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A_Couple_In_Love
26-11-2012, 01:16 PM
Hi all:wave:

I'm looking into getting my first 2 rabbits, I want to keep them indoor but I was wondering if you could help me on how to get started.

What types of housing do you keep all of your rabbits in, and what do you recommend for 2 rabbits (not dwarfs), size etc? Is it possible at all to keep your rabbit in a Pen, with bedding, food etc in there?

Also, stairs, are they allowed up and down the stairs, or is this unsafe?

All tips for a newbie is welcome .

Thanks!

little-laura
26-11-2012, 01:20 PM
Hello welcome to the forum

heres a helpful thread http://forums.rabbitrehome.org.uk/showthread.php?304613-Indoor-Housing

and another recent one on set ups indoor and out http://forums.rabbitrehome.org.uk/showthread.php?369091-Your-set-ups

heres a website showing min size requirements http://www.rabbitwelfare.co.uk/ahutchisnotenough.htm

Elena
26-11-2012, 01:21 PM
Hi ya,

I think this thread will help you a lot. Personally I much prefer bunny proofing a room or rooms as I find this masses easier than any pen.

http://forums.rabbitrehome.org.uk/showthread.php?304613-Indoor-Housing

They can use stairs but best to make sure they are ok with them before leaving them unsupervised.

Let us know if you have any more questions. :D

little-laura
26-11-2012, 01:22 PM
Hi ya,

I think this thread will help you a lot. Personally I much prefer bunny proofing a room or rooms as I find this masses easier than any pen.

http://forums.rabbitrehome.org.uk/showthread.php?304613-Indoor-Housing

They can use stairs but best to make sure they are ok with them before leaving them unsupervised.

Let us know if you have any more questions. :D

:P gave them that link already hehe

Elena
26-11-2012, 01:25 PM
:P gave them that link already hehe

:p you're too quick :p wasn't there when I replied :lol:

little-laura
26-11-2012, 01:29 PM
what kind of space do you have? some people on here have rooms the bunnies have to themselves, others have rooms they share with the bunnies ie the bunnies take up a lot of the space, some have appropriate sized set ups they stay in ie the largest of dog carts with a dog/puppy pen attached, or a set up made up of nic cubes and many other variants.

you need to make sure you have the space first

bethepoet
26-11-2012, 01:30 PM
There is a housing thread here (http://forums.rabbitrehome.org.uk/showthread.php?304613-Indoor-Housing) which covers pretty much everything.

You'll get different people with different preferences - mine is a dog crate. I think they're a lovely size, extremely easy to clean and just generally a really good base. You can also add an extra level/shelf to a dog crate. Also you could get a puppy pen and attach that on to the crate, giving even more space. Obviously they will still need outside time, too.

Mine are currently in the spare room along with a computer desk, I plan to move the desk and bunny-proof the room (something on the floor, preferably waterproof, to keep them from ruining your carpet/slipping if it's laminate, and something blocking off or protecting the walls so they can't chew the wallpaper) and have them free in there.

Mine run up and down stairs with no problems, although some rabbits might not like it.

Elena
26-11-2012, 01:36 PM
There is a housing thread here (http://forums.rabbitrehome.org.uk/showthread.php?304613-Indoor-Housing) which covers pretty much everything.

You'll get different people with different preferences - mine is a dog crate. I think they're a lovely size, extremely easy to clean and just generally a really good base. You can also add an extra level/shelf to a dog crate. Also you could get a puppy pen and attach that on to the crate, giving even more space. Obviously they will still need outside time, too.

Mine are currently in the spare room along with a computer desk, I plan to move the desk and bunny-proof the room (something on the floor, preferably waterproof, to keep them from ruining your carpet/slipping if it's laminate, and something blocking off or protecting the walls so they can't chew the wallpaper) and have them free in there.

Mine run up and down stairs with no problems, although some rabbits might not like it.

I'm surprised you find a dog crate easy to clean, I have to say I found it really difficult. But then apart from bunny proofing I've found everything they've had has been difficult to clean. Poos have a habit of finding their way into all the small spots :roll: But with a dog crate I found it really put strain on my back trying to get into all the corners.

Fellie
26-11-2012, 01:38 PM
As mentioned - everyone has different preferences and I also think it depends on how large a living space they will have.

Ours are both in outside hutches - 4ft by 4ft by 2 ft pens really but we are lucky in that we have the space. But in order for them to have a good quality they need lots of time outside their pens so it is really important you bunny proof - and even then they will still find something you've not thought about..;) We don't let our rabbits out free range if we're not there - just too scared we've forgotten about some electrical wire and they get to it...and plus they sleep most of the day even when they are allowed out so don't feel too bad keeping them in during the day when we're at work.

We use slate tiles for the base of their hutches to protect the floor and loads of cheap fleecy blankets and towels (from Ikea) which can be easily washed or replaced. And of course their litter trays.

But it's great - always seems slightly surreal to see a bunny bouce across the lounge whilst we're watching TV...

little-laura
26-11-2012, 01:42 PM
also take a look at this info it has information on costs and rabbits needs


http://www.rabbitrehome.org.uk/care/overview.asp

bethepoet
26-11-2012, 01:54 PM
I'm surprised you find a dog crate easy to clean, I have to say I found it really difficult. But then apart from bunny proofing I've found everything they've had has been difficult to clean. Poos have a habit of finding their way into all the small spots :roll: But with a dog crate I found it really put strain on my back trying to get into all the corners.

Well I put tarpaulin underneath and wrapped it up the sides, so it acts as sort of a skirt, nothing gets outside of the crate. Like I said, I hoover/wash the base and then it comes right out so I can hoover/wash underneath. It's so quick, I can do two within ten minutes, which is probably why it doesn't aggravate my back. I haven't added a second level yet as I have two crates with three rabbits in them - I'm hoping to bond them all, then connect the crates and have one side with a second level and the other a nice tall space where they can stand up. Maybe that's another reason I find it easier, I'm only cleaning one surface.

I definitely like it much better than anything else I've had - wood absorbs wee and plastic gets scratched and the dirt sinks in. When it was just Harriet I tried free ranging and within a week she was back in a base - she destroyed an entire room with digging/biting/peeing everywhere.

little-laura
26-11-2012, 01:58 PM
the bun room has been such a relief for me I dont have to climb in a cage to clean it, bend over for ages , just get a broom, dustpan and brush and mop ahh...... :)

Elena
26-11-2012, 01:59 PM
Well I put tarpaulin underneath and wrapped it up the sides, so it acts as sort of a skirt, nothing gets outside of the crate. Like I said, I hoover/wash the base and then it comes right out so I can hoover/wash underneath. It's so quick, I can do two within ten minutes, which is probably why it doesn't aggravate my back. I haven't added a second level yet as I have two crates with three rabbits in them - I'm hoping to bond them all, then connect the crates and have one side with a second level and the other a nice tall space where they can stand up. Maybe that's another reason I find it easier, I'm only cleaning one surface.

I definitely like it much better than anything else I've had - wood absorbs wee and plastic gets scratched and the dirt sinks in. When it was just Harriet I tried free ranging and within a week she was back in a base - she destroyed an entire room with digging/biting/peeing everywhere.

Ah, that'll be why then, I could never use the hoover with the rabbits around. Mischa and Mini were very much into everything and constantly noseing at what was going on. I had to shut them in the base to hoover so could never manage to hoover out the base itself.

A_Couple_In_Love
26-11-2012, 03:02 PM
Thanks for everyone's replies! :)

What would any of you recommend for easy cleaning and easy access? E.g. dog crate, puppy pen, rabbit cage and so on. Will not have the room for a bunnie room but will have enought room to have quite a big run and somewhere for it to rest.

One of us has had a rabbit as a child and it was completely different to how it's going to be when we have one now, specially as it's going to be an indoor rabbit and not in a hutch.

Any more tips on toys, cleaning and foods ect would be very welcome. :D

bethepoet
26-11-2012, 03:32 PM
Ah, that'll be why then, I could never use the hoover with the rabbits around. Mischa and Mini were very much into everything and constantly noseing at what was going on. I had to shut them in the base to hoover so could never manage to hoover out the base itself.

Ahh. Well we have the crates in the spare room, so I kick them out onto the landing while I'm doing my thing :D


Thanks for everyone's replies! :)

What would any of you recommend for easy cleaning and easy access? E.g. dog crate, puppy pen, rabbit cage and so on. Will not have the room for a bunnie room but will have enought room to have quite a big run and somewhere for it to rest.

One of us has had a rabbit as a child and it was completely different to how it's going to be when we have one now, specially as it's going to be an indoor rabbit and not in a hutch.

Any more tips on toys, cleaning and foods ect would be very welcome. :D

As I said, I personally think crates with a pen attached is the way to go (y)

For bedding I use fleece, rather than loose bedding, as it's cheaper and makes it easier to clean them out. I flick the fleece out every night, hoover up stray poo, then change the fleece once a week. Neutered/spayed rabbits are great at using litter boxes, so it doesn't get wet very often at all. If you're getting intact bunnies, I'd go with an absorbent bedding. I couldn't recommend one though as I don't use any. For litter trays most of us use those big underbed storage boxes - they like to be able to chill out in there, and they like to eat where they poo, so put their food and water close by/in it. Again, litter is down to personal preference. I use short cut straw, others use newspaper or dust-extracted wood shavings to name a couple. For cleaning supplies I use a pet safe disinfectant spray, which I use on the trays when I clean them out every second day. They will inevitably poo everywhere, though, so a hoover is a must for me. Failing that, a dustpan and brush.

As for food, a high-fibre pellet is best, you can check the content of most brands online. That should be 10% of the diet, if that. I have three big bunnies, so I give a couple of handfuls each morning. The bulk of their food should be hay. You can get loads of different types, it's up to you. They should never be without hay and should/will eat a bunch as big as themselves a day. Fresh vegetables should be leafy greens or herbs - kale, spring greens, parsley etc - with the occasional bit of carrot/pepper/spinach every once in a while, as they're high in sugar so should be given sparingly. All of this should be introduced slowly. Keep the same brand of pellets they have been eating and slowly switch them over by mixing them together and gradually phasing the old pellets out. Vegetables should be introduced in small amounts so as not to upset tummies. They will, however, ALWAYS act like you're starving them :roll: As long as they have hay there, don't worry, they're just greedy!

Toys - toilet roll tubes (you can also stuff hay in them), cardboard boxes, tunnels (you can make these out of some cardboard boxes lined up, or buy them online), hard plastic balls they can roll around (you can get a pack of five with holes in them from Poundland, which you can shove bits of food into), phone books, mine like these (http://www.wilkinsonplus.com/guinea-pig-food+hutches/wilko-carrot+corn-for-small-animals/invt/0303669/?htxt=DODZoB8dzeQKHg9IDzhf4AwBY4%2B90mg%2B%2B4KkC1 D%2B%2FkAhjfHFhK%2Bnw3sWQUqo6TkZRUR1E5X9Wggk%0A%2B 77do4qGnA%3D%3D) ... that's all I can think of right now. Wilkos has a brilliant little selection, as does P@H, but they're way more expensive. Of course the best toy is a friend that they can talk to when you're not around.

*lily*
26-11-2012, 04:05 PM
Thanks for everyone's replies! :)

What would any of you recommend for easy cleaning and easy access? E.g. dog crate, puppy pen, rabbit cage and so on. Will not have the room for a bunnie room but will have enought room to have quite a big run and somewhere for it to rest.

One of us has had a rabbit as a child and it was completely different to how it's going to be when we have one now, specially as it's going to be an indoor rabbit and not in a hutch.

Any more tips on toys, cleaning and foods ect would be very welcome. :D

For the easiest clean, totally freerange :D

parsnipbun
26-11-2012, 04:40 PM
I have 6 indoor buns at present and never bother with cages . I use child gates to stop two of them that dislike each other having fights . .

and no my house does NOT look like a stable!!

They are very neat and just poo in their litter trays (of hay) .

A_Couple_In_Love
27-11-2012, 11:40 AM
Ahh. Well we have the crates in the spare room, so I kick them out onto the landing while I'm doing my thing :D



As I said, I personally think crates with a pen attached is the way to go (y)

For bedding I use fleece, rather than loose bedding, as it's cheaper and makes it easier to clean them out. I flick the fleece out every night, hoover up stray poo, then change the fleece once a week. Neutered/spayed rabbits are great at using litter boxes, so it doesn't get wet very often at all. If you're getting intact bunnies, I'd go with an absorbent bedding. I couldn't recommend one though as I don't use any. For litter trays most of us use those big underbed storage boxes - they like to be able to chill out in there, and they like to eat where they poo, so put their food and water close by/in it. Again, litter is down to personal preference. I use short cut straw, others use newspaper or dust-extracted wood shavings to name a couple. For cleaning supplies I use a pet safe disinfectant spray, which I use on the trays when I clean them out every second day. They will inevitably poo everywhere, though, so a hoover is a must for me. Failing that, a dustpan and brush.

As for food, a high-fibre pellet is best, you can check the content of most brands online. That should be 10% of the diet, if that. I have three big bunnies, so I give a couple of handfuls each morning. The bulk of their food should be hay. You can get loads of different types, it's up to you. They should never be without hay and should/will eat a bunch as big as themselves a day. Fresh vegetables should be leafy greens or herbs - kale, spring greens, parsley etc - with the occasional bit of carrot/pepper/spinach every once in a while, as they're high in sugar so should be given sparingly. All of this should be introduced slowly. Keep the same brand of pellets they have been eating and slowly switch them over by mixing them together and gradually phasing the old pellets out. Vegetables should be introduced in small amounts so as not to upset tummies. They will, however, ALWAYS act like you're starving them :roll: As long as they have hay there, don't worry, they're just greedy!

Toys - toilet roll tubes (you can also stuff hay in them), cardboard boxes, tunnels (you can make these out of some cardboard boxes lined up, or buy them online), hard plastic balls they can roll around (you can get a pack of five with holes in them from Poundland, which you can shove bits of food into), phone books, mine like these (http://www.wilkinsonplus.com/guinea-pig-food+hutches/wilko-carrot+corn-for-small-animals/invt/0303669/?htxt=DODZoB8dzeQKHg9IDzhf4AwBY4%2B90mg%2B%2B4KkC1 D%2B%2FkAhjfHFhK%2Bnw3sWQUqo6TkZRUR1E5X9Wggk%0A%2B 77do4qGnA%3D%3D) ... that's all I can think of right now. Wilkos has a brilliant little selection, as does P@H, but they're way more expensive. Of course the best toy is a friend that they can talk to when you're not around.

That is all very helpful! Learned alot from this. Thank you! :)

A_Couple_In_Love
27-11-2012, 11:42 AM
Thanks for everyones advice! :)