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toffee
25-03-2006, 04:11 PM
Hello.

I am thinking of adopting a rabbit to be a boyfriend for Lolly in the next few months. I am a bit worried about the prospect of a home check though as I live in quite a poor area of town and have a small garden - there are lots of cats around so i can't put Lola out in the garden in the run for very long as i cant leave her unsupervised.

She does have full run of the house though and seems to be happy - she has her own bedroom and often comes downstairs to sit with us or lie in front of the fire.

Do you think there would be a problem?

kim 106
25-03-2006, 05:15 PM
i only have a small garden cats around but was alowed to adopted a bun from rescue i think aa they want is to make sure you can look after the bun feed it pay for vets bills ect may be do the home cheeck first then look for a bun this is what i did

Becca
25-03-2006, 05:49 PM
I am sure a home check will go fine Toffee,regardless of where you live and what garden space you have.
I was dreading my home check as i have two cats and a St Bernard dog who is huge.
Everything went fine though :D

Good luck

Becca

janice
25-03-2006, 06:04 PM
I am a bit worried about the prospect of a home check though as I live in quite a poor area of town and have a small garden - there are lots of cats around so i can't put Lola out in the garden in the run for very long as i cant leave her unsupervised.

She does have full run of the house though and seems to be happy - she has her own bedroom and often comes downstairs to sit with us or lie in front of the fire.

Do you think there would be a problem?

I don't think there will be a problem, adopting rabbits is not just an option for people in the more affluent areas of town only, flat dwellers and mobile home owners are also offer excellent homes. A home visit is to check that any rabbit(s) adopted have adequate free and confined space and will be kept in a safe enviroment where they will come to no harm. It is also looking at the owners attitude to caring for a rabbit including ability and intention to seek medical advice where necessary. If you are worried about not being able to give an aspect of care, such as adequate outside free time, mention this to the person, but do add that you are able to compensate this by providing lots of indoor space for them. It is also an opportunity to assess someones knowledge base about feeding, vaccination and general rabbit care and to give advice, suggestions and information if any of these are lacking to allow the person to make alterations so that they can offer a reasonable standard of care to their rabbits.

Janice

tmak
25-03-2006, 06:16 PM
No I don't think there'll be a problem, you shouldn't think of it as if you are being judged - think of it as a check to match the pet to the situation, they'll take all the factors into account when assessing you - if you have a small garden a pet that's used to big fields would be unsuitable, but a docile little house pet would be perfect!

Also they have to take into account how much time you can spend with it, as there'll be no point in giving you a clingy pet that needs lots of attention if you're in work all day and down the gym 5 days a week, but a more independent animal would settle in fine. The welfare of the pet and the suitability of the owner to look after it and not neglect it are the top priorities as some of these pets have been rescued from truly awful conditions, and so they must be rehomed in a good environment to avoid this scenario happening to them again.

Also don't put yourself down, a loving home is all that really matters, do you honestly think that rich people in posh areas make better pet owners? They don't necessarily.

The fact that already taking good care of Lolly will go a long way, I think all these formalities put off people that arent really serious, which is a good thing, but you'll be fine!

elve
25-03-2006, 07:33 PM
I think you should discuss it with the rescue on the phone first, just so you don't get stressed - If you find a rescue that doesn't agree with a small garden then ring another one and tell them about your circumstances too - I'm sure you'll find a rescue person who is happy with your setup, so don't let it put you off - and if you've already cleared it with them over the phone, and put them in the picture, you won't feel so nervous about them coming to have a look :)

bunnymadhouse
26-03-2006, 04:55 PM
dont worry too much . Although i do think buns need some time outside if poss i think it is far more important that they have lots of space and time for excersise and a caring owner who will take good care of all their needs .
Angie
BARC

doorkeeper
26-03-2006, 06:30 PM
It doesn't sound to me as if you would have a problem. Having a whole room to live in and free range when you are home sounds great to me :D Just make sure the rescue you use doesn't feel uncomfortable about house rabbits, a few don't like it. My feeling is that while rabbits do love being outside(I think in general they are happier out than in) that the main thing is that they have enough room to move freely, and if this is available inside rather than outside it is better than not having the space. Of course the rabbits temperament contributes too, some are too nervous for indoors- or too destructive :roll: