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AmberUK
26-10-2004, 10:05 PM
Ok you can see I am going to be lazy ;-) who uses packet salards for their bunnies and which ones? I tried to read the list of ingredients andgave uy. I know rocket has given me problems in the past and quite a few had rocket but anyone use any lazy packets?

Bob
26-10-2004, 10:19 PM
Occasionally - and we are going to get told off for this ROFL!

bunnyhuggger
26-10-2004, 11:20 PM
Well, I'll get an earbashing too then, cos I use them quite alot. You get a really good mix and in my opinion they're fine so long as you give them a good rinse first and there's no iceberg, onion or beans in them (the salad bags that is, not my ears!)

Pendragon
26-10-2004, 11:32 PM
Ok... not having a go at anoyone but I would never feed these to my rabbits!

I remember reading an article in the Sunday Times last year that revealed they carry all kinds of harmful bacteria, and in many cases are half-decayed by the time they reach our fridges! I only have to look at my local Co-Op's reduced (past date) salads to see they are starting to go mushy at the bottom.

While I realise not everyone can do this, I pick wild greens for my rabbits, and can fill a carrier bag in under 10 mins with a huge variety of natural rabbit salad. One of my major projects for next year now I have a digicam, is to create a website purely to encourage people to go and pick their own, with easy recognition photos and plenty of help.

These greens will keep in my fridge, in a carrier bag, for 10-14 days without going off, so what does that tell you about the freshness of these supermarket salads? Not to mention how they were grown, or how the growers were treated by commerce.

I believe very strongly in rabbit salad... and I would love to help others to go and find these free, organically grown wild herbs for their own rabbits. The rabbits love them, and they are more nutritious (as supermarket veg have been tailored to human palates) as well as being organic and free from any of the politics and commercial pressures put upon vegetable growers.

/rant over! :)

AmberUK
26-10-2004, 11:53 PM
I do pick some greens, though I am gradually building them up. But I got told, that you have to be careful incase dogs have weed on them. Though I am careful to check for spraying how can I check for that - not washing will help! I do get dobber sized danelion leaves though!

Pendragon
27-10-2004, 12:38 AM
Dog wee isn't such a big problem as it once was... you are harking back to the days when people weren't as good with worming dogs as they are now, and the things like Frontline weren't available.

I worry more about wild rabbits where I pick.... but if you only went for a stroll in country areas you could bring back VHD on your shoes... and myxi infected fleas aren't as likely to attach themselves to green food.

Saying that, I now pick in a place where I know there are no wild rabbits and store the greens in the fridge. Fleas (if there are any) hibernate in the cold and would fall to the bottom of your greens bag.

You could always rinse any greens in duliuted Milton (the stuff they sell for disinfecting baby bottles - it can disinfect vegetables too) which would make them safe, and won't harm the buns.

I would far rather pick wild greens any day than use the supermarket stuff. Not only is it better for them, but it is fun, and learning about herbs and their uses for rabbits is continuing a tradition which is in danger of being lost nowadays.

beck
27-10-2004, 07:22 AM
These greens will keep in my fridge, in a carrier bag, for 10-14 days without going off, so what does that tell you about the freshness of these supermarket salads? Not to mention how they were grown, or how the growers were treated by commerce.

That statement really hits home doesn't it! I think I will look in the library for a book with pictures of safe and unsafe plants and go natural salad picking!

Pendragon you have so much interesting and good advice. It is good to get different ideas etc from someone with so much more rabbit knowledge and experiance than me!

jredk04
27-10-2004, 07:50 AM
I only have to look at my local Co-Op's reduced (past date) salads to see they are starting to go mushy at the bottom.


i think we must shop in the same store

LurcherGirl
27-10-2004, 08:20 AM
I also use salad bags from time to time (may be once a fortnight or so). Would love to pick wild greens, but not much of a chance of that in London - and our garden is not big enough to grow it myself either... :( So unfortunately have to stick to the supermarket stuff...

lindac
27-10-2004, 09:30 AM
i sometimes have to give Dubbs packet spinach. my local greengrocer shuts at 4.30 (i dont get home from work til way after that and there isn't one near my office). so then i have to rely on Sainsbury's having fresh spinach, which they never do, so i have to resort to the packet stuff. the only other packet salad i give Dubbs is the watercress, spinach and rocket mix. but he isn't keen on watercress so i usually end up picking it out.

last week i went to Southwark organic market on the Southbank and picked up LOADS of fresh organic veggies. most of the were still covered in mud from being picked that morning/night before.

Holly Go-Lightly
27-10-2004, 09:48 AM
I am very guilty! I use the bags of baby spinach. 2 bags gets me through 10 buns and 6 piggies. They are so easy to pick up from the Sainsbury's Local on the way home. I agree they do go off quickly and I always feed within 2 days of buying.

I am quite lucky where I live in Surrey. We have a lot of independent farm shops around here. They have a great selection of organic veggies.
My buns always have carrot sticks and broccoli florets chopped up ready to go, in the fridge. But if I do run out it is a salad bag in the meantime :oops:

lindac
27-10-2004, 10:02 AM
its hard finding fresh unprocessed vegetables at 7pm in the city of london, and i do mean the city, i live in the middle of the Square Mile. i try to stock up at weekends though from a proper greengrocers

AmberUK
27-10-2004, 10:16 AM
I pick my spinich and herbs from the garden, I must at least get a point for that? :D

Tamsin
27-10-2004, 10:53 AM
I think Sue's right, there are lots of yummy 'wild' plants that are the perfect diet for bunnies. Alfie adores the weeds out of the garden.

Sometimes you do have to compremise a bit though depending whats available.

You know dandelions are quite pretty plants, big bright green leaves and bright yellow flowers. I bet you could grow them in a pot inside. A lot of herbs will grow on a window sill/box/balcony too. Obviously that won't cover your buns whole green supply but it does make a nice addition.

You could also try growing a tray of grass, it makes a good toy and is yummy too if your bun doesn't usually have access to the outdoors/grass.

Tam

bunnytales
27-10-2004, 01:12 PM
One of my major projects for next year now I have a digicam, is to create a website purely to encourage people to go and pick their own, with easy recognition photos and plenty of help.

Sue this would be brill - I'd love to pick some of the wild plants for bunnies but I find them really difficult to recognise from some of the books I have.
I do worry sometimes though as I'm in a very heavily populated wild bunny area so I think I'd be very careful where I went Wild Plant picking.

I am guilty :roll: of buying some of the prepack salad - Watercress and Rocket is the main one but the bunnies only have small amounts of greens anyhow. They also love Fennel which is sometimes really difficult to get hold of and I've heard that in small amounts this is good for the bunny guts.

AmberUK
27-10-2004, 04:12 PM
I already have grass, beetroot tops, carrot tops, dandelion, parsley, carriandor and strawberry (leaves) on the go for them. Lots of jobs at once means the repottings going slower than I would like ;-( Next year I am doing a wildlife garden at the front of the house and that is going ot have some wild plants in there for the bunnies.

Pendragon
27-10-2004, 06:03 PM
They also love Fennel which is sometimes really difficult to get hold of and I've heard that in small amounts this is good for the bunny guts.

It grows wild here!! :shock:
Seriously, all the waste ground & wild places hereabouts are chock full of wild fennel plants. Mine love it and are probably sick of it by now!

Maybe next year I should do a naughty and dig up a few plants for people who want them. When growing wild, it doesn't make the fat bulbs (these are from a special type which is blanched and forced for humans) but they love the feathery leaves, and now the leaves are dying down for the winter, I cut some thick stems for them to chew on instead.

If I ever get my Rabbit Salad site sorted, I'll take pics of the plants as they look when growing, as well as close-ups. It will focus mainly on what grows well round here through necessity, but that's not bad as a starting point - plus I hope to do a calendar of what's best available around the year.

This area is unusually sheltered so I think we'll get a lot even in winter - I went out picking the day before yesterday and there was a huge amount of lush Mallow plants with ginormous leaves, and still plenty of milk & sow thistles about, as well as yarrow & plantain.

Half the fun of it is knowing the beneficial effects... which plants are good for the gut, which are laxative in nature, etc.

luvabun
28-10-2004, 12:27 AM
I've just been on a shopping trip to buy spices for Indian food. I've come back with coriander and fennel seeds...... this may be a stupid question but if I throw 'em in a pot of compost will they grow? Jeez, more window sills taken over by plants grown for the buns

lindac
28-10-2004, 09:29 AM
I can never find Beetroot tops or radish tops round my way, its very annoying. I manageed to get some carrots with the tops still on in Sainsburys last night, Dubbs went mad when he saw them, he LOVES them :lol: Can rabbits eat Coriander?

Lynn
28-10-2004, 09:46 AM
Can rabbits eat Coriander?

Yes, Rob loves coriander, basil, mint, parsley - there's loads more herbs they can eat, but these are his favs. Gave him some chives the other day and he loved them - couldn't find them on the 'edibles' food topic though, so if I shouldn't be giving him these will someone shout please :roll: .

Rob didn't like fennel though - tried to dig it into the carpet - he always does this with food he doesn't like - must frustrate him. :wink:

AmberUK
28-10-2004, 01:16 PM
evil untasty food!

Denny
28-10-2004, 02:16 PM
Herbs and certain plants also help us humans too. As well as the obvious (eating) you can also put some in your bath, the smell is out of this world and helps certain ailments. I also put certain herbs and plants in an oil burner, the smell is so much more natural than artifical air freshners. Use an old wahing bag for bath time though, saves trying to pick everything out when you have finished :lol: :lol: I love lavender in my bath, eucalyptus in an oil burner can help a blocked nose and headaches. Its also cheaper than buying essential oils if you already have the plants. :D

BugBabe
28-10-2004, 02:55 PM
I am still introducing things slowly so still yet to find out what they like - they really dig celery though!!
We are lucky that we have some nice farm shops round here too!

On the packet salad front I heard on the radio that there is as much chlorine in one of those packets to keep a swimming pool clean for a day - how true that is I don't know! Scarey huh! :?

bunnyhuggger
28-10-2004, 02:59 PM
On the packet salad front I heard on the radio that there is as much chlorine in one of those packets to keep a swimming pool clean for a day - how true that is I don't know! Scarey huh! :?

Yes, that's why it's always better to rinse them first. :D

Andi, Boy of Destiny!
28-10-2004, 03:00 PM
On the packet salad front I heard on the radio that there is as much chlorine in one of those packets to keep a swimming pool clean for a day - how true that is I don't know! Scarey huh! :?

I have it on good authority (I think Bertie will be able to confirm this later) that they're washed with dilute bleach.

Hence me not eating them.

luvabun
28-10-2004, 08:49 PM
Thanks for this, my grocery bill is just about to go down as I am not eating bleached stuff any more!!! p.s. even the wild rocket? Don't know if I could do without that

Diddeen
28-10-2004, 10:24 PM
hmmm i dont use packet salads, however i do buy all my veggies for bunny at the supermarket.. im afraid i havent a clue where to find wild ones. I buy carrots, packs of kale, parsley, coriander mainly. are they bleached too? or just the salads?
Chris

Andi, Boy of Destiny!
29-10-2004, 09:26 AM
I think it's just the "prepared" salads.

Bertie
29-10-2004, 09:44 AM
The people I work with (microbiologists) are obsessed with food hygiene. So, every time there's an expose on poor food practices they watch it and come back in the next day with a full run down. So they saw the program that said the salads were washed in bleached. If you wash them off you'll be fine, but the main problem is that these salads are sold as 'ready to eat'. While a human tum can probably cope with the residual bleach left on the leaves, it isn't something that I personally want to risk with my bunnies. If you give the salads a clean before you feed them then there shouldn't be any problem, but then if you have to wash them yourself why are you paying the extra money to have someone else wash it and put it in a bag for you?

I don't buy the prepared stuff anyway. I find that they prefer cheap veggies to more expensive salads and fruit, which suits me just fine.

Oh, and it is just the stuff that's sold as 'ready to eat' that's been washed in this way. I don't know who the main culprits are as I didn't see the program myself.

~Lisa~
29-10-2004, 12:22 PM
I've only ever bought whole vegetables from the supermarkets, such as carrots and cabbage etc. I've never felt the need to buy packet salads as yet. I would love to pick my own stuff for the buns but wouldn't know where to begin. I only recognise dandilions and clover!

@Pendragon, your photography idea is brilliant... it would be a great help to people like me :)

Caz
29-10-2004, 03:32 PM
Prepared salads can also contain Listeria - although food companies are supposed to test before releasing the product for sale; it takes a long time to test and the sell by dates would have expired so often they rely on being able to recall the product later if listeria is found to be present.

Caz

~Lisa~
10-11-2004, 11:28 PM
I would like to try my bunnies on some spinach and curly kale, but the only stuff I can find is prepacked. After thoroughly rinsing it, would both be ok to feed to my guinea pigs aswell?

telekin
11-11-2004, 01:56 AM
I've only ever bought whole vegetables from the supermarkets, such as carrots and cabbage etc
Me too. I don't eat meat anyway, but after a hefty bun shop I look like the healthiest man in town. 75% of it ends up bunwards. I mean, broccoli? I'm never gonna eat that.

You can get carrots with the tops on in Tescos now as well. I dunno about you lot but my rabbit cannot get enough of them. It's like a lapine equivalent of me and nachos.

beck
11-11-2004, 06:17 AM
I only ever go into sainsburys for carrot tops!!

Pendragon
11-11-2004, 09:15 AM
Don't know if this is the same for all branches, but my local Lidl currently have all their fresh veg & fruit on offer at half price...

I temporarily abandoned my priciples in favour of my purse, and yesterday came home with a bunch of carrots with the tops on for 39p, and a huge swede for 29p!

I might nibble a carrot and cook a bit of the swede myself, if the rabbits are happy to share...

Mubby
11-11-2004, 07:26 PM
nope the Mub sometimes gets the cabbage bits i dont like! lol

but all his veg is fresh and i have to prepare it :roll:

Bunnysam
12-11-2004, 02:10 PM
Mine like nothing more than a plate of mange tout served on wild rocket seasoned with honey & mustard.


only joking ... :lol: