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cpayne
17-05-2015, 04:26 PM
It was lovely meeting two RUers at the talk and hopefully they will add anything I've forgotten. The main things I got out of it are:

1. Vets are under subscribing metacam and that leads to a lot of gut statis or can help rabbits out of gut statis. Mark has helped hundreds of rabbits just by putting their metacam dosage up so please don't think you are going to overdose. As an example Doughnut can have 0.5ml three times a day and she is 1.2kg. He gives talks to vets and said it's one of the main issues he sees when people have come to him after being treated elsewhere.

A study of rabbits was done after being spayed or neuteured, some were given no metacam others were given high dosage. Students observed them and found hardly any differences in their behaviour as they hide pain so well. Never go home after a spay without metacam and if your rabbit is going into statis then you should give it metacam if you have it on hand and then syringe feed it. Don't just syringe feed it water, add a bit of critical care in or something to add a bit of taste. In America they do not subscribe any metrocloprimide or drugs for statis, they just feed them. Mark was saying about getting food into the rabbit and they feed them 24-40ml 4 times a day, that's what you should be aiming for. You shouldn't worry about there being a blockage as if a rabbit has a blockage it will become very unwell suddenly not have reduced fecal etc.

He gives intravenous metacloprimide, cisapride, some form of infracol to disperse the bubbles and put them on an IV drip or SC depending on how bad they are. They also syringe feed liquid and food.

2. Get your combined vaccination done 10-11 months. The vaccine seems to not be so effective after 11 months and he's seen cases of myxi. In 4 of the case one died.

3. For sore hock bandage the feet. This is the only way they will get better, vetbeds, fleeces are fine but the feet need to be bandaged in order to recover and also make sure they have metacam to take the pain away.

4. There's no point in giving surgery to rabbits if you're not going to get a lot of post surgery pain relief. A lot of rabbits have surgery for one thing but because they aren't given adequate pain relief they go into statis and die.

The main reasons rabbits go into statis is pain, stress and disease. Normally all three. The first thing to do at home is give metacam if you have any or start syringe feeding to get the stomach going.

Mark doesn't recommend ranitidine as it reduces the acidity in the stomach too much. He said you should never leave a rabbit for a day that hasn't eaten or drunk anything.

5. The sign of needing dental treatment is salivating but he said although you can examine rabbits teeth when they are awake the best thing to do examine is under GA as the spurs at the back are hidden by their tongue, so could be rubbing an ulcer on it but you wouldn't get to see that when they are awake.

It was so interesting and he showed two videos on how to get blood from a rabbit. He said blood tests are always good to do on a sick rabbit and also a radiography. Basically you need to find out what the underlying problem is and treat the statis but if surgery is needed the primary cause then you need to make sure you get pain relief after the surgery otherwise the statis will be back straight away.

I hope all this makes sense. He said a lot more so any questions feel free and I'll or someone else who went hopefully can answer it.

Liz47
17-05-2015, 04:35 PM
Very interesting, thank you for posting :)

Fellie
17-05-2015, 05:01 PM
I think you said it all [emoji2] ...It really was very interesting and was great to meet other RU'ers. It certainly made things so much clearer about stasis.
Hopefully Mark will be giving more talks in the future.. could have listened for hours[emoji2]

Elena
17-05-2015, 05:02 PM
Wow at the vaccination bit. Must remember to change my reminder in my diary, I think that means mine will be due theirs soon. Thank you for typing that out for us :) xx

cpayne
17-05-2015, 05:04 PM
You're welcome. Shame you missed it. He did say he would maybe give more talks. He touched on diseases which was interesting, like Fellie I could have listened for hours.

I'm going in June for Doughnut to get her vaccines and nail trim and going to try and meet up with Fellie, when are yours due, we could let the bunnies meet each other :)

Sarahbun
17-05-2015, 05:36 PM
Thank you for posting this, very useful:D

ImoT
17-05-2015, 05:59 PM
Thank you for posting this. Very interesting about the vaccine!

cpayne
17-05-2015, 08:34 PM
I hope it helps a few people. It did worry me that the rabbits didn't act any different when they didn't get pain relief after a spay when you know how much pain they must be in. I was lucky and had lots of pain relief for Doughnut. Mark really did stress the need for more vets to up the dosage of metacam after surgery too and for rabbits to have post surgery pain relief. I know sometimes on here people have given a small amount of metacam and said their rabbit seems in pain and still isn't eating so hopefully they will now question the vet if it's enough. I'm obviously not encouraging people to overdose!!

Jack's-Jane
17-05-2015, 08:42 PM
Thank you for updating us :)

I wish all Vets realised just how important adequate pain relief is for Rabbits. Some of the situations regarding lack of pain relief we see mentioned on here really are :shock: :cry:

cpayne
17-05-2015, 08:47 PM
Thank you for updating us :)

I wish all Vets realised just how important adequate pain relief is for Rabbits. Some of the situations regarding lack of pain relief we see mentioned on here really are :shock: :cry:

I know that's why I'm trying to emphasise it as Mark did. I think vets are still subscribing under the old measures of 0.2ml which probably doesn't even touch the pain! Doughnut is only little at 1.2kg and I'm sure most rabbits are bigger than her so hopefully people will realise that if she can have 0.5ml three times a day they can give their rabbit more if they are on a really low dose. He also said to give metacam straight away if you notice they are not eating and going into gut statis. The videos were really interesting, it's nice to see what happens to your rabbit once it's passed to the experts.

Jack's-Jane
17-05-2015, 08:55 PM
I know that's why I'm trying to emphasise it as Mark did. I think vets are still subscribing under the old measures of 0.2ml which probably doesn't even touch the pain! Doughnut is only little at 1.2kg and I'm sure most rabbits are bigger than her so hopefully people will realise that if she can have 0.5ml three times a day they can give their rabbit more if they are on a really low dose. He also said to give metacam straight away if you notice they are not eating and going into gut statis. The videos were really interesting, it's nice to see what happens to your rabbit once it's passed to the experts.

Before finding C I went to a Vet who would only prescribe Metacam to be given once every THREE DAYS !! When I questioned this (well, OK, when I argued with her) she said if I wanted to kill my Rabbit by giving Metacam daily that was up to me :shock:

Mind you, she also told me vaccinating against VHD was a waste of time and money as 'VHD is almost impossible to transmit' :shock:

And I once took a bonded pair in as one needed a Dental. She operated on the wrong Rabbit !!

At that point I took my custom elsewhere.

cpayne
17-05-2015, 09:00 PM
Before finding C I went to a Vet who would only prescribe Metacam to be given once every THREE DAYS !! When I questioned this (well, OK, when I argued with her) she said if I wanted to kill my Rabbit by giving Metacam daily that was up to me :shock:

Mind you, she also told me vaccinating against VHD was a waste of time and money as 'VHD is almost impossible to transmit' :shock:

And I once took a bonded pair in as one needed a Dental. She operated on the wrong Rabbit !!

At that point I took my custom elsewhere.

Wow that is really scary. Surprised she didn't operate on you for the dental, at least she choose another rabbit :)

She obviously thought metacam lasted a long time rather than 12 hours. When you know more than your vet it's certainly time to go elsewhere.

MightyMax
17-05-2015, 09:16 PM
CPayne thank you so much for posting all this! It sounds to have been a really interesting evening.

I was surprised to note that he feels the vaccination period is 11 months since the manufacturers would have tested the vaccine for 12 months - much better to err on the safe side :thumb:

dumblepaws
17-05-2015, 09:38 PM
Oooh interesting

Will definitely start vaccinating every 11 months

The pain relief thing is interesting too - I definitely agree bunnies should be prescribed pain relief in more cases and more consistently than they currently are, and that they have a faster metabolism so when they are prescribed it need more frequent doses, but Frances Harcourt-Brown disagreed with giving them higher doses/the maximum they could tolerate - from a rationale of humans 'can' take say 20 ibruprofen without dying, but only take 2, because 2 is enough. So she was advocating try a standard dose and if the bunny still shows signs of pain, up it, rather than dose them straight up with the max.

Also I would still not ever syringe feed until a vet had ruled out a blockage and told me it was ok

I agree re blood tests though - think they are a good test for bunnies and could be done more

cpayne
17-05-2015, 09:43 PM
CPayne thank you so much for posting all this! It sounds to have been a really interesting evening.

I was surprised to note that he feels the vaccination period is 11 months since the manufacturers would have tested the vaccine for 12 months - much better to err on the safe side :thumb:

He said the myxi cases he saw when they had been vaccined were in the last month of vaccination, I know there is a thread on here where someone's rabbit had myxi in the 11th month.

bunslave
17-05-2015, 09:45 PM
Thank you for the feedback :D
Luckily Aiden does prescribe high doses of metacam so him and Mark must be in agreement :wave:

cpayne
17-05-2015, 09:54 PM
Oooh interesting

Will definitely start vaccinating every 11 months

The pain relief thing is interesting too - I definitely agree bunnies should be prescribed pain relief in more cases and more consistently than they currently are, and that they have a faster metabolism so when they are prescribed it need more frequent doses, but Frances Harcourt-Brown disagreed with giving them higher doses/the maximum they could tolerate - from a rationale of humans 'can' take say 20 ibruprofen without dying, but only take 2, because 2 is enough. So she was advocating try a standard dose and if the bunny still shows signs of pain, up it, rather than dose them straight up with the max.

Also I would still not ever syringe feed until a vet had ruled out a blockage and told me it was ok

I agree re blood tests though - think they are a good test for bunnies and could be done more

Sorry I maybe didn't put it quite right. Mark was giving instances where a rabbit came in with a broken leg and was on a low dose and he was saying after surgery to give higher dosages and after being spayed. He was also giving examples that you can't tell if a rabbit is in pain like the study the students carried out. Frequent doses he certainly advocates. I think the standard dose has been upped as like you say rabbits have a faster metabolism and they go through them quicker.

He was saying you have different symptoms with a blockage, the rabbit is very unwell more suddenly as Happyhopper asked about that. She could probably give you a better answer.

HappyHop
18-05-2015, 02:07 PM
Hi
yes I asked about the syringe feeding when you are unsure of whether it is a blockage or not.
With a blockage a rabbit will present itself in a very different way that perhaps a rabbit who may need a dental or other illness. It will appear a lot more sick than other illness and in his words "you would be able to tell the difference" in terms of how the rabbit is presenting itself and you would not hesitate to take it to the vets. He was perhaps referring to owners who knew their bunnies very well and monitored input/output.

It was a very good talk, I think cpayne covered all the main points brilliantly.
It was lovely to meet 2 other RUers :)

Bunny Buddy
18-05-2015, 02:16 PM
Hi
yes I asked about the syringe feeding when you are unsure of whether it is a blockage or not.
With a blockage a rabbit will present itself in a very different way that perhaps a rabbit who may need a dental or other illness. It will appear a lot more sick than other illness and in his words "you would be able to tell the difference" in terms of how the rabbit is presenting itself and you would not hesitate to take it to the vets. He was perhaps referring to owners who knew their bunnies very well and monitored input/output.

It was a very good talk, I think cpayne covered all the main points brilliantly.
It was lovely to meet 2 other RUers :)

I've had 3 who were 'surgical' regarding blockages. Little Dot was the only one that I was extremely concerned about. Elijah didn't reach critical point until nearly 24 hours after he was admitted (interestingly he blew up like a balloon after he was syringe fed at the vets, they decided to take this action given how long it was since he'd eaten).

Gracie was the most recent, there was no way I'd have known from her demeanour that it wasn't 'just another stasis episode' (it was the first time for her having a not eating episode). I don't think syringe feeding without a vet checking for blockages first is something I will ever feel confident to do.

Elena
18-05-2015, 02:42 PM
Mine were due right at the start of August so i'll probably take them sometime in June, got a couple of photo jobs at the start of the month so probably end of June.

Pets mum
18-05-2015, 02:59 PM
Thank you for sharing this info, especially about pain relief. I feel awful because my girl was spayed before I joined RU, so I was a complete novice, and trusted the vet entirely. She was given pain relief after the op, but wasn't given anything to take at home, she must have been in so much pain, poor baby. I know diffently now, and would insist every time, fortunately she made a quick recovery and didn't go into stasis. We live and learn on here don't we ?

cpayne
18-05-2015, 03:03 PM
Thank you for sharing this info, especially about pain relief. I feel awful because my girl was spayed before I joined RU, so I was a complete novice, and trusted the vet entirely. She was given pain relief after the op, but wasn't given anything to take at home, she must have been in so much pain, poor baby. I know diffently now, and would insist every time, fortunately she made a quick recovery and didn't go into stasis. We live and learn on here don't we ?

We certainly do. Don't be hard on yourself, I was just lucky they gave me lots with Doughnut otherwise I would have just taken what they gave and assumed it was right. Hopefully vets are all being taught that they need pain relief after a spay!

Shrinkie
18-05-2015, 03:26 PM
Waw. Some very interesting points and information I didn't realise, definitely invaluable information thank you for sharing

Hugo's There
18-05-2015, 03:43 PM
I know that's why I'm trying to emphasise it as Mark did. I think vets are still subscribing under the old measures of 0.2ml which probably doesn't even touch the pain! Doughnut is only little at 1.2kg and I'm sure most rabbits are bigger than her so hopefully people will realise that if she can have 0.5ml three times a day they can give their rabbit more if they are on a really low dose. He also said to give metacam straight away if you notice they are not eating and going into gut statis. The videos were really interesting, it's nice to see what happens to your rabbit once it's passed to the experts.

But how do you know if they are going into the start of stasis or whether its something completely different starting inc kidney problems? I would have thought it was only OK to give metacam if you know your rabbit has a history of stasis and that metacam will nip it in the bud so to speak?

Hugo's There
18-05-2015, 03:49 PM
I know that's why I'm trying to emphasise it as Mark did. I think vets are still subscribing under the old measures of 0.2ml which probably doesn't even touch the pain! Doughnut is only little at 1.2kg and I'm sure most rabbits are bigger than her so hopefully people will realise that if she can have 0.5ml three times a day they can give their rabbit more if they are on a really low dose. He also said to give metacam straight away if you notice they are not eating and going into gut statis. The videos were really interesting, it's nice to see what happens to your rabbit once it's passed to the experts.

But how do you know if they are going into the start of stasis or whether its something completely different starting inc kidney problems? I would have thought it was only OK to give metacam if you know your rabbit has a history of stasis and that metacam will nip it in the bud so to speak?

cpayne
18-05-2015, 03:59 PM
But how do you know if they are going into the start of stasis or whether its something completely different starting inc kidney problems? I would have thought it was only OK to give metacam if you know your rabbit has a history of stasis and that metacam will nip it in the bud so to speak?

You don't but Mark was saying if you have metacam in the house and the rabbit isn't eating, it's poops are getting really small and few to give it pain relief and syringe feed and it may save a trip to see him. Obviously if the rabbit doesn't perk up then to take it to a vet. He just meant you can maybe help it out of the onset of it, if it is statis. He also said that in his opinion rabbits should be hospitalised as they need that intensive care treatment if they get statis and can be linked up to IVs, given injections of metaclop, which is better than giving orally etc. I know I've only ever got Doughnut back when she's back to normal and never been sent home to syringe feed her myself.

Fellie
18-05-2015, 04:30 PM
I did specifically ask Mark about giving Metacam if say I was to wake up to a bun in stasis and he said yes - if I've got it, give it. And critical care - or whatever food you can tempt the bun with.

I have often felt so helpless seeing a bun in pain and not being able to do anything until I can get it to the vets - and I will in future give pain relief. And take the bun to the vets for further investigation to make sure there was no underlying disease/issues causing pain etc.

The 3 main causes of stasis are PAIN, STRESS, DISEASE.

As Mark said - and it is logical - if you can treat the pain - the stress levels drop - and then you can tackle the disease once you have those under control. Obviously there are other things apart from disease that can cause stress - a change in weather for example, or getting a massive fright. But again - the main thing is to control the pain - and allow the animals to recover from the stress without pain adding to it.

bunny momma
18-05-2015, 04:33 PM
That is good information.
I live in NY state in USA and my vet told me years ago that the most important thing in treating stasis is pain relief and hand feeding. However, in recent years, he is telling me that higher doses of Medicam, although fine for a few days, can damage the kidneys if given for longer periods. We do 2X per day Medicam even though some studies show it lasts closer to 24 hours.
Mark is right that some vets in the USA do not prescribe Metrocloprimide. My own vet tells me there is a question if Metrocloprimide actually helps in rabbits. In my own experience I believe the injectible form does help, so my vet gives me a script to get filled at my pharmacy.
Funny storry, once when I had an injectible Metrocloprimide script filled at my pharmacy I forget to get a script for syringes (or get them at the vets). The pharmacy was able to give me 10 syringes without a script but I had to sign paperwork and was given handouts on bloodborn pathogens, safe sex, etc. The pharmacy did not seem to care it was prescribed for my bunny who had a hard time reading the handouts.

MightyMax
18-05-2015, 04:36 PM
As Mark said - and it is logical - if you can treat the pain - the stress levels drop - and then you can tackle the disease once you have those under control. Obviously there are other things apart from disease that can cause stress - a change in weather for example, or getting a massive fright. But again - the main thing is to control the pain - and allow the animals to recover from the stress without pain adding to it.

Really good advice!

I also start with Infacol as well as the Metacam ... It very often resolves things before I get to the vet's surgery

cpayne
18-05-2015, 04:39 PM
Really good advice!

I also start with Infacol as well as the Metacam ... It very often resolves things before I get to the vet's surgery

Yes he gives infracol or something similar too. Thanks Fellie, you explained it far better than me!

cpayne
18-05-2015, 04:44 PM
That is good information.
I live in NY state in USA and my vet told me years ago that the most important thing in treating stasis is pain relief and hand feeding. However, in recent years, he is telling me that higher doses of Medicam, although fine for a few days, can damage the kidneys if given for longer periods. We do 2X per day Medicam even though some studies show it lasts closer to 24 hours.
Mark is right that some vets in the USA do not prescribe Metrocloprimide. My own vet tells me there is a question if Metrocloprimide actually helps in rabbits. In my own experience I believe the injectible form does help, so my vet gives me a script to get filled at my pharmacy.
Funny storry, once when I had an injectible Metrocloprimide script filled at my pharmacy I forget to get a script for syringes (or get them at the vets). The pharmacy was able to give me 10 syringes without a script but I had to sign paperwork and was given handouts on bloodborn pathogens, safe sex, etc. The pharmacy did not seem to care it was prescribed for my bunny who had a hard time reading the handouts.

Metacam is also recommended here to be given twice a day due the the rabbits metabolic rate.

Mark said he thought the metrocloprimide injected helped and that's one of the reasons why he thinks rabbits should be hospitalised as they can do that.

It's interesting to see how different countries treat it.

Mark hasn't said about the kidneys but I know in my experience Doughnut has been on high dosage for a few days to a week and then we start dropping it down. I hope no one is thinking he advocates high dosages all the time as that's not the case!

Hugo's There
18-05-2015, 04:59 PM
I always give infacol but not metacam if I suspect stasis. If no improvement in an hour then we go to the vet. I guess we are lucky that our vet is at the end of our road so we can have a rabbit on the consult table within 10-15 minutes of the initial phone call :)

HappyHop
18-05-2015, 06:45 PM
To put what cpayne and feelie have already said into context....
Mark was not saying don't go to the vets and treat at home he was saying that stasis can be caused by several factors and sometimes by giving metacam and syringe feeidng you may prevent a vet visit. He was not saying don't go and see him. If they pick up and start eating after this you can say to yourself ok this may have been due to such and such (ie the builders are in and its causing the rabbit to stress. Also if its late at night and you are not able to get to a vets.
He was also perhaps talking about those owners who know their rabbits extremely well and are confident to spot other signs in conjunction with the stopping eating.
We are only passing on what was said at the talk. if he does another one I might ask if i can record it and then transcribe it

bunny momma
19-05-2015, 12:38 AM
Metacam is also recommended here to be given twice a day due the the rabbits metabolic rate.

Mark said he thought the metrocloprimide injected helped and that's one of the reasons why he thinks rabbits should be hospitalised as they can do that.

It's interesting to see how different countries treat it.

Mark hasn't said about the kidneys but I know in my experience Doughnut has been on high dosage for a few days to a week and then we start dropping it down. I hope no one is thinking he advocates high dosages all the time as that's not the case!

My vet may be more concerned about kidney issues because I was treating bunnies that were over 10 years old. Even so, he never objected to be giving them a higher dosage for a short term. He tells me narcotic pain relievers will sometimes slow the gut and that is not good either, so it is better to use a higher dosage of Medicam than a narcotic for most cases of stasis. We are in agreement that giving adequate pain management to get the bunny moving and eating is very important.

I tried the Metrocloprimide pills, and they did not seem to work the same as the injectible (which I was not able to get at the time due to production issues). Thankfully, I can get the injectible again. It is not recommended if a complete obstruction is suspected (not common), so that is why it should not be given arbitrarly. I knew what helped when my bunny had a prior episode of stasis, and before we went to the vet I would start treatment. It is good to have options late at night when the emergency vet is 45 minutes away and you do not want to stress the bunny more (or weather is not good for night driving).

cpayne
19-05-2015, 09:36 AM
Thats interesting, I've never heard of the pills. Doughnut's on the metroclop syrup, but he said giving the injection is far more effective than giving orally.

I agree, I would much rather Doughnut had a high dosage and knew she was pain free than give her a smaller dose and she seems ok but is hiding the pain. From the study they did on spayed rabbits it just shows how good they are at hiding it. I know doughnut really well and what to look for but I am now under the impression that by the time I notice she is uncomfortable/in pain, she is probably in a lot more pain then I realise. So going in with a high dose and then lowering it makes sense to me and if it gets her eating again then that's great.

HappyHop
19-05-2015, 09:38 AM
Every bunny is different and mark was talking about a general rule of thumb.
Regarding the metacam as cpayne and fellie said a lot of non rabbit specialist vets are not aware of the parameters that metacam can be given and in general are giving too low a dose. It would be the equivalent of us taking a quarter of a paracetamol instead of two to treat a headache -maybe not those doses but you get the idea :)

MightyMax
19-05-2015, 12:47 PM
Thats interesting, I've never heard of the pills. Doughnut's on the metroclop syrup, but he said giving the injection is far more effective than giving orally.

I agree, I would much rather Doughnut had a high dosage and knew she was pain free than give her a smaller dose and she seems ok but is hiding the pain. From the study they did on spayed rabbits it just shows how good they are at hiding it. I know doughnut really well and what to look for but I am now under the impression that by the time I notice she is uncomfortable/in pain, she is probably in a lot more pain then I realise. So going in with a high dose and then lowering it makes sense to me and if it gets her eating again then that's great.

For stasis, a high dose of Metacam is only for a very short period of time. I would think it would cause minimal if any damage unless taken long term.

lenslady
19-05-2015, 05:38 PM
What a great read, thanks for posting! As someone new to Rabbit ownership this is a goldmine of information. xx

bunny momma
19-05-2015, 10:24 PM
Thats interesting, I've never heard of the pills. Doughnut's on the metroclop syrup, but he said giving the injection is far more effective than giving orally.

