. Well they follow us around.

Some dogs are harder to house train than others and I think it'll be quite difficult to house train a puppy because you won't be there. (not impossible as I know of people with full time jobs and dogs and they walk them on their lunch breaks so the dogs arn't on their own for longer than 4 hours a day without people.)

Maybe an adult would be better? Already housetrained, usually if you don't include my two :roll:

Lhasa apsos are good with small furries. :D We got ours at 7 years old and she's not bothered with rabbits, rats or cats, or infact any animal lol
Even though our Bichon cross was very interested in the animals he was fine when properly introduced and although he doesn't like the rats much, he won't go out of his way to get them (he followed Scruff around the floor eariler and tried nipping his fur lol) wouldn't leave them unsupervised though. And he's fine with our rabbits, he loves nipping Nutmeg's fur on her head and she likes him doing it because she think he's grooming her :lol:

Ok I'm rambling now

Amethyst
11-05-2006, 07:07 AM
Well I have a lhasa apso and bichon cross and they crave human companionship, um usually. Well they follow us around.

Some dogs are harder to house train than others and I think it'll be quite difficult to house train a puppy because you won't be there.

I've been looking at loads of info and yes I agree, I think a young adult would be better for me rather than a puppy. Not just the toilet training but the worming, the vaccines, the special diet etc. would drive up the initial cost and I wouldn't get that with a slightly older dog. I'm not sure I could give the time needed to socialise and train a new puppy, whereas with a slightly older dog I could just build on what was already there.

Thanks for the advice!

AMETHYST

sola
11-05-2006, 12:31 PM
You're welcome :)
I actually don't beleive I'll ever get a puppy, because I don't feel I'll have the time to house train it. I'd get an adult or an oldie :love: if I had the space and money for another dog

Amethyst
11-05-2006, 01:24 PM
I'm trying to make a list of the things I'll need for a new dog, so if I've missed anything out, please let me know.

harness
dog coat
collar
leash
ID tag
microchipping
booster vaccines (if applicable)
neutering (if applicable)
worming (regularly)
dog bed
dog food (any recommendations?)
toys
food and water bowls
car harness
crate
brush
treats
pooper scooper
nail trimmers
kwik stop (stops bleeding if the quick it cut accidentally)
insurance

AMETHYST

nicolar
11-05-2006, 04:13 PM
Dog food wise, Burns is very good as is Hill's Science Plan. We feed Hill's to the dogs at work + they do very well on it. I'd go for a complete food, much better for dog and easier to dish up too, no messing around with any meat!!

merita_hm
14-10-2018, 07:31 PM
Hiya yeah it is possible for them to kill bunnies. It doesn't even have to be from a bite but the stress of being chased can be enough.

Terriers bite the rabbits neck either breaking it or causing enough damage for a long painful death.

It is a deep instinct too and one I think would be very hard to get rid of. If you have no choice then I would suggest keeping them totally separate. Also don't give your dog any squeaky toys, the squeak is roughly the same noise a destressed rabbit makes when frightened :cry:

yes that may be true but my yorkshire terrier doesnt hunt any animals, in fact he loves new pets, he doesnt bite at all, because we taught him that its bad so the only thing that he does is he'll lick the rabbit, and my dog doesnt play with toys so would i still be able to have them together or am i still going to have to separate them.

Zoobec
14-10-2018, 07:45 PM
yes that may be true but my yorkshire terrier doesnt hunt any animals, in fact he loves new pets, he doesnt bite at all, because we taught him that its bad so the only thing that he does is he'll lick the rabbit, and my dog doesnt play with toys so would i still be able to have them together or am i still going to have to separate them.

This is a thread from 2006, you would be better to start a new thread of your own :thumb: personally I wouldnít leave a dog unattended with a rabbit

Jack's-Jane
15-10-2018, 05:04 AM
This is a thread from 2006, you would be better to start a new thread of your own :thumb: personally I wouldn’t leave a dog unattended with a rabbit

100% this. A dog should never, ever be left unsupervised with Rabbits (or any other small fury). Regardless of the breed of dog x