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View Full Version : Do rabbit rescues make a loss?



Georgeypudding
23-12-2012, 05:51 PM
I was just pondering this, I saw a rabbit up for adoption and the fee is 50 my first thought was "oo thats alot" and then I stopped to think about it!

Say I brought a rabbit from a pet shop, thats probably about 20. Then a combi jab which is around 40, plus neutering on top which varies between 30 and 100 depending on your vet!

So obviously for us it is cheaper to adopt but do rescues make a loss, or does your "rescue discount" if you get it mean you don't?

Jenova
23-12-2012, 05:57 PM
I would imagine they always make a loss.

Alison Marie
23-12-2012, 05:59 PM
I think they would make a loss - think about the costs of neutering and vaccines and food, bedding, medicines ... It's really costly and I don't think 50 is really that much. BUT, you can see why people would be put off by it - they don't think about neutering and stuff before hand. Rabbits are just seen as cheap pets :(

We paid 110 to adopt our dog from the RSPCA which might seem a lot but he's neutered and was vaccinated etc.

Snowy
23-12-2012, 06:09 PM
Yes:wave:

nessar
23-12-2012, 06:38 PM
I would imagine they always make a loss. Even if you assume they have a really cheap vet it is still:

Neuter: 50
Vaccinations: 30
=80 minimum, plus all their food, bedding etc for however long they are there (likely a few months minimum) and any treatment for the health problems they have come in with, or any found at a later date. If they are there longer than a year you've got another round of vaccines too. In reality, they probably pay more for neutering and vaccines, as those costs are just based on the cheapest I've seen.

Georgeypudding
23-12-2012, 06:49 PM
Its really sad that they have to make a loss, lets face it if they asked for more I think some people would be put off :( Even breaking even would be better than nothing

Captain Helen
23-12-2012, 06:49 PM
Yes. I would estimate (very roughly) at least 50 a bun.

Tinsel
23-12-2012, 06:59 PM
I suspect they make a massive loss. As well as neutering/vaccinating etc as a group I would imagine these rabbits are more prone to illnesses/be in need of health care than average, as in many cases it may be these that have caused the owners to give the rabbit up in the first place, eg the discovery that a rabbit will need ongoing dentals etc. Rescues would have to invest a lot in terms of money, time and care in some buns, just to get them to the stage where they're fit and healthy and ready to be adopted. I would imagine the medical bills are huge. :?

Minimallow
23-12-2012, 07:09 PM
Even as a Gerbil rescue who doesn't require vaccinations and neutering (as a rule) I still make a loss - so bunny rescues loss must be far greater in comparison :(

Kavanne
23-12-2012, 07:12 PM
I don't think profit/loss really comes into it with charities?

They have donations and/or assets and they spend the proceeds of these on the animals. It's always going to be 'lossmaking' but that is surely how a charity works?

Georgeypudding
23-12-2012, 07:38 PM
I don't think profit/loss really comes into it with charities?

They have donations and/or assets and they spend the proceeds of these on the animals. It's always going to be 'lossmaking' but that is surely how a charity works?

I was just wondering how home run rescues cope, obviously making a loss isn't great!

bunnymadhouse
23-12-2012, 07:48 PM
yes ...

we pay 43 castrate
53 spay

25 vaccination

we charge 50 adoption fee .

so thats a loss straight away ...

then we worm all the buns when they arrive ...some need mite or flea treatments ..

because we take in a lot of strays we also have other vet bills ...for eg anitibiotics for bite , sctratch wounds ...eye drops for sore eyes etc

then theres food , bedding ,

then other expenses petrol for vet trips , homechecks , ink to print paperwork etc etc .

halfpenny
23-12-2012, 07:49 PM
I don't think profit/loss really comes into it with charities?

They have donations and/or assets and they spend the proceeds of these on the animals. It's always going to be 'lossmaking' but that is surely how a charity works?

Believe me, donations do not even begin to cover the costs of running a rescue.
What do you mean by assets?
We only manage to run by doing without ourselves and sinking more than every spare penny into the sanctuary.

halfpenny
23-12-2012, 07:52 PM
Deleted!

Georgeypudding
23-12-2012, 07:54 PM
yes ...

we pay 43 castrate
53 spay

25 vaccination

we charge 50 adoption fee .

so thats a loss straight away ...

then we worm all the buns when they arrive ...some need mite or flea treatments ..

because we take in a lot of strays we also have other vet bills ...for eg anitibiotics for bite , sctratch wounds ...eye drops for sore eyes etc

then theres food , bedding ,

then other expenses petrol for vet trips , homechecks , ink to print paperwork etc etc .


you don't realise just how much rescues do until its written down infront of you! Do you mind me asking how you manage to keep open?

Lea-Anne
23-12-2012, 07:56 PM
you don't realise just how much rescues do until its written down infront of you! Do you mind me asking how you manage to keep open?

I've wondered this lots too. How can a few car boots etc keep these all your buns ? I only have one who requires constant vet care and the bills are ridiculous. I admire rescues so much.

Kavanne
23-12-2012, 08:20 PM
Believe me, donations do not even begin to cover the costs of running a rescue.
What do you mean by assets?
We only manage to run by doing without ourselves and sinking more than every spare penny into the sanctuary.

Sorry if I offended. Larger charities usually have assets at the bank and they can take interest/income from these rather than spending the capital. Of course, a home run rescue often won't have the chance to do this unless they are left a legacy.

I don't think any charity should make a 'profit'. It's OK to keep surplus funds for future projects but money should have plans, not just sit in the account of the charity or go to paying 'directors' excessive wages (a problem, I feel, certainly with the big big charities)

halfpenny
23-12-2012, 08:30 PM
Sorry if I offended. Larger charities usually have assets at the bank and they can take interest/income from these rather than spending the capital. Of course, a home run rescue often won't have the chance to do this unless they are left a legacy.

I don't think any charity should make a 'profit'. It's OK to keep surplus funds for future projects but money should have plans, not just sit in the account of the charity or go to paying 'directors' excessive wages (a problem, I feel, certainly with the big big charities)

But without out 'assets' and legacies, a rescue cannot survive beyond its original trustees. My dream for Halfpenny Farm is for it to become an individual entity, beyond Mike and I, but that will not happen until it either has regular supporters and manages to build up some sort of security to cover 'rainy days'. If Halfpenny Farm is to survive after us, it must also take in enough money to pay some staff. Most rescues will never reach this and only survive by supporting it with their own money.
I agree that larger rescues should put the money towards the animals rather than pay for 'managers', head offices and lots of advertising, but can understand a cushion being kept for when and if donations drop.

Crunchie
23-12-2012, 08:33 PM
I can't really imagine how any of the rescues that use this forum could possibly be running at anything other than a loss unless they got a massive regular donation from somewhere.

Georgeypudding
23-12-2012, 09:18 PM
Sorry if I offended. Larger charities usually have assets at the bank and they can take interest/income from these rather than spending the capital. Of course, a home run rescue often won't have the chance to do this unless they are left a legacy.

I don't think any charity should make a 'profit'. It's OK to keep surplus funds for future projects but money should have plans, not just sit in the account of the charity or go to paying 'directors' excessive wages (a problem, I feel, certainly with the big big charities)

when I say profit I mean enough to cover the costs of the rabbit, and a little extra to go into the housing fund or the vets fund or whatever may be needed!

catherine09
23-12-2012, 09:23 PM
I think some rescues help fund the rescuing my doing boarding also..but even them I doubt they're profitable...

I don't think profit comes into it when you're pro welfare, most rescues main aim will be to promote welfare, rehome and educate and just try and cover costs as best they can

martlou
23-12-2012, 09:25 PM
I've had conversations with several people about this, the ones who exclaim '50!' etc etc. I always point out how much cheaper it is than buying in a pet shop then neutering and vaccinating - but I think the problem is that those are things lots / most people wouldn't think about doing anyway :cry:

RSPCA Macclesfield
23-12-2012, 09:46 PM
A huge loss. Especially when we have longtermers with health issues. We only charge 20 per bun, and I've been thinking we should look at upping it. I did worry that it would mean that we had less interest in the rabbits, however I think actually, it may put off some of the less favourable offers of homes - so could work well with weeding out the not-great homes, therefore saving me lots of time in doing so!

happybun
23-12-2012, 09:50 PM
i don't think they just make a loss - i think they have a huge drain which sucks in money, which turns up on the day they first use the word 'rescue', or sometimes even before. not just rabbits. any rescue. its a hiding to nothing - it takes all your financial resources and all your emotional resources as well.
i worry about halfpenny, and hugo's there, and anyone else involved.

Lib_n_bunny
23-12-2012, 09:53 PM
The thing is, not only do they not make a profit, they don't make enought to pay a salary. Caroline at Rabbit Residence still lives with her parents, I'm sure if she didn't have that option she wouldn't be able to continue with the rescue, as she can't pay herself, let alone enough to pay rent bills etc.

halfpenny
23-12-2012, 10:05 PM
i don't think they just make a loss - i think they have a huge drain which sucks in money, which turns up on the day they first use the word 'rescue', or sometimes even before. not just rabbits. any rescue. its a hiding to nothing - it takes all your financial resources and all your emotional resources as well.
i worry about halfpenny, and hugo's there, and anyone else involved.

Thank you happybun.
In honesty, with the recession we are very much at the end of our financial limit and have to close our doors for a while until, hopefully things pick up.
We are lucky because Mike is in a well paid job, however that only means that we have more animals and more of his wage supports them. He pays over 2000 a month to cover bills, his bonus also gets swallowed up to fill the gaps with his wage. We take in about 100 a month on donations and have taken in about 4000 this year on fundraisers.
Our vet bills are above 1200 a month, feed bills are about 1500 a month a d we have maintenance on top of that. This year we spend about 1000 on the indoor goat and pig pens, the charity bought the materials but because the labour was a 'favour' we had to pay for it out of our own money as there would be no receipt, but it was cheaper overall.
So although Mike has a good wage and we should be well off, we panic if we need anything for ourselves because at the moment we are struggling to have enough money left at the end of the month.

bunnymadhouse
23-12-2012, 10:24 PM
you don't realise just how much rescues do until its written down infront of you! Do you mind me asking how you manage to keep open?

Over 10 years ago barc was a small home run charity which survived on donations and car boot sales . barc took in maybe 3 or 4 dogs at a time .
it grew from that to take in more and more dogs ...then cats ..then rabbits ..
it now takes in dogs , cats , rabbits , guinea pigs and birds .
we now have 5 charity shops ... we rent kennels and have some paid staff at the kennels and paid managers in the shops ...the bulk of us still give our time ...and often our money for free .

without the shops we just couldnt carry on on this scale ..it would be impossible .

we will never lose sight of how we started out ...and there is never enough money . :?

bunnymadhouse
23-12-2012, 10:25 PM
A huge loss. Especially when we have longtermers with health issues. We only charge 20 per bun, and I've been thinking we should look at upping it. I did worry that it would mean that we had less interest in the rabbits, however I think actually, it may put off some of the less favourable offers of homes - so could work well with weeding out the not-great homes, therefore saving me lots of time in doing so!

we neuter and vaccinate and charge 50 ...when we upped our fee we too worried ... but it has actualy increased the numbers adopted out and the quality of homes is better

Becky86
23-12-2012, 10:39 PM
Yep, a huge loss. We ask for a 40 adoption for a rabbit. Our neutering is 40 for a female, and 30 for a male. We then give the combi vacc, and rabbits are panacured. Most rabbits also require veterinary treatment, even if its just flea/mite treatment, but others need dentals etc.

Georgeypudding
23-12-2012, 10:56 PM
wow, I didn't realise BARC was so big! :D I suppose volunteers and donaters are incredibly important to all rescue, but even more so to the smaller ones (like BARC, honeybunnies etc) I think I'd actually be willing to pay even more than 50 for a rabbit, I paid 40 for Imogen and she wasn't vaccinated, I've been told she's neutered but not sure. That said I'd probably make a donation on top :) I can imagine the fee puts off a lot of people, but if they're put off by that then maybe they shouldn't have rabbits