I agree, I would much rather Doughnut had a high dosage and knew she was pain free than give her a smaller dose and she seems ok but is hiding the pain. From the study they did on spayed rabbits it just shows how good they are at hiding it. I know doughnut really well and what to look for but I am now under the impression that by the time I notice she is uncomfortable/in pain, she is probably in a lot more pain then I realise. So going in with a high dose and then lowering it makes sense to me and if it gets her eating again then that's great.

We may be an ocean apart, but we think alike. Thank you so much for sharing Mark's remarks.

cpayne
26-05-2015, 01:55 PM
What a great read, thanks for posting! As someone new to Rabbit ownership this is a goldmine of information. xx

Thank you. I'm going to see Mark next week as Doughnut had her vaccines 11 months ago so going early as instructed. I'm going to ask him about worming rabbits as I know everyone has different views on whether it's worth it or not. I personally don't bother but may change my mind!

MightyMax
26-05-2015, 02:18 PM
Thank you. I'm going to see Mark next week as Doughnut had her vaccines 11 months ago so going early as instructed. I'm going to ask him about worming rabbits as I know everyone has different views on whether it's worth it or not. I personally don't bother but may change my mind!

Just as a matter of interest, not to change your mind or anything, I read recently from MSD on the vaccine that it's efficacy was actually tested at 13 months and was found to be still strong. All the rabbits exposed to the virus, having been vaccinated 13 months earlier, were protected.

Has Mark seen many incidences of myxi or vhd before the 12 months? (sorry you may have mentioned his reasoning before - I just wondered how prevalent it was and whether we should all be doing the vaccine at 11 months?)

cpayne
26-05-2015, 02:22 PM
Yes he has. He had 4 cases this year of rabbits with myxi who had been vaccinated. They were in their 11th month of the vaccine. 3 survived, 1 died. One person on here was one of them who took their rabbit to Mark after being vaccinated. He called the manufacturers to let them know that vaccinated rabbits were getting it. That's why he said to get it done in month 10-11 as all rabbits were due for their vaccine a few weeks later.

I'll see if I can see the thread but can't remember who posted it.

MightyMax
26-05-2015, 02:26 PM
Yes he has. He had 4 cases this year of rabbits with myxi who had been vaccinated. They were in their 11th month of the vaccine. 3 survived, 1 died. One person on here was one of them who took their rabbit to Mark after being vaccinated. He called the manufacturers to let them know that vaccinated rabbits were getting it. That's why he said to get it done in month 10-11 as all rabbits were due for their vaccine a few weeks later.

I'll see if I can see the thread but can't remember who posted it.

Thank you :D

I remember it was the myxi component that was suggested to be done every six months in the past, as extra protection. Of course now they would get a double dose of the VHD vaccine, which is the one some of my rabbits had a problem with ..... It's difficult, isn't it?

cpayne
26-05-2015, 02:30 PM
http://forums.rabbitrehome.org.uk/showthread.php?431672-It-s-myxi-again-(-UPDATE-2nd-nov&highlight=myxi

Here's the link

MightyMax
26-05-2015, 02:32 PM
http://forums.rabbitrehome.org.uk/showthread.php?431672-It-s-myxi-again-(-UPDATE-2nd-nov&highlight=myxi

Here's the link

Thank you :thumb:

cpayne
15-06-2015, 01:59 PM
Just to add I asked Mark about worming rabbits when I saw him, he doesn't think it's necessary.

HappyHop
15-06-2015, 02:17 PM
Thanks great to know
Thank you

mini lop1
15-06-2015, 09:03 PM
its good they mentioned the teeth and spurs right at back that cant be seen without a GA as that's what my vet said while back

MightyMax
15-06-2015, 10:29 PM
Just to add I asked Mark about worming rabbits when I saw him, he doesn't think it's necessary.

Thank you for letting us know.