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Liamtwyford
28-12-2014, 06:36 PM
Hi I have no knowledge on how to look after a rabbit, I want to buy one and look after one I want to be able to keep my rabbit as a house pet and need to know what I need for the rabbit I.e. Types of food, a cozy bed, and what I need to keep my rabbit safe and happy . Note it will not be kept in a hutch in a room is more preferable please can someone tell me what I need.

clutterydrawer
28-12-2014, 06:50 PM
Try here:

http://www.rabbitrehome.org.uk/rabbitcare.asp


Hope this helps!

bunnytoes
28-12-2014, 07:28 PM
It is a goid idea to have a small hutch, cage or hidey house available for the rabbit to get away and hide if she /he wants to. My rabbit Julie lived in the kitchen but had a small cage filled with hay to burrow in and a large storage box with a lid and cave cut out to enter. Her litter bix was kept in there for privacy. You will need lots of hay and greens, food and water bowls and toys for chewing and playing. Julie loved balls to roll especially treat balls. I never locked the cage. The kitchen was rabbit proofed and she was alowed to play in the rest of the house suppervised.

benjiboom
28-12-2014, 07:33 PM
I started off with Benji in a cage that was very large but left open all the time so he could decide when he wanted to come out, in the end, 6 months later, we no longer needed the cage because Benji had decided he would rather live under the dining room table;):lol:

Tamsin
28-12-2014, 08:39 PM
It sounds like house trained would be important so rather than buying one, I'd go to a rescue and adopt a neutered rabbit(s). Young rabbits pee and poop everywhere until after they are neutered which isn't great indoors.

The Rabbit Welfare Association have lots of good advice for new rabbit owners, their booklet is here: http://rabbitwelfare.co.uk/pdfs/RWAbrochuremaster.pdf

Elena
28-12-2014, 08:42 PM
I started off with Benji in a cage that was very large but left open all the time so he could decide when he wanted to come out, in the end, 6 months later, we no longer needed the cage because Benji had decided he would rather live under the dining room table;):lol:

This, except mine like to live under my bed :lol:

I would recommend getting some sturdy underbed storage boxes for litter trays. Tesco do packs of three for about 11.

nessar
29-12-2014, 12:38 AM
The basics of what you need are:
Rabbit food (pellets not muesli)
Good quality hay (you may need to buy this online to get decent quality)
Litter (you can use newspaper and hay, wood pellet litter or paper-based litter, nothing clumping or clay-based)
a heavy ceramic water bowl
a small non-tip style food bowl
a hidey-hole - I use their vet carrier with a blanket inside
a large litter tray (32l+ underbed storage boxes are best)
a hoover that can cope with hay - I'd recommend a Henry
a carrier for vet trips
Everything else is optional really. Tunnels and different levels are great fun for rabbits and willow/wicker balls are generally well-received. If the room is going to be one that you use too, you'll need to block off or protect any cables and remove any house-plants, scented candles or air fresheners as they are a health risk.

I think it's important to recognise that rabbits aren't easy pets to house-train, as you can't train them as such, they don't understand being told off for an action, they don't want to please you like a dog does. Because of this, territorial marking, digging and chewing are all natural behaviours that you can't stop them doing, you just have to try and direct them in a suitable way, e.g. a rabbit with a lot of space and enrichment activities is less likely to be destructive. Most neutered rabbits are fairly easy to litter train (they naturally choose a spot to wee in) but most will still poo around the room, and all house-rabbit owners are familiar with having hay everywhere - they are not pets for house-proud people and you will need to hoover a couple of times a day minimum if you want things tidy. You will have to adapt your home to having a house-rabbit, they are rewarding pets but won't just slot in like a cat or dog would.

A lot of it comes down to the luck of the draw in how good they are in the home- personality plays a big part. Some rabbits just seem to want to destroy everything and wee everywhere and there's nothing you can do about it, whilst some are well behaved. I would recommend looking at rescue rabbits that are already neutered and adult, as this will give you the best chance of being able to choose a well-behaved one. Avoid baby rabbits as destructive behaviour and litter training usually only sets in when they get to puberty/adulthood.

Lisa F
29-12-2014, 02:38 AM
There are some nice ideas for indoor housing here too: http://forums.rabbitrehome.org.uk/showthread.php?304613-Indoor-Housing-Tips-amp-Examples

tammybunny
31-12-2014, 12:55 AM
It sounds like house trained would be important so rather than buying one, I'd go to a rescue and adopt a neutered rabbit(s). Young rabbits pee and poop everywhere until after they are neutered which isn't great indoors.

The Rabbit Welfare Association have lots of good advice for new rabbit owners, their booklet is here: http://rabbitwelfare.co.uk/pdfs/RWAbrochuremaster.pdf

I agree with Tamsin, my bunnies were rescue bunnies (previously house rabbits but later outdoor rabbits). I keep mine as house rabbits and it only took around a week to get them used to using their litter tray (they have never pooped or peed anywhere other than their pen). Also I am lucky with mine that they don't seem to destroy/chew furniture that other bunnies do - I think this is because they are a little older mixed with their personalities (2 and a half) you might be able to find a rescue bunny that is already house/litter trained which you won't get it you buy your rabbit from a pet shop/breeder.