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Tamsin
17-08-2004, 01:30 PM
To keep the list easy to understand please format you post as below and check before posting that the edible hasn't been mentioned before. Thank you. :D

If you are introducing new foods to your rabbits diet it should bedone gradually.

SAFE FOOD: Carrot

POISONOUS: Rhubarb

REFERENCE: http://www.carrotcafe.com/f/veggies.html

Diddeen
17-08-2004, 03:13 PM
Safe Food: Broccoli, kale, savoy cabbage, carrots, parsley.

This site has a good list of good and bad veggies, fruit, plants and flowers
http://www.petwebsite.com/rabbits/rabbit_fruit.htm
http://www.petwebsite.com/rabbits/rabbit_plants_flowers.htm

Chris

Lazylops
17-08-2004, 03:19 PM
Rabbit Nutrition by Virginia Richardson has a very comprehensive list

Green foods for Rabbits and Cavies by F R Bell is also very comprehensive

both available from the RWA and Amazon.

annie

Lizzie
17-08-2004, 03:59 PM
I've already posted my pet poisonous thing and that is apple pips! Did it elsewhere though so thought I should add it here. :)

bunnyhuggger
17-08-2004, 05:20 PM
You lot are a nightmare! Could you maybe list the foods instead of giving the websites, as I'm having to search through all those sites and sift through all the foods and it's going to take me hours if not days to sort it out!

If we can get our own list together, I'll ask Tamsin (nicely) if there is any way we could have it like as a reference page, not loads of posts.

Adele
17-08-2004, 05:45 PM
Brilliant Idea Lynda.....us Bunny "Mummys" have enough distractions already without surfing volumes and pages of information...someone needs to organise our lives for us, as we are too busy to organise ourselves!! :lol:

Diddeen
17-08-2004, 07:00 PM
ok then here's mine:
Fruit, vegetables and herbs that are safe to feed a rabbit :
Apple (seedless)
Asparagus
Banana
Basil
Broccoli
Brussel Sprouts
Cabbage
Carrots and Carrot Tops
Cauliflower leaves and stalks
Celery
Chicory Greens
Cucumber
Dill
Endive
Fennel
Grapes
Green Pepper
Kale
Mint
Orange (peeled)
Oregano
Parsley - a good tonic
Red Leaf Lettuce
Red Cabbage
Romaine Lettuce
Savoy Cabbage
Spinach
Tomato
Turnip Greens
Watercress

Vegetables and herbs that should not be fed are:
Apple seeds
Potato and Potato Tops
Rhubarb and Rhubarb Leaves
Tomato Leaves

Diddeen
17-08-2004, 07:01 PM
Some plants and flowers which can be fed to rabbits:
Clover
Dandelion leaves
Groundsel
Marigold
Nasturium

Plants and flowers that are poisonous to rabbits include:
Autumn Crocus
Begonia
Black Nightshade
Busy Lizzie
Buttercups
Carnation
Chrysanthemum
Clematis
Cowslip
Geranium
Hemlock
Laburnum
Laurel
Poison Ivy
Poppy
Yucca

bunnyhuggger
17-08-2004, 07:27 PM
Thank you Chris :D

Adele
17-08-2004, 07:33 PM
Thats more like it Chris, thanks so much, I will print your list off and pin it on the notice board !.
Simba is soooo cute and sooooo cuddly.....what a pretty and very fluffy bunny :D

bunnyhuggger
17-08-2004, 07:41 PM
I've already posted my pet poisonous thing and that is apple pips! Did it elsewhere though so thought I should add it here. :) Thanks Lizzie, I feel that this is one of the ones a lot of people are NOT aware of. Many people just chuck in a quarter of an apple, or a half of an apple or even sometimes a whole one :o (Tch! Tamsin can we have a better 'shocked' smiley, please :D ), and just leave the buns to it. Too much apple can burn the skin around the mouths of buns and cavvies as they are very acidic. Also not that great for children's teeth in large quantities either as it erodes the enamel (used to work in a dental surgery :oops: )

sunshine
18-08-2004, 08:34 PM
Hi

Can I ask a couple of quick questions. Are chinese leaf and pak choi OK as mine are quite fond of both of these. As far as fruit goes I give mine one third of a piece of fruit usually either apple, pear, peach or nectarine and a third of carrot each per day. Is this too much sweet stuff for them? I tried them on kiwi fruit this morning but only Harvey ate his

bunnyhuggger
18-08-2004, 10:55 PM
Can anyone confirm Chinese leaf and Pak Choy for us?

bunnyhuggger
18-08-2004, 10:59 PM
one third of a piece of fruit usually either apple, pear, peach or nectarine and a third of carrot each per day. Is this too much sweet stuff for them? I tried them on kiwi fruit this morning but only Harvey ate his Depends on how big the fruit/carrot is I suppose. I don't give fruit every day as it is full of sugar, I only give is as an occasional treat, maybe once a week. As for carrot, I give about an inch each twice a day (also full of sugar but good for wearing down incisors!) I find a wee bit of melon particularly popular on a hot day specially if it's been kept in the fridge (and I even give some to the buns :lol:)

bunnyhuggger
18-08-2004, 11:02 PM
More SAFE fruits:
Strawberry and husks
Blueberry
Raspberry and leaves

Lynn
18-08-2004, 11:06 PM
Rob wants to ask his 'auntie Lynda' why he can eat strawberries and raspberries but not his favourite 'sugar snap peas' (hee hee) :cry:

bunnyhuggger
18-08-2004, 11:15 PM
Because only BAD rabbits eat sugar snap peas and only good rabbits get to eat scrummy strawberries and raspberries, now get to your bed! :lol:

Parental Guidance required for next bit Lynn:
"Roman farmers left green peas on the vine to poison foraging rabbits"

bunnyhuggger
18-08-2004, 11:26 PM
Safe Food for Rabbits
This list is to help discern safe foods for rabbits. It is not a guide to the nutitional value of these foods.
Why not print it out so the whole family knows what give your rabbit.

Safe foods:


Agrimony
Alfalfa
Apple
Avens
Balm
Banana
Barley
Basil
Beetroot
Blackberry
Borage
Broccoli
Buckwheat
Burnet
Camomile
Caraway
Carrot
Celery
Celeriac
Chervil
Chicory
Chickweed
Chinese leaf
Cleavers
Clover, WHITE
Coltsfoot
Comfrey WILTED SLIGHTLY
Coriander
Corn marigold
Corn spurrey
Cow parsnip
Crosswort
Cucumber
Dandelion
Dead-Nettles
Dill
Dock BEFORE FLOWERING
Endive
Fat hen
Fennel
Goosefoot
Goosegrass
Goutweed BEFORE FLOWERING
Ground elder BEFORE FLOWERING
Hawkbit
Hawkweed
Heather
Hedge parsley
Horseradish
Jerusalem artichoke
Knapweed
Knotgrass
Kohlrabi
Lavender
Lovage
Mallow
Marjoram
Mayweed
Maywort
Meadowsweet
Melon
Milk thistle
Mugwort
Nipplewort
Oats
Orache
Oxeye daisy
Parsley
Parsnip
Pear
Peppermint
Pigweed
Plantain
Pumpkin
Radish GREENS
Raspberry
Sage
Savory
Sanfoin
Shepherd's purse
Silverweed
Sow thistle
Soya
Strawberry
Swiss Chard
Tare
Tomatoes
Trefoil
Vetch
Vine leaves
Watercress
Watermelon
Wheat
Yarrow

Safe in moderation:

Brussels sprouts
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Corn
Groundsel
Kale
Lettuce
Molasses
Mustard greens
Spinach
Tallow
Turnip

NOT SAFE:


Arum
Bigwort
Bindweed
Bluebell
Bryony
Buttercup
Celandine
Clover RED
Colchicum
Corncockle
Cowslip
Cuckoo pint
Dog's Mercury
Elder after flowering
Euphorbia
Evergreens
Fool's parsley
Foxglove
Ground ivy
Hemlock
Henbane
Kingcup
Meadow Saffron
Milkweed
Nightshade
Ragwort
Scarlet Pimpernel
Spurge
Toadflax
Tomato LEAVES
Traveller's joy
Beans
Peach leaves
Plum leaves
Potato SPROUTS
Rhubarb
Wood sorrel

Safe tree and shrub leaves:

Should always be fresh young leaves:


Acacia
Apple
Beech
Birch
Blackberry
Cherry
Hazel
Horse Chestnut
Lime
Mountain Ash
Mulberry
Pear
Poplar (not black)
Raspberry
Strawberry

Safe twigs:


Apple
Birch
Blackberry
Fir
Hazel
Hawthorn
Maple
Pear
Raspberry
Spruce
Willow

Unsafe twigs:
Acacia
Apricot
Azalea
Beech
Box
Cherry
Clematis
Elder
Holly
Ivy
Laburnum
Mistletoe
Nux vomica
Oak
Oleander
Peach
Periwinkle
Plum
Privet
Rhododendron
Rosewood
Snowberry
Spindleberry
Thorn apple
Waxplant
Wisteria
Yew
All evergreens not mentioned in safe twig list

Safe flowers:

Aster
Carnation
Daisy
Geranium
Geum
Helenium
Hollyhock
Honesty
Marguerite
Marigold
Michaelmas daisy
Nasturtium
Rose
Stock
Sunflower
Wallflower

Unsafe flowers:


Acacia
Aconite
Antirrhinum
Anemone
Brugmansia
Columbine
Crocus
Daffodil
Dahlia
Delphinium
Feverfew
Gypsophila
Hellebore
Hyacinth
Iris
Larkspur
Lily of the Valley
Lobelia
Love-in-a-mist
Lupin
Narcissus
Poppy
Primrose
Snowdrop
Tulip
Any bulbs

REFERENCE: http://earthhome.tripod.com/rabsafe.html

(Once we have a comprehensive list, duplicates will be sifted out)

Lynn
18-08-2004, 11:26 PM
He's off to bed with his Timothy Hay (dreaming of the days when his silly mum thought it was OK to feed him sugar snaps).

Seriously though, I'll find this list very useful, as I do find you read lots of conflicting information about what's 'good' and 'bad' bunny veg / fruit.

bunnyhuggger
18-08-2004, 11:34 PM
Lynn, there are conflicting view of what's safe and unsafe food for rabbits. That's why it's always better to question. Peas were on this list but I took them off as I'm still not happy about rabbits eating them (however, that is only my opinion). If there is ever any doubt, err on the safe side and don't give it. There's loads of yummy alternatives.

Oh and you're not a silly mum, you're a wonderful and caring mum, and no matter how much he scowls at you, he still loves you! :lol:

bunnyhuggger
18-08-2004, 11:57 PM
Is it bad for my bunny to snack on dog or cat food?

Yes, it is very dangerous for a rabbit to snack on dog or cat food. These foods are designed for carnivores not for herbivores. They are high in protein and fat as well as carbohydrates in the form of grains, usually corn. Although rabbits can eat small amounts of dog or cat food and appear to be normal, there can be insidious changes that take place over time. Excessive levels of protein can lead to kidney damage; excessive levels of fat and grain-based carbohydrates can lead to obesity. However, by far the most dangerous side effect in rabbits that eat dry dog or cat food is the disturbance of the normal intestinal flora that will ultimately lead to intestinal distress and death. We have seen rabbits become seriously ill and some die within 24 hours of eating dog food due to acute intestinal disorders. Please keep all dog and cat food out of the reach of your rabbit!

REFERENCE: http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&A=502&S=5&SourceID=43

bunnyhuggger
19-08-2004, 12:02 AM
No Chocolate for Bunnies!
Southeastern PA-DE HRS Newsletter
(reprinted with permission)
My heart was broken this past Valentine's Day holiday. What started out to be a delightful evening, resulted in the untimely deaths of three of our beloved rabbits within 36 hours.

