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bunbun5
31-10-2012, 09:17 AM
As title really, we are in the throws of organising a home inspection, as we want to re-home a rescue bunny for our male Monty.

Just wondered what I should expect? What they look out for/at etc?

We have already submitted photos of our bunny accommodation and run setup. What else should I be aware of?

Many thanks as always:D

Georgeypudding
31-10-2012, 09:20 AM
they'll come in and have a look at your accomodation, make sure it's nice and safe and the same as you'd submitted :lol: make sure you aren't some sort of horder :lol:

They won't be looking at how clean your home is, or anything like that :) just making sure the rabbits will be well cared for :)

bunbun5
31-10-2012, 09:24 AM
they'll come in and have a look at your accomodation, make sure it's nice and safe and the same as you'd submitted :lol: make sure you aren't some sort of horder :lol:

They won't be looking at how clean your home is, or anything like that :) just making sure the rabbits will be well cared for :)

:lol: Thanks

Sky-O
31-10-2012, 09:43 AM
This is what I used to look at. Really it was more to get to know people; the accommodation aspect was only a small part of it, for me.



The Rabbit Home Visit Process
Before you can adopt a rabbit, or a pair of rabbits, you will need to have a home visit to assess your set up. Rabbits need a secure living environment that is large enough for them to exercise in and display natural behaviours.
Here is a list of the majority of areas that will be looked at which should help you prepare your accommodation for the home visit.
We assess
 That a pair of medium rabbits have permanent access to a minimum of 45 to 50sqft. i.e. access to this sized area all of the time, 24/7. For larger rabbits or groups of more than two, the size requirement will be discussed with you to ensure you can meet the needs of the rabbits.
 The outdoor accommodation has a roof and is sheltered in some way.
 There is a ‘sleeping area’ for the rabbits and that they can BOTH or ALL fully stretch out, lie together and also lie apart in this sleeping area.
 That the rabbits can stand up fully on their back legs without their ears touching the roof in the greater part / majority of the accommodation.
 The accommodation is protected from rain, wind snow and cold when necessary. Being mindful of bottles/bowls freezing and having access to extra protection when we have really cold weather.
 The accommodation is protected from sun/heat when necessary. Shade protection from the sun is just as important as protection from horrible weather, more so in a lot of cases.
 The rabbits cannot escape the accommodation either by jumping, digging or chewing.
 There are no plants poisonous to rabbits in the area they will go in, or if there are any you block these off.
 There are no materials that may harm a rabbit if eaten and, if they are indoor rabbits, there are no (electrical) wires in the area the rabbit could chew or that they are securely blocked off - rabbits love to chew!
 The paint or wood treatment/preservative used on any area is safe and non-toxic for rabbits if they have a nibble (i.e. no creosote).
 The fastenings (catches/locks) are safe and secure and not easily opened (bolts or hasps and padlocks can work well).
 The mesh is heavy gauge and small enough to prevent rodents getting through (i.e. chicken wire is not suitable).
 The area is secure enough to prevent any predator getting in. If you know of foxes in your area you will need to think about additional deterrents. Cats, dogs and birds of prey, amongst others, are also considered predators of rabbits.
 That the accommodation is appropriate for the specific rabbit/s you would like to adopt (for example, rabbits with rex fur (fur like velvet) have lots of soft places to go on so they don’t get sore hocks).
 That you have thought about whether the rabbits you would like are suitable for your family circumstances- i.e. is a timid rabbit or a rabbit who likes to nip suitable for a family with young children?
 For people adopting one rabbit from the RSPCA to bond with a current rabbit.
o The new rabbit has somewhere suitable and separate to live whilst s/he is being bonded with your current rabbit. A good idea, if possible, would be to temporarily divide your accommodation while the rabbits get to know each other.
o Your rabbit needs to be fully up to date with his/her vaccinations (for both Myxomatosis and VHD). Evidence will be required.
o Your rabbit needs to be spayed/neutered (several weeks prior to dating one of our rabbits at the Centre to give the bond the maximum chance of success as the hormones will have started to die down).
__________________________________________________ ___________________

The home visit will include a general chat with you and your family and you will also receive a Rabbit information Pack prior to your home visit with helpful information about rabbits and caring for them in. The home visitor should also be able to answer any questions or concerns you have about any aspect of owning rabbits.
If you have any questions or concerns about the home visit or how to meet any of these areas then please feel free to talk to a member of staff at the Animal Centre on X or the rabbit home visitor, who can be contacted on 07706076097 or therabbitlady@googlemail.com and also contacted via www.flashsplace.webs.com
Is a rabbit the right pet for you and your family? Rabbits make great pets but are a huge responsibility and need owners who are going to be fully committed to them all their lives.

madcatwoman
31-10-2012, 09:48 AM
When we first got rabbits the rspca came to inspect us, she was there just long enough to say hello, yes that looks find and go! She certainly didnt do all that is in the above post.

My more recent rabbits have gone on our description of what we have and do and also pictures. I do think sometimes when you have a rescue you must get a gut feeling with prospective owners of whether it will be right or wrong. Im not suggesting for one minute that thats why you are having an inspection, all rescues are different. I actually think homes should be checked out physically and not just for rabbits.

bunbun5
31-10-2012, 09:53 AM
This is what I used to look at. Really it was more to get to know people; the accommodation aspect was only a small part of it, for me.

Thats really helpful. thank you

Mrs. Bunnykins
02-11-2012, 08:02 PM
Best of luck with your home visit.

RedFraggle
02-11-2012, 08:46 PM
When the RSPCA came to us they also wanted to see the vaccination card of our cat and see him. He performed beautifully, bounding up the garden as soon as I called him like the much loved pet that he is!

Michelleox
02-11-2012, 10:11 PM
They will also ask you what you will do with bun when you are on holiday,and bout your vet arrangements etc. They will make sure you haven't got ten Greyhounds in the back garden and any rabbit stew recipes taped up on the fridge.

RedFraggle
02-11-2012, 10:17 PM
They will also ask you what you will do with bun when you are on holiday,and bout your vet arrangements etc. They will make sure you haven't got ten Greyhounds in the back garden and any rabbit stew recipes taped up on the fridge.

:lol: