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View Full Version : It's Not Wabbit Wednesday But Lets Talk About Dental Disease in Rabbits :-)



Jack's-Jane
07-06-2014, 02:41 PM
I thought it might be interesting to have a weekly theme of discussion about specific Rabbit issues that many people may come up against if they have pet Rabbits. We 'talked' about Gut Stasis in another thread, so I thought talking about Dental problems would be useful too :)

Do you have a 'Dental' Rabbit ? How did the problem initially present and what does managing the condition involve ?

If you dont have a 'Dental' Rabbit do you do any routine checks of your Rabbit's teeth ? Things like noting abnormal enamel colour (ie yellowed instead of white), uneven wearing of Incisors, lumps along the mandible ?

It would be good to share as much information as possible, there is always something new for us to learn :D

Santa
07-06-2014, 02:48 PM
:wave: Santa was a dental bunny, she had such a tiny squashed face that her molars didn't align properly and she needed regular dentals. I could always tell when she needed a dental because she started eating her food in a different way, she would chew in a mouth open-mouth closed up/down type way, rather than in a grinding side-to-side way. And when grazing she would put the blade of grass in her mouth and then yank her head backwards to break it instead of grinding her teeth sideways.

In spite of it being a chronic problem, she didn't have dentals all that often, maybe 2-3 times a year. My vet used to put her under GA and burr them right back down to just above the gum line. This meant that she was able to reshape them properly and so that they took longer to re-grow and took much longer to get back out of alignment/develop spurs again. There was also one occasion where I could tell she needed a dental but we had been putting it off because she was having a very bad snuffly stage, but eventually had to do it anyway because she had started dropping food - when she was under GA my vet found that she had a spur growing sideways into her cheek, which she had been unable to see during conscious examination.

The main problem for Santa with her dental issues was that the tooth roots were pushing up into her nasal passages, which made her a chronic snuffler. It was the snuffling which caused her far more problems than the teeth themselves, although the two are clearly interlinked...but maybe chronic respiratory disease is a topic for another week ;) Again, the burring the teeth back down to the gum line helps here, as it can't 'undo' the problem, but it can release some of the pressure on the tooth roots slowing down the progress.

ripminnie
07-06-2014, 02:50 PM
Digby is kind of a dental rabbit... but it's the roots of his teeth that are problematic, he doesn't get spurs etc. The roots of his incisors are the wrong shape and they don't grow as they should; they put pressure on his nasal cavity causing weepy eyes and some nasal discharge, which used to make him cough/splutter quite a lot. Bar chewing and digging up roots to chew were one of the signs he displayed. Since being on metacam he has been fine for 18 months, until last week when he started struggling again. Hence his GA this week, which was not exactly routine, but that's another thread...

The vet reduced his lower incisors down to take the pressure off the upper ones.

Vegan_Bunny
07-06-2014, 02:58 PM
Fiver developed spurs on his teeth when she was about 4-5 years old. He has always had an excellent diet, so it's most likely genetic. He can usually go about 8 months between dentals. I know when he needs one because he gets very grumpy, sits on his own a lot more and sometimes drools. He gets regular checkups at the vets to make sure his teeth are ok.

Shadowfax has dental issues. Her teeth don't align properly. She had a dental when she was spayed because she was going off her pellets and other food intermittently. She has so far been ok, but will most likely need another dental at some point. She also gets regular checkups at the vets.

nixndaz
07-06-2014, 03:08 PM
My bunny, George, had his front bottom teeth removed on Thursday. He is doing really well and already eating fine.
I got him in April and he's had to have his teeth clipped every month. Basically, he was dropped off at the pet shop by his last owner because they didn't want the expense of dealing with his teeth. The pet shop owner was taking him monthly too before I rehomed him. I spoke to the vet and we decided it would be better to take them out ad they were going rotten too. Also George was starting to stress more every time he had them clipped. At least now I'll be able to bond him with my other bunnies without having to take them all to the vets every month.

Sent from my LG-D802 using Tapatalk

Fifibutton
07-06-2014, 03:39 PM
My bridge Bun, Bonnie had dental issues that eventually meant she had to be pts.

I first noticed there was something wrong when her dewlap became wet and the fur was gone in some places. Basically she was dribbling because she had developed sharp molar spurs on her back left molars. She was also off her food and hay in particular. Bonnie was 7 and half by the time she developed these issues so it was put down to old age. She started off needing a dental every month and then it became every two weeks and it was obvious the situation was not going to improve. She also began to recover with less vigour and her bad days outnumbered her good days hence the decision we made.

I have an otoscope at home which I use to check the bunnies if they are displaying any typical symptoms. I don't use it otherwise because they all hate having it put in their mouths. But they are checked daily for dribbling, weepy eyes, being off food, tooth grinding and so on.

It was a shame because she was an otherwise healthy bunny, she used to be a great hay eater and had a very happy life. Had that not happened she may have lived another 2 years or so.

Jack's-Jane
07-06-2014, 03:46 PM
I remember a time when many Vets would immediately suggest PTS at the first hint of Dental problems. Sadly it was in my very early days of having Rabbits and I believed what I was told :cry: Of course there are circumstances when PTS becomes the only humane option. But I am talking about a Rabbit with molar spurs :cry:

Fran
07-06-2014, 03:47 PM
Biscuit and Max have recently developed dental issues. With Max the first sign is him mulching his greens so he leaves staining around his mouth, and with Biscuit she gets a mucky bum at times and she eats on one side of her mouth. They're both 5 now and their dental problems have only just started over the last few months.

Jack's-Jane
07-06-2014, 03:50 PM
Biscuit and Max have recently developed dental issues. With Max the first sign is him mulching his greens so he leaves staining around his mouth, and with Biscuit she gets a mucky bum at times and she eats on one side of her mouth. They're both 5 now and their dental problems have only just started over the last few months.

I have certainly seen Dental problems arise in Rabbits aged 7+ who had never had any problems before and who were fed on a good hay based diet. I think it must be that the ageing process plays a part too.

Fran
07-06-2014, 03:56 PM
I have certainly seen Dental problems arise in Rabbits aged 7+ who had never had any problems before and who were fed on a good hay based diet. I think it must be that the ageing process plays a part too.

Yes I've had Biscuit since 16 weeks and Max since he was around 6 months and so they've always had a good diet, I'm really strict so they get no fruit or treats as Biscuit has a fairly sensitive stomach. Assume being lops can also cause dental problems as they age too?

Bunny Buddy
07-06-2014, 04:01 PM
I remember a time when many Vets would immediately suggest PTS at the first hint of Dental problems. Sadly it was in my very early days of having Rabbits and I believed what I was told :cry: Of course there are circumstances when PTS becomes the only humane option. But I am talking about a Rabbit with molar spurs :cry:

My first bunny, Bungee, was one those. I bought her in late July 2004, she needed her first dental in October at which time it was suggested it would be a good opportunity to spay her if it was something I had planned- so I did. In January (ie 12 week intervals) she had molar spurs again and PTS was suggested :shock: She was approximately a year old and otherwise healthy. I'd also (to my mind) shown commitment to her by having her spayed. I'd said why I was booking the appointment (ie dental/not eating) and a nurse was in the consultation room (only time I've ever known that) so I really think they expected to be putting her to sleep ... for the sake of 40 every 3 months :cry::cry::cry: What happens next? Do you just go out and 'replace' them? I'm so glad I realised it wasn't the right thing to do.

Vegan_Bunny
07-06-2014, 04:02 PM
Yes I've had Biscuit since 16 weeks and Max since he was around 6 months and so they've always had a good diet, I'm really strict so they get no fruit or treats as Biscuit has a fairly sensitive stomach. Assume being lops can also cause dental problems as they age too?

Lops tend to be more prone to dental problems, but my Fiver is a dutch X and dutchies are meant to be the "healthiest" breed because they are physiologically closer to the shape of a wildlie. I really think it's just pot luck. :(

Jack's-Jane
07-06-2014, 04:09 PM
My first bunny, Bungee, was one those. I bought her in late July 2004, she needed her first dental in October at which time it was suggested it would be a good opportunity to spay her if it was something I had planned- so I did. In January (ie 12 week intervals) she had molar spurs again and PTS was suggested :shock: She was approximately a year old and otherwise healthy. I'd also (to my mind) shown commitment to her by having her spayed. I'd said why I was booking the appointment (ie dental/not eating) and a nurse was in the consultation room (only time I've ever known that) so I really think they expected to be putting her to sleep ... for the sake of 40 every 3 months :cry::cry::cry: What happens next? Do you just go out and 'replace' them? I'm so glad I realised it wasn't the right thing to do.

I wish I had not believed the Vet :cry: I was told that the Rabbit would be 'suffering all her life'. She was only about 3. The very same Vet also told me that VHD Vaccinations were not necessary as VHD was (according to her) 'very hard to transmit' :? :roll:

I sure have had some learning curves over the years. The worst part being the fact that my 'not knowing any better' cost a Rabbit his/her life :cry:

Jack's-Jane
07-06-2014, 04:11 PM
This is an excellent article on the management of Dental Disease. It is by Marie Kubiak

http://www.manorvets.co.uk/ckfinder/userfiles/files/dental%20dz(1).pdf

Vegan_Bunny
07-06-2014, 04:12 PM
I wish I had not believed the Vet :cry: I was told that the Rabbit would be 'suffering all her life'. She was only about 3. The very same Vet also told me that VHD Vaccinations were not necessary as VHD was (according to her) 'very hard to transmit' :? :roll:

I sure have had some learning curves over the years. The worst part being the fact that my 'not knowing any better' cost a Rabbit his/her life :cry:

You can't think like that. It may have been the right decision at the time. If the vet thought putting a bun down because of dental problems was ok, then I highly doubt that vet would have been able to perform a dental correctly. I think everybody here has had experience of bad vets and there are plenty of people on here who have lost a bun because of them, me included. You can't beat yourself up forever about something that you had no control of at the time.

Bunny Buddy
07-06-2014, 04:17 PM
I wish I had not believed the Vet :cry: I was told that the Rabbit would be 'suffering all her life'. She was only about 3. The very same Vet also told me that VHD Vaccinations were not necessary as VHD was (according to her) 'very hard to transmit' :? :roll:

I sure have had some learning curves over the years. The worst part being the fact that my 'not knowing any better' cost a Rabbit his/her life :cry:

At least I'm lucky enough that the vet did concede that she wouldn't be suffering and that we should give it a go with regular dentals as she seemed to cope well with GA. If you had it put to you that it was for the benefit of the rabbit then the decision was made from a different perspective ie out of consideration for the rabbit. I could so easily, if I'd been taken more off-guard, have agreed to it not weighing it up properly :cry: Ironically I've always thought the vet in question is a really caring man so I think it was just the way things were done, and the value people put on rabbits. I'm horrified when I look back though at the memory that sometimes she was barely eating and it could be a couple of days before she was able to have the dental (surgery list fully booked). She had no pain relief and I kept her going on brown bread etc, syringe feeding was never suggested and I didn't know about it being an option. ... was that really only 10 years ago? :(

JemimaH
07-06-2014, 04:57 PM
Digby is kind of a dental rabbit... but it's the roots of his teeth that are problematic, he doesn't get spurs etc. The roots of his incisors are the wrong shape and they don't grow as they should; they put pressure on his nasal cavity causing weepy eyes and some nasal discharge, which used to make him cough/splutter quite a lot. Bar chewing and digging up roots to chew were one of the signs he displayed. Since being on metacam he has been fine for 18 months, until last week when he started struggling again. Hence his GA this week, which was not exactly routine, but that's another thread...

The vet reduced his lower incisors down to take the pressure off the upper ones.

This is what my Alf is like as well :wave: He's on daily metacam and hasn't had to have a flush for a while (not in 2014 anyway).

Having said that, he went to the vets yesterday because I suspected a problem, he wasn't eating very enthusiastically, and...dental on Monday :roll: Something to do with the lip - lingual? - and it was going down instead of up, or vice versa...basically it was going in the wrong direction, so his bottom teeth are larger than they should be.

tulsi
07-06-2014, 05:32 PM
Mottle (mini lop) has had spurs filed under a g/a and has recently had them rasped (cant have been much fun for him) during his vaccine/check up.

Tessie and Daisy have got ridges on their back molars but no signs of spurs. There must be some lop in their breeding as Daisy's ears go down sometimes, not fully though.

I hope Mottle wont need a g/a again for ages ...

Bess&George
07-06-2014, 05:49 PM
My 3 yo bun Bess stopped eating last year, and it turned out she had tiny spurs on one side that ended up having to be filed under g/a.

That's interesting about lops being more prone to it, Bess is not a lop but a NZ white cross but her ears are one up one down (is there a name for that?) and the spurs appeared on the lop side only.

She's being checked frequently now as the vet thinks the problem is likely to reoccur. :(

Fifibutton
07-06-2014, 06:15 PM
I have certainly seen Dental problems arise in Rabbits aged 7+ who had never had any problems before and who were fed on a good hay based diet. I think it must be that the ageing process plays a part too.