My wonderful husband and two young sons were very proud of the beautiful roses and the 2 lb. box of very expensive chocolates they they presented me with on Valentine's evening. I opened my gift, we each had creamy, delicious piece of candy, and I placed the box of chocolates on top of our entertainment center, which is about 5 feet from the floor and went off to dinner at a nearby restaurant. After dinner, we returned hime, and eventually went to bed.

Sometime in the middle of the night we were awakened by a strange sound coming from the living room. We ran in to find the box of chocolates on the floor being devoured by our large warren of bunnies. I found all of the candy gone except for two already bitten into pieces! Within 36 hours, 3 of my bunnies were dead!

We still cannot understand how the rabbits got to the box of chocolate. Chocolate is a poison to animals! It should never be fed as a treat, or made available in any way to your rabbits! Please take extreme caution when having anything in the house that can harm your precious companions. We've learned the hard way, that even though the box was 5 feet off the floor, things happen that are beyond our control.

Please store unsafe products up, away, and behind closed doors! We are very fortunate that we did not lose any more of our bunnies.

To my bunnies... we love you!

REFERENCE: http://homepage.mac.com/mattocks/morfz/nochocolate.html

bunnytales
19-08-2004, 11:04 AM
Hi Mad Forum Folk!

Could I ask your advice please - on a recent visit to my Vets when discussing diet I was told not to feed Banana as its too high in sugars and carbohydrates for bunnies tummies - have you found any probs -

Both my bunnies love it and I only fed a small slice as an occassional treat but obviously don't want to risk upset tumms.

Cheers Mateys

Bunnysam
19-08-2004, 12:02 PM
Is it ok to feed occasionally a piece of dried banana chip and raisins from my Fruit & Fibre cereal?!!

Rosie loves it. I only gave her one chip and one raisin last night just in case.

Lynn
19-08-2004, 12:26 PM
Hi Bunnysam - Ohhh, don't mention the dreaded 'dried fruit' Bunnyhugger will get you !!! :wink: Only joking, however, Lynda did point out to me that dried fruit is full of sugar, and that the fresh stuff is so much tastier and healthier.

I've cut it out of Rob's diet now - he used to get dried fruit as a treat in the morning, when he had been a good boy overnight and used his litter trays (he has free run of his bedroom all night). Now I go in in the morning waving a sprig of herb i.e. parsley, basil, mint, coriander etc, and he seems to be just as happy with this.

Your bunnies are gorgeous by the way :)

Bunnysam
19-08-2004, 12:52 PM
Hi Lynn

Thank you for your reply. I will try to resist from now on.

Its hard when you have a tickling face sniffing around your fingers for more!

Yes they are rather sweet and I miss them so much when I am here at work in London. Billy looks a bit squashed in the picture!!

Stephanie
19-08-2004, 01:29 PM
Can anyone confirm Chinese leaf and Pak Choy for us?

Pok Choi is fine (my two luv it), don't know about chinese leaf though !!

without_halo
19-08-2004, 03:31 PM
Chinese leaf is meantioned in the safe list above.

Diddeen
19-08-2004, 10:55 PM
Anyone know why in that last list posted Kale and cabbage are down as safe in moderation? I have tried lots of things with my bunny and the one thing he will eat apart from carrots is kale. If i cant get that he gets cabbage but he would eat kale all day long if i left it there for him..
Whats wrong with it? Looking at that list i am going to introduce some herbs as i havent tried any of those before.

Oh and Adele... your bunny in your avatar is more fluffy than mine!!! he/she's soooo gorgeous!
Chris

bunnyhuggger
20-08-2004, 07:52 AM
HAven't a clue! However these two references may have something to do with it. Some rabbits seem to be more prone to gas, GI stasis, and sludgey bladder though, and I am presuming they may be erring on the safe side. I too give my rabbits kale and cabbage (to no ill effect so far) but when I run out of kale, I don't buy another bag for a week or so just in case I'm overloading!

Here's what I found:

Gas - What do I do ?

The culprit that causes gas problems in our bunnies is believed to exist in the diet we feed them, specifically large amounts of: broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and kale. Some bunnies are susceptible to gas more than others no matter their size or breed. Completely removing such veggies from their diet is not necessary as moderation is the key. To date, the listed culprits have not been proven as the causes of gas and opinions vary widely. But it is fact that rabbits do commonly suffer from gas, and if ignored, the problem is potentially fatal. SYMPTOMS: When a rabbit suffers from gas, it is pertinent that you treat your bunny as quickly as possible. Symptoms that are most commonly presented include:
- Gurgling noises coming from your rabbit’s stomach.

- Bunny will become lethargic preferring to be left alone often sitting with her eyes partially closed.

- Significant decrease in appetite (even with her most favorite foods).

- Bunny will lay in an uncomfortable or unusual manner-partially on her side to ease the pain (most likely with the front part of her body held upright while her hind legs seem relaxed); or she may not want to lay down at all instead preferring to sit upright with a very straight posture.

- Her stomach will feel very hard, or extremely soft.

- Her temperature will be lower than normal (below 100F) WHAT TO DO:

- Check your bunny’s temperature – If it has dropped below normal, you must warm her up before her system shuts down (hypothermia). Place her on a heating pad, warm water bottle, under a heating lamp, or hold her against your body. Continue to monitor her temperature regularly (every half hour so) to make sure it does not drop further.

- Give your bunny a simethicone product orally - Commonly sold over-the-counter products include Infant’s Phazyme, or Infant’s Mylicon. Give 1/3 of a dropper (0.3ml) for smaller bunnies, or ½ dropper (0.5ml) for larger bunnies every 4-6 hours until your bunny appears to lay down in her normal manner, or she beings to eat again. A Gas relief product is a good thing to have on hand in your rabbit care emergency kit.

- Take care of her digestive tract and make sure she is hydrated – Chances are your bunny has not eaten because of the pain. We must make sure the good flora (bacteria) in her intestines are still present in her system. Give her some acidophilus twice a day during this episode, or one ml of Benebac. Pedialyte can be added to make a manageable liquid if you are using acidophilus in powder form to syringe the mixture directly into her mouth. Give as much as she will take, being careful to drop the liquid slowly into the side of her mouth. Do not squirt it into her mouth as she could breath it into her lungs.

- Apply tummy massage – Rubbing your bunny’s tummy in a gentle manner will help to ease the pain and expedite the relief.

- Watch her appetite and make sure she is eating – Even if she will only feed on fruits, it is very important that she continues to eat. Episodes can last between 2 to 12 hours, you should contact your veterinarian if symptoms persist more than one day.
REFERENCE:http://www.washingtonhouserabbitsociety.org/faq.asp?id=2


and the other reason could be high oxalate content (ie. calcium), which I'm still having a look at and will post when I find it!

bluebunny
20-08-2004, 09:26 AM
What amonts should fruit and veg be given?

Kara
20-08-2004, 09:34 AM
Fruit should be kept to a minimal ie treats only, I give Cookie and Buggsy a tiny piece of apple a day and thats it on the fruit about the size of ummmmmmm £2.00 coin???? roughly!

Veg depends on how big they are ie my two mini babies have a ramekin dish of dry food and two spring green leaves each, a handful of leaf mix and odds and sods of herbs, so for a bigger bunny I havent got a clue lol

Kara :lol:

Tamsin
20-08-2004, 10:07 AM
If used to it they can have a couple of mugs worth a day. It needs to be introduced/built up slowly though.

Tam

bunnyhuggger
20-08-2004, 10:47 AM
Just had a thought and felt I'd better mention it cos there are some breeders using this forum.

I believe that some herbs shouldn't be given to pregnant and lactating does, I'll try and find some information about this, unless anyone else can help.

Also remember that herbs have medicinal properties as well. See:
http://www.galens-garden.mcmail.com/herbs_for_rabbits_and_guinea_pig.htm

Diddeen
20-08-2004, 10:12 PM
Thanks for the info about gas.. i didnt know about all that. I usually give mine a handfull of kale every other day but no probs so far.. will have to keep an eye on him
Chris

anon101
23-08-2004, 10:53 AM
Can anyone confirm Chinese leaf and Pak Choy for us?

I'm sure Pak Choy is OK to feed. I think somebody mentioned that on Tufty.

Louise

anon101
23-08-2004, 11:09 AM
[quote="bunnyhuggger"]Safe Food for Rabbits
This list is to help discern safe foods for rabbits. It is not a guide to the nutitional value of these foods.
Why not print it out so the whole family knows what give your rabbit.

NOT SAFE:

Bindweed


Safe tree and shrub leaves:

quote]

According to Virginia Richardson in Rabbit Lopeadia BINDWEED is safe to feed. I feed it to my Rabbit's two/three tme's a week and I have done for the past few months with no probs.

ANY desidious (TREE'S THAT DROP THERE LEAVE'S) tree leave's/branche's are OK to feed to Rabbit's except OAK and ELDER. Again this is quoting Virginia Richardson.

My two love Rowan and Lime.

Louise

anon101
23-08-2004, 11:14 AM
Could I ask your advice please - on a recent visit to my Vets when discussing diet I was told not to feed Banana as its too high in sugars and carbohydrates for bunnies tummies - have you found any probs -

Cheers Mateys

I feed Banana as an ocassional treat. I'm sure it is OK if you fed it fresh and in moderation. Banana is good way to get weight on a thin bunny.

Louise

bunnyhuggger
23-08-2004, 11:51 AM
Thanks for your input Louise, this is what I mean about so many differing opinions on safe and unsafe food for buns. I'm no expert or authority on foods for rabbits, but I trawl the net for any information I can find. I copied that list from the reference address at the bottom of that particular post. There has been some debate before about bindweed, and I don't think there was any specific outcome. Some people don't even know what bindweed is or looks like anyway! :lol:

If there is any doubt about what to feed your buns, err on the safe side and stick to foods you are confident with.

bunnyhuggger
26-08-2004, 01:10 PM
Most Common Herbs Used for Rabbits
Information contributed from members of the Herbal Rabbit group. Individual acknowledgements are shown.

"Ideas are like rabbits. You get a couple and
learn how to handle them and pretty soon, you have a dozen." John Steinbeck

Basil
Leaves can be rubbed on insect bites to reduce itching and inflammation. Leaves can also be taken as a warming and uplifting tonic for nervous exhaustion or any cold condition. The juice with an equal quantity of honey can be used for ringworm and itching skin. An infusion (tea) of Basil combined with Wood Betony can be given immediately after birthing to prevent a retained placenta or afterbirth. Cautions- do not use essential oils externally or internally. Harvest before flowering. ~ Cheryl



"Comfrey
Highly recommended for rabbits. It is a digestive aid, helps with wool block and is used for many other things. It is an old remedy which should under no circumstances be discounted. In extreme doses, comfrey can cause diarrehea. This is its effects working too hard and if left unnoticed, the rabbit may dehydrate. When used with common sense, Comfrey is one of the best herbs we can give the bunnies!" Rebecca

Dandelion
"Dandelion is an excellent food given fresh in unlimited quantities. Fermenting or wilted plants can cause bloat. Dandelions are one of the most nutritious food plants for rabbits. Being rich in protien and poor in fiber. The digestibility percentage is high at an estimated 70%. Well known for it's curative powers. The bitter milky sap stimulates the working of all glands, including the milk glands of lactating does. The plant has both laxative and astringent qualities and regulates constipation and diarrhea.

Dandelion is good for many things in people and can be used for rabbits with these problems also: preventing osteoporosis (for the old bunny), bladder infections, lactating, liver problems, swelling, tonsilitis, warts, and pneumonia.

I feed alot of Dandelion every day, especially to my babies and they just love it, but you have to be careful because that is all that they will want and won't eat their pellets. So I limit it to a few small handfuls a day." Cheryl

Dandelion Made My Bunnies Glow With Health!
"I have been giving my rabbits Dandelion leaves every morning for the last two weeks. Two (2) leaves to my Dwarfs and four (4) leaves to my Mini Rex and 6 to 8 leaves to my Flemish. After two weeks they all seem to glow! They are eating well, increased drinking, their fur is looking great and recovering from moult in fine fashion - not lingering in moulting for weeks and missing the shows. I now have a little "dandie" garden, because I can't believe the extreme changes with my concentrated efforts of daily dandelion leaves." Deanna

Lavender
Common Lavender - or - Narrow leaved Lavender - or - Lavender Spike (Lavendula augustfolia)
"Lavender is not to be used lightly or frivously in breeding stock. It has a direct effect upon the uterus in helping to expel the contents, dead or alive, as well as being a diuretic. A late birthing doe will benefit from a little Lavender in order to naturally speed the process and it saves using drugs. The flowers are actually a mild tranquilizer, acting upon the heart in easing blood pressure rather than acting upon the brain as an anti-stimulant. In other words, good for a stressed out rabbit. Lavender Cotton (Abrotonum foemina, Chamaecyparissus) is a specific medicine for internal worms, and also assists the kidneys in cleansing and breaking up of stones. It also helps reduce swellings if applied outwardly, and is generally good taken internally for the liver, chest and uterus." Judy


Lavender is analgesic or pain-relieving, anticonvulsive, anitdepressant, anitmicrobial, antirheumatic, antiseptic, anitspasmodic, antitoxic, gas-relieving, bile-stimulating, deodorant, diuretic, insect-repelling, relaxing, circulation-stimulating, tonic and worm-repelling. Effective against burns & scalds, neutralizes the venom of insect bites & stings.

Lavender Oil - Inhaled or ingested, it treats respiratory conditions. Orally, it relieves nausea, prevents flatulence, alleviates cramping, improves digestion & clears urinary tract infections. Applied to the skin & coat, it helps repel insects & treats abscesses, fungal infections, ringworm, lice, scabies, sores, sunburn, dermatitis, earache, wounds & inflammation. Reduces anxiety & lifts the spirits.

"I haven't tryed straight Lavendar Oil by mouth or used it that way on my rabbits. I have used it in apple cider vinegar or water. I have made Lavendar tea from the flowers to give my rabbits by mouth and I've sprinkled some of the flowers on top of their food. One of my books says to add 3 to 5 drops of the oil on a sugar cube and take twice a day orally. So you may want to duilte it with carrier oil, water, or apple cider vinegar." Patty

Marjoram, Sweet (Majorana, Sampiucus, Amaracus)
A diuretic, opens obstructions of the liver and spleen, is good for colic pains and for disorders of the head (whatever they are) and settles the nerves. ~ Judy

Marjoram, Wild (Origanum Vulgare) For "colds"- although rabbits do not actually contract the headcold as we know it. Useful for coughs, pleurisy and obstruction of the lungs and uterus (take care here) and is also calming. This one, crushed and applied direct, will help control swellings and eruptions and bruises. Apparently the distilled oil of this will ease toothache. ~ Judy

Mint
Used for colds, eye inflammation, liver stimulant, and used to relax the muscles of the digestive tract and stimulate bile flow so are useful for indigestion, flatulence and colic and similar conditions. Reduces milk flow. Cautions are to avoid prolonged use, it can irritate the mucous membranes. Do not give any form of mint to young babies. To be harvested just before flowering. ~ Cheryl

Plantain (Plantago spp.)Character: Slightly sweet, salty, and bitter; cool, mainly drying

Leaves: Relaxing expectorant, tonify mucous membranes, reduce phlegm, antispasmodic, topically healing
"The leaves soothe urinary tract infections and irritations. Good for gastric inflammations. Juice pressed from fresh leaves is given orally for inflamed mucous membranes in cystitis, diarrhea and lung infections. Use the juice for inflamations, sores, and wounds. Plantain does not cause digestive problems. The plant regulates the function of the intestines and is generally good for the mucous membranes. Useful in the diet of weanlings and can be harvested year around." Cheryl

Rosemary

Ideal for exhaustion, weakness, and depression. The arial parts (stems, leaves) invigorate the circulation, stimulate the digestion, and are good for cold conditions. Harvest fresh year-round. ~ Cheryl

Sage
Reduces lactation when weaning, digestive stimulant and a uterine stimulant. This herb should be used with caution and should be avoided during pregnancy. Sage contains Thujone, which can trigger fits in epileptics. ~ Cheryl

Thyme
The arial parts (stems, leaves) are ideal for deep-seated chest infections marked by thick yellow phlegm. They are also a useful digestive remedy, warming for stomache, chills and associated diarrhea (irritable bowel). Expels worms. Cautions are to avoid therapeutic doses of thyme and thyme oil in any form because the herb is a uterine stimulant. Thyme oil can irritate the mucous membranes, so dilute well. Harvest before and during flowering in summer; discard the woody stems. ~ Cheryl

REFERENCE: http://www.healthypetcorner.com/rabbit.html

Mubby
26-08-2004, 07:28 PM
More SAFE fruits:
Strawberry and husks
Blueberry
Raspberry and leaves

PHEWWWWWWWWWWWW!!!! :wink:


Mubby likes a strawberry!! :lol:

Mubby
26-08-2004, 07:36 PM
excellent information!!!!!


I was just wondering if anyone could tell me about grapes :roll:

im guessing mayb they are a no no.... but mubby is rather partial :roll:

sunshine
26-08-2004, 09:40 PM
I think seedless grapes are OK and my bunnies love them :D

bunnyhuggger
26-08-2004, 09:50 PM
Yep, Anne's right, grapes are fine but only as a treat as they are full of sugar too. I go for the seedless ones only, as I'm not sure about grape seeds. Grape seeds are small enough to cause blockages if not digested properly, so I personally don't give them. Also grapes help to rid toxins from the blood (allegedly!). You can feed them the stalks as well providing you remember to wash them and the grapes first. You can buy vine balls as rabbit toys..............somewhere on the net but I can't remember where!

Mubby
27-08-2004, 10:24 AM
excellent thanks for that and yes its always seedless I buy!! ( too lazy to spit pips out!!lol) i thought they might be bad because of the sugar content but he only gets one occasionaly!! :wink:



thanks alot :D

Mubby
27-08-2004, 01:03 PM
ok again id like your opinions as ive read many different things!!

how much should i feed my rabbit ? some sites / books say unlimeted amounts to under year old bunnys , and some say go by weight of bunny.

Mubby gets pellets mainly but he likes the " luxury food " as it was called from the petshop , the red and green and yellow crunchy stuff & seeds ! ( sorry not explaining very well!lol )

should he just get the luxury stuff as a treat ? i usually put a small corner of it in his bowl next to his pellets ??

also talking of pet shop treats.... ive bought yogurt drops and crunchy carrot biscuits... are these ok ? im guessing they are as they are made for rabbits!!

and those seed stick things that hang from the cage ? ive also seen ones like " popcorn and honey sticks" ??? but i was worried about the sugar in those!


please advise!! i dont want to have a fat unhealthy wabbit!! :D

bunnyhuggger
27-08-2004, 01:31 PM
also talking of pet shop treats.... ive bought yogurt drops and crunchy carrot biscuits... are these ok ? im guessing they are as they are made for rabbits!!

and those seed stick things that hang from the cage ? ive also seen ones like " popcorn and honey sticks" ??? but i was worried about the sugar in those!

Not sure about feeding a young bunny, maybe others can help you there. There's also a link to the RWA info site on feeding here http://www.houserabbit.co.uk/rwf/articles/feeding.htm

I personally don't give any type of sweet treats ie yoghurt drops, chocolate drops, biscuits, honey sticks, etc, even if bought from a pet shop. They are not really necessary, can make a rabbit fat, cause tooth decay, and wreak havoc on the gut system. Pet shops only sell them to make profit, they aren't a good idea at all (no matter which brand makes them!) unless used very very sparingly and only as a treat. I prefer to give my rabbits healthy treats like a blueberry, a grape, a bit strawberry or raspberry, much tastier and much healthier! And please do NOT give dried fruit, there's no point, give them fresh all the time and only small amounts occasionally. Great for using as a bribe! :lol:

Mubby
27-08-2004, 02:11 PM
also talking of pet shop treats.... ive bought yogurt drops and crunchy carrot biscuits... are these ok ? im guessing they are as they are made for rabbits!!

and those seed stick things that hang from the cage ? ive also seen ones like " popcorn and honey sticks" ??? but i was worried about the sugar in those!

Not sure about feeding a young bunny, maybe others can help you there. There's also a link to the RWA info site on feeding here http://www.houserabbit.co.uk/rwf/articles/feeding.htm

I personally don't give any type of sweet treats ie yoghurt drops, chocolate drops, biscuits, honey sticks, etc, even if bought from a pet shop. They are not really necessary, can make a rabbit fat, cause tooth decay, and wreak havoc on the gut system. Pet shops only sell them to make profit, they aren't a good idea at all (no matter which brand makes them!) unless used very very sparingly and only as a treat. I prefer to give my rabbits healthy treats like a blueberry, a grape, a bit strawberry or raspberry, much tastier and much healthier! And please do NOT give dried fruit, there's no point, give them fresh all the time and only small amounts occasionally. Great for using as a bribe! :lol:

thanks Lynda , nope i never give dried fruit , only fresh for my bunnykins. I think i got carriedaway and bought lots of treats!! and they just sat in the cupboard since as ive been scared to give him them!!lol

fresh fruit / veg as treats only from here on in :D :lol:

bunnyhuggger
27-08-2004, 02:45 PM
:lol: Good, well done you, Wee Mubby will remain Wee Mubby and not progress to Big Mubby!!! :wink:

Mubby
27-08-2004, 05:19 PM
:lol: Good, well done you, Wee Mubby will remain Wee Mubby and not progress to Big Mubby!!! :wink:

hahahha!! that made me larf!! :lol:

bunnymad
30-08-2004, 09:55 AM
watercress (maori food or non-maori garden weed LOL)
puha (maori food or non-maori garden weed LOL)
willow branches and leaves (not the curly leaf type) (good for teeth)
old pinecones (good for the teeth)

bunnyhuggger
30-08-2004, 10:58 AM
:lol: What on EARTH is Puha??? :lol:

bunnymad
30-08-2004, 11:01 PM
I have added a photo of it in my photos for you to have a look at :P

Do you have it over there?

bronie

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v373/bunnymad/bugzee%20and%20shadow/puha.jpg

bunnyhuggger
30-08-2004, 11:24 PM
Hmmmmm, not sure, looks a bit like milk thistle, does it have a white sap? or a yellow dandelion like flower?

Mubby
31-08-2004, 04:25 PM
Gave Mubster a Chunk of cucumber today .. he loved it!! :D

bunnymad
31-08-2004, 11:12 PM
I have added a photo of puha in flower in my album. Yes it has a white sap like dandelion which they also like to eat:)
[/img]

Kiwibunny
01-09-2004, 05:54 AM
I've given up on dandelions, as I have so many different varieties on my place and I can't tell them apart, yet some are supposed to be not as good as others. Now I only give my birds chickweed. With puha (sow thistle) I only give the leaf, not the stalk. I have been SO confused over foods, so thanks to the kind people who took the time to make the lists on this thread. The confusion started when I first got cavies and different sites had different lists of safe and unsafe foods. Finally I picked out the few vege/fruit that I could easily obtain fresh all year round and were on most safe lists, ie red & green sweet peppers, carrots, parsley, apple, orange, celery, alfalfa sprouts, little bits of broccolli. Then the other day I saw on a US rabbit site that parsley is bad, red clover is bad, lucerne is bad....and so on. Aaarrrgghhh!!!!! I'm just going to stick to the things on the lists here. By the way, my cavies have had parsley, lucerne chaff and hay that contains some red clover almost daily for 2 years and are both well. But it's worrying that I MAY have been feeding the wrong things. Currently Tweed the bunny is having the same as the cavies plus rabbit pellets, whereas the cavies have their own pellets. Re grass. The cavies have always had lots of fresh grass but I won't let Tweed graze or give her cut grass because of the worry of calicivirus. No myx here, but in 1997 some ****** stupid farmers illegally introduced the rabbit calicivirus in a major bio-security breach and a lot of rabbits died. My vet says there is little chance of the virus in my area now, but I don't trust the local farmers - especially after what happened in 1997. It's a horrible fatal disease that causes the blood to clot up. There is no myx in NZ and before 1979 rabbits were disease-free. There is a vaccine, but I don't have enough info about it and the possible risks yet, also my vet doesn't carry it. So no grass for Tweed, unless I grow her some in trays, which I'll do come spring. Bronie, have you vaccinated yours for RCD? Sorry about the v long post guys!!

bunnymad
01-09-2004, 07:19 AM
I haven`t taken Bugzee and Shadow in to have the jab yet. But I have read that there is 3 strains of the virus and the jab only covers one!

I feed my pellets and heaps of hay, lucerne chaff and maintenance mix. I also give them parsley raw rolled oats and wheat bix They eat grass when they are outside. The closed farm is about 4km away, so thats a bit of a worry.
Different types of dandelions :?: Thats news to me. Oks thinking on it, there is the flat to the ground and the standing up on :?: mmmmm

What does chick weed look like as its good for bunnies too I have read.

bronie

bunnyhuggger
03-09-2004, 01:48 PM
According to Virginia Richardson in Rabbit Lopeadia BINDWEED is safe to feed. I feed it to my Rabbit's two/three tme's a week and I have done for the past few months with no probs.

Louise

According to Virginia Richardson MRCVS (Rabbit Nutrition book), Bindweed/Convolvulus is listed under the most poisonous plants on page 38.

Strange that she should put the same plant in different categories :? This is where the confusion comes in, so I'd play safe and not feed it to buns!

AmberUK
03-09-2004, 02:06 PM
There is that one that looks like a dandelion but without the leaves having serated edges.

Picking wild stuff is confusing!


Is turnip tops ok?

bunnyhuggger
03-09-2004, 02:47 PM
:lol: AmberUK, Virginia Richardson does a good book on Rabbit Nutrition, it's got colour pictures and descriptions of edible wild plants in it too. I think it costs around £6 or £7.

Kara
04-09-2004, 11:50 AM
Anybunny know if 'doc' leaves are ok? the only way to describe these is the things we used to rub on stinging nettle stings lol???

Fanks muchly x

ps at my mums on internet waiting for dress fitting!

bunnyhuggger
04-09-2004, 03:20 PM
Dock leaves are supposed to be fine until the plant starts flowering, then you shouldn't let the buns eat the leaves.

sunshine
04-09-2004, 07:14 PM
Louise said:-According to Virginia Richardson in Rabbit Lopeadia BINDWEED is safe to feed. I feed it to my Rabbit's two/three tme's a week and I have done for the past few months with no probs.

Lynda said:-
According to Virginia Richardson MRCVS (Rabbit Nutrition book), Bindweed/Convolvulus is listed under the most poisonous plants on page 38.


Coincidentally I bought the Rabbitlopaedia today and I've checked it does say bindwind is OK to feed whereas the rabbit nutrition book by the same author says that its poisonous. Confusing or what. The rabbitlopaedia also says not to feed cabbage as too much has been found to cause goitre in rabbits.

Mubby
04-09-2004, 11:52 PM
mubby dosnt seem to eat much hay....

the hay i have is very dusty :? i bought it from a large pet store....

it was the only hay they had :?

is there different types of hay ????


nic x

bunnyhuggger
04-09-2004, 11:55 PM
yes there are Nic, timothy hay is best if you can get it. Do you know any riding stables, they might have some good quality stuff. We get ours in McCash's in Perth. Ask Angela (Thumps) where she gets hers.

Mubby
05-09-2004, 12:32 AM
ooooh ok ill ask her!! thanks :D

ClaireS
13-09-2004, 09:50 AM
Hi, a few questions, my rabbits are now having a nice lot of veg and one piece of fruit a day, I have a new very timid GP who is a year old and will not each much. Is it right that they can have more fruit than the rabbits? Can rabbits eat pinapple and can either of them have the green on top of the pineapple? And lastly can they both eat banana skin?
Thanks for your help :)

Kiwibunny
14-09-2004, 07:30 AM
Claire, GPs need plenty of vitamin C so encourage your shy little one to eat by offering him a nice wide variety of fresh fruit and veges every day. He will soon show you which ones he likes. It's unusual for a piggie to be a shy feeder, cos they generally are little eating machines. Maybe have his general health/teeth checked? Pineapple I know IS good for rabbits (it apparently help prevent furballs or fur blockages or something). About the tops and about banana skins, I don't know. Banana is OK in small quantities (can be fattening).

bluebunny
16-09-2004, 09:48 PM
can rabbits have sweet heart cabbage????????

bunnyhuggger
16-09-2004, 10:00 PM
I think that's ok, at least I hope so :shock: , mine get a bit each :?

bluebunny
16-09-2004, 10:04 PM
i usually just have a normal whatever you call it cabbage, my dad got me some bits for the rabbits and a whole sweet heart cabbage just wanted to check its ok for them to eat before i gave them some.

beck
03-10-2004, 10:49 AM
On the list of safe foods is radish leaves.

What about the actual radish?

I have just bought some radish with leaves, will just give the leaves for now, so does anyone know? . . .

Bertie
07-10-2004, 07:59 PM
Can bunnies eat privet hedge? I'm not planning on feeding them vast quantities, it's just that the house we're buying has a hedge curving round the patio and I want to know if it's safe for them to be nibbling at it, or if I need to fence it off and maybe think about getting rid of it.

bunnyhuggger
07-10-2004, 08:19 PM
Nope Privet hedge leaves are poisonous, not a good idea. Although I did read somewhere that the berries are ok, but what's the point when there are other delicious things to eat instead. I'd get rid of it and build a fence or a wall (remembering rabbits can jump high and dig deep!)

As for radishes, not sure about this one but do know that some people give them to their buns. It may be that the buns themselves just don't like the peppery taste. So jury's out on that one.

luvabun
19-10-2004, 04:14 PM
This link has lots of info.
http://homepage.mac.com/mattocks/morfz/rabcare.html#bond

Also, to view past posts, I think you just keep scrolling down then click on the next page number. good luck

Sweetie
08-02-2005, 08:55 AM
Hi All,

Is mange tout ok? My Elvis loves it along with little cabbage leaves, peeled slices of apple and the occasional sprout. For some reason he wont eat carrots!

Strange little bunny!

:bunny:

bunnyhuggger
08-02-2005, 11:46 AM
Lots of people seem to give their buns mange tout, however I don't but that's only my choice. I don't give any peas or pods to my buns. There seems to be several schools of thought:

- peas are not to be given, but pods are ok
- all parts (pea and pod) can be given
- peas are poisonous (?)

So I guess it's up to you, sorry if that's not much help :lol: :roll:

Sweetie
08-02-2005, 11:50 AM
Thanks Lynda,

Elvis loves it, hes been eating it for a few weeks and cant get enough of it along with celery and apple.

I was just a bit concerned as it isnt on any of the lists on here.

Thanks

I LuV MaH BuNs
21-02-2005, 09:51 PM
Can they eat Thyme?

bunnyhuggger
21-02-2005, 09:53 PM
yes, it's thought to be safe, but some buns don't like the taste of it, it's quite strong. It's supposed to be useful for ridding buns of worms.

Lynsey
03-04-2005, 02:31 PM
Hi
I've just trawled through all the postings on this topic and found nothing on courgette or leek. As courgettes are kind of related to cucumbers I guess they are ok but it's funny no-one seems to mention it.
Looking forward to some suggestions!

Lynsey

beck
03-04-2005, 03:07 PM
Hi,
I would think either are ok for bunnies, although leeks might be an aquired taste, there quite oniony aren't they?
Actually thinking about I did buy a courgette for Blueberry a while ago, but it had some teeth marks in it but she didn't actually eat it :roll: and for Blue thats saying something!! :lol:

p.s. this topic is in the sticky -useful topics at the top of this page.

Caz
03-04-2005, 03:24 PM
Mine ignored leek - I haven't tried courgette.

Caz

Caz
07-04-2005, 01:00 PM
Just thought I would add this on the end.

Facts about apple pips:

http://www.snopes.com/food/warnings/apples.asp

Caz

elve
08-04-2005, 07:14 AM
Does anyone know if bindweed is poisonous? The list on the 'dandelion leaves' thread says they are - but I didn't think so? :?

Thanks!

Edana, Benji and Pepper :love:

bunnyhuggger
08-04-2005, 07:49 AM
Louise said:-According to Virginia Richardson in Rabbit Lopeadia BINDWEED is safe to feed. I feed it to my Rabbit's two/three tme's a week and I have done for the past few months with no probs.

Lynda said:-
According to Virginia Richardson MRCVS (Rabbit Nutrition book), Bindweed/Convolvulus is listed under the most poisonous plants on page 38.


Coincidentally I bought the Rabbitlopaedia today and I've checked it does say bindwind is OK to feed whereas the rabbit nutrition book by the same author says that its poisonous. Confusing or what. The rabbitlopaedia also says not to feed cabbage as too much has been found to cause goitre in rabbits.

This is what was found previously re bindweed. The choice is yours :wink: :D

elve
08-04-2005, 11:56 AM
:lol: thanks for telling me that - I skipped a few pages!

I guess it's best to be too cautious - lack of bindweed in their diet is not going to cause my bunnies distress - and I can find safer alternatives (plantain for one)...

Just because your bunny doesn't lay down and die 5 mins after eating something doesn't mean it's not poisonous - a plant is classed as 'poisonous' if it irritates the throat or causes stomach ache, whereas some poisons accumulate in the liver over time, eventually causing serious illness.

The trouble with the 'poisonous plants' lists I've found online is that some are written for cats, some for birds, some for horses, reptiles, etc - sheep can safely eat strychnine - and is it guinea pigs that can eat arsenic?? Whatever - poisons are species specific - and so lists are confusing if they're written for different species of animals than your own.
It gets even more confusing when someone writes a book on rabbits and uses all the references for plants that poison reptiles...

I would rather play safe - I'm sticking to what I KNOW is OK for my boys to eat...errm - would that include cabbage now or not?? :roll:


Edana, Benji and Pepper :love:

Diddeen
09-05-2005, 03:46 PM
http://earthhome.tripod.com/rabsafe.html
this site has a great list of safe and unsafe food/flower/twigs/plants on it.

bunnyhuggger
09-05-2005, 03:49 PM
yeah I thought so as well, it's on page 2 :lol:

Diddeen
09-05-2005, 04:06 PM
ooh doh! :oops:

charmaine
09-05-2005, 10:24 PM
can any one tell me if holly hock is poisoness or not cant find any where :(

bunnyhuggger
09-05-2005, 11:03 PM
on page 2 :wink:

charmaine
09-05-2005, 11:09 PM
never been able to see past the end of my nose :oops: thanx :lol:

bunnyhuggger
09-05-2005, 11:10 PM
:lol:

Paul&Carla
16-07-2005, 12:58 AM
Thumper and Woolly both tuck into Geranium petals - dont tend to eat the stalks. I presume this is okay? Thumper also likes to do a good job on pruning the roses (petals & stems)!!! They have also recently taken a liking to the flowers on Red Hot Pokers. They both like dried Cheery Tree leaves especially Thumper (apparently Cherry wood is highly toxic to buns!). As for Clematis I wish someone would tell Woolly its not good for him!

For breakfast they have 1 - 2 carrots from the fridge. Two issues here 1. the sugar content mentioned aboveand 2. they are served straight from the fridge (another site said they should only be fed veggies at room temp).

Is this a case of humans as usual being more stupid than animals and they actually know whats good or bad for them?

Help!!! :?