I would agree with this because while I am no expert it is well known that as you age, your body may reabsorb calcium and phosphate from your bones and teeth and deplete them in the process, of these minerals. Naturally this makes the bones and teeth weaker which is why you see so many older people with false teeth or needing hip replacements. I would imagine its the same for all mammals. Certainly when I asked my vet why Bonnie had developed problems when she had previously had no issues nor a genetic or breed based disposition for dental problems, old age was given as the reason. Bonnie was not a lop, her mum was a black straight eared bunny and her dad is half wild half English cross. So straight eared and trim jawline with a decent sized skull.

I knew about lops and Nethies being more prone because a smaller face means there is less space for the teeth to grow and fit in. I have one lop and she will be four later this year so she is starting to approach middle age. So far she has been ok dental wise but she did have a bout of snuffles before she moved indoors. She is fine just now and a great hay eater so I hope she won't experience any issues.

iggyperdyandme
07-06-2014, 06:21 PM
I don't know I you would call Betty a dental bunny but she has elongated tooth roots. We are managing the symptons rather than the cause due to her tiny flat faced head!

Betty has drops for her eye infections (par for the cause) but we have been very lucky so far. Betty had hardly any pellets and treats now and we feed her so much hay which is helping. We tried so many drops and flushing for the eye infections before finding maxi troll. But this isn't a long term option because of the steroids. She is about 2-3 and developed symptons at 1 year (just a few months after she came to us) so is prob genetic.

Having Walter to help with cleaning her eyes is amazing. At present she gets fur clouds from moulting and blocked tear ducts so we are grooming her so much and helping out with cloud removal with boiled water and a cotton bud to the corner of her eye. The clouds must annoy her though because she tolerates their removal!

There are loads of baby lops advertised locally at the moment and I always think they should come with a little 'May get bad teeth and cost you an arm and a leg'. If there was anything we could do I would pay anything I could to help her though.

I would be really interested in knowing how other people manage though and what to expect for the future for Betty? :wave:

iggyperdyandme
07-06-2014, 06:22 PM
That was the longest post! Really great idea for a thread though!! :D

Barn Yard Bunnies
07-06-2014, 07:19 PM
After having rabbits for nearly 14 years and no dental problems I now have two dental bunnies. Mr Bennett who some people maybe aware is a frequent dental bunny and Cutie-pie who has had 3 over the last 3 years. I have lost count with Mr Bennett but it must be in double figures now.

Both present themselves with exactly the same symptoms, they stop eating. They are still bright and alert within themselves, interested in food but won't eat. Over time I can tell when Mr Bennett is leading up to a dental. He starts to chew furniture, door frames and his carpet. He slowly goes off his food. I usually get him to the vets before he stops eating now. Its very stressful with Mr Bennett because he seems to get a combination of problems with his dentals such as mites and mucky bottoms, as he gets run down and he can take a week to recover.

Cutie-pie has her dental and is back to normal within hours and doesn't have any other problems, although occasionally gets wet under the eyes. Its been nearly 18 months since her last dental and she had her teeth checked last week and no sign of spurs. My vet is brave and pops her little finger in there to have a feel, (they won't bite), neither of them have spurs at the moment but it was only 5 weeks since Mr Bennett's dental and the check up, 6 weeks is the shortest between dentals, 5 months is the longest. Tried everything and now I pay 70 for a bale of ORCHARD HAY, which has a high silica content which is meant to help grind down teeth.

Jack's-Jane
07-06-2014, 07:40 PM
Molar spur that has lacerated the tongue

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b27/Jan-bun/Rabbit%20Health%20Etc/Molar_Spur_pic_2.jpg (http://s16.photobucket.com/user/Jan-bun/media/Rabbit%20Health%20Etc/Molar_Spur_pic_2.jpg.html)

Spurs on both upper and lower molars on the Rabbit's left side

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b27/Jan-bun/Rabbit%20Health%20Etc/molar_spurs.jpg (http://s16.photobucket.com/user/Jan-bun/media/Rabbit%20Health%20Etc/molar_spurs.jpg.html)

Hesperus
07-06-2014, 07:43 PM
My experience is very limited, but all I can say is that Harry's first symtpom of dental problems was when he dribbled on my jeans.

katie88
07-06-2014, 08:56 PM
Great thread ideas!

Marbles I believe is in the early stages of being a dental bunny. She had her first dental last october aged 2 and another one in march this year. The first sign if that she goes off her hay slightly. The change is so subtle and the first time I questioned whether to even get her checked. The second time unfortunately she was poorly with other stuff so it was harder to establish the cause but I just 'sensed' that it was her teeth, and it was.

She has always been an excellent hay eater but the vet says she has uneven teeth She will probably always be a dental bunny so I just encourage her to eat as much hay as poss. I've also recently switched to oxboy orchard grass as I read that's good for dental buns. We'll see if it makes a difference.

mini lop1
07-06-2014, 09:51 PM
other hidden illness could also contribute to it sometimes, as with my sox, he kept having GI statis episodes, and needing dentals a lot, then when we found out he had kidney disease, ever since he has been on meds (touch wood) he has not needed a dental since :thumb:

Janey
07-06-2014, 09:54 PM
My bridge bun Poppy was a dental bun.

First presented at about 2 years old, took my awful vets about a week to figure it was her teeth as they said they couldn't see anything (whilst she was awake) :roll:, a week later my poor little emaciated bunny (she was actually emaciated the vet said) had a huge spur filed.

She would stop eating which is how I could tell, she had elongated tooth roots and blocked tear ducts as a result, RU saved her life when somebody suggested she could have depocillin, think I'm going to go back and see who that was. I suggested it to the 'specialist exotic vet' but they wouldn't administer, again RU came to the rescue and suggested my rabbit savvy vet who kept Poppy alive for many years.

In later life she developed awful incisors too which we had to manage, I was convinced and paranoid she would get an abcess but in the end she died rather suddenly, I think due to her heart.

She would never eat hay, she would rather starve and I regularly spent days on end trying to make her eat, she had an awful diet as a result. I do wonder how much pain she was in as she didn't groom a lot either. She had a lot of love though. I'm pretty sure it was caused due to awful breeding, typical pet shop bun with a smooshy face, she was a mini-lop.

I loved that bunny so much, still miss her everyday, she was such a little fighter.

amaeving
07-06-2014, 10:56 PM
Germ is a dental bunny, she first developed an abscess around 4 years ago and since then has had a couple of episodes. She is an angel for her depo inj and lives on metacam and ranitidine. She has now only has one remaining molar on the left and 2 on the right (removed over multiple dentals) but is very very happy living on a readigrass and a equine hay supplement, along with greens. She eats slower than her pal however maintains her weight well and is definitely worth all the GA's, dentals, x-rays and CT she has recieved over the previous years.

Just goes to show you there is a definitie genetic component (she is a small headed mini lop) and has always been on timothy hay/grass since she was 12 weeks of age.

A gratuitous picture of a very cross Germ post abscess surgery:

http://i1310.photobucket.com/albums/s641/amaeving/2013-10-05124535_zps54afc8c0.jpg

Janey
07-06-2014, 11:23 PM
Germ is a dental bunny, she first developed an abscess around 4 years ago and since then has had a couple of episodes. She is an angel for her depo inj and lives on metacam and ranitidine. She has now only has one remaining molar on the left and 2 on the right (removed over multiple dentals) but is very very happy living on a readigrass and a equine hay supplement, along with greens. She eats slower than her pal however maintains her weight well and is definitely worth all the GA's, dentals, x-rays and CT she has recieved over the previous years.

Just goes to show you there is a definitie genetic component (she is a small headed mini lop) and has always been on timothy hay/grass since she was 12 weeks of age.

A gratuitous picture of a very cross Germ post abscess surgery:

http://i1310.photobucket.com/albums/s641/amaeving/2013-10-05124535_zps54afc8c0.jpg

Gorgeous bun.

Mini-lops are my absolute favourite, however I could never have one again due to the risk of dental issues, it causes so much stress.

Jack's-Jane
08-06-2014, 11:58 AM
With regards to Dental treatment, do you feel confident that your Vet has sufficient knowledge/experience ? Or do you sometimes feel that they are somewhat limited in their 'Rabbit specific' knowledge ? Do you feel that they explain things to you enough or do they just say 'your Rabbit needs a Dental'.

What good advice has your Vet given about the best diet for your Rabbit and for the monitoring of chronic Dental problems ?

JemimaH
08-06-2014, 01:14 PM
With regards to Dental treatment, do you feel confident that your Vet has sufficient knowledge/experience ? Or do you sometimes feel that they are somewhat limited in their 'Rabbit specific' knowledge ? Do you feel that they explain things to you enough or do they just say 'your Rabbit needs a Dental'.

What good advice has your Vet given about the best diet for your Rabbit and for the monitoring of chronic Dental problems ?

I'm lucky because my vet is an exotic specialist who is very bunny-savvy. She always explains everything really well and has shown me the x rays on numerous occasions, as well as having shown me Dee's teeth through the 'scope before :D

Jack's-Jane
08-06-2014, 01:36 PM
I'm lucky because my vet is an exotic specialist who is very bunny-savvy. She always explains everything really well and has shown me the x rays on numerous occasions, as well as having shown me Dee's teeth through the 'scope before :D

I think its so helpful when a Vet actually takes time to explain what any treatment involves. It is good to feel able to ask questions.

JemimaH
08-06-2014, 01:39 PM
I think its so helpful when a Vet actually takes time to explain what any treatment involves. It is good to feel able to ask questions.

Oh, definitely. It's also helpful when, despite them being chockablock with appointments/surgery like my vet normally is, they don't rush you in your own appointment and are totally focused on you!

iggyperdyandme
09-06-2014, 08:05 AM
With regards to Dental treatment, do you feel confident that your Vet has sufficient knowledge/experience ? Or do you sometimes feel that they are somewhat limited in their 'Rabbit specific' knowledge ? Do you feel that they explain things to you enough or do they just say 'your Rabbit needs a Dental'.

What good advice has your Vet given about the best diet for your Rabbit and for the monitoring of chronic Dental problems ?

One local vet is quite good at explaining and advice giving but other vets at the same practice said they had about 2 weeks of training in bunny care or don't know much about small animals so we are very careful to only see the one lady.

We had the same problem when we lived in Leicester though. Our vet was great, the locums that started covering 2 days a week weren't so great.

With regard to diet, we were just told more hay and less pellets and greens. I would be really interested to know about advice given to others though?
I know medical advice is rabbit specific but it's helpful to know what other options to ask about? :D

Aly&Poppy<3
09-06-2014, 10:25 AM
5 out of 6 of my rabbits need dentals now :(

Poppy (7) is a mixture of my ignorance towards rabbit care and awful breeding. She hasn't had to have a dental for over a year now though, but she doesn't have that many teeth left.. Her left eye is weepy again so she is going for a check up, might be her teeth, might need her tear ducts flushing again.

Leo (8 ) is probably because he only had soiled on hay to eat for 5 years, his dentals aren't very frequent though. He's got a soggy nose at the moment so he's going back for a dental check and course of baytril.

Kerbie (7) had his first dental (with us anyway) a few weeks ago, the indication was that his poos were starting to go wet.

Donny (3). Maybe it's a lop thing, he's a hay monster but had some spurs that needed doing.

Lola (3), she is having her second dental in 9 days, maybe for the same reason as Donny. She is also a hay monster but since taking her to the vets for their last check up she has slowed down a bit. Grass, veg, forage, she'll eat it no problem but hay intake isn't as good as usual so that's what made me wonder if it was her teeth again. So soon too :(

Charley (2) .. Praying she is fine. She eats hay and everything fine, but has never been a huge hay eater, every vet check has been okay though so maybe she's just a slow eater..!

The vet we see is excellent with rabbits/their issues etc but we need to check to see who is doing the surgeries as Kerbie was done by the co owner and main numpty who seems to know jack **** about small animals despite specialising in them. He was willing to send us home with no metacam and the metacam he gave us was the cat one and a low, pointless dosage.
We avoid him completely after the mess ups he's made with the rabbits and my poor hamster April..

(Hauling 3 rabbits to the vets next week will be fun..!)

Bunny Buddy
09-06-2014, 10:56 AM
With regards to Dental treatment, do you feel confident that your Vet has sufficient knowledge/experience ? Or do you sometimes feel that they are somewhat limited in their 'Rabbit specific' knowledge ? Do you feel that they explain things to you enough or do they just say 'your Rabbit needs a Dental'.

What good advice has your Vet given about the best diet for your Rabbit and for the monitoring of chronic Dental problems ?

Yeah, she gets by ;)

It was interesting to hear FHB telling me in the last couple of weeks that she's seeing a lot less rabbits with non-complex dental problems now ie dental spur type problems compared to about a decade ago and she attributes this to people understanding diet better and feeding lots of fresh good quality hay and not a huge bowl of muesli as would have been the case in the past.

Strangely, with most of my rabbits being lops, I haven't really encountered a huge amount of dental problems with them. From 18 rabbits (15 lops) over 10 years:
Bungee had malocclusion so had regular dentals.
Rudy had one dental 6 weeks after adoption, age 1 now age 7 and no problems since.
Shadow had dental problems but given his liver problems it was down to poor absorbtion of nutrition, I believe.
Erin had a dental abscess but it was most likely down to getting something stuck between her teeth - she has really good teeth otherwise.

So, only really Bungee truly a "dental rabbit".