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bunnymummy1979
13-10-2012, 07:46 AM
Morning Everyone!!!!,

Is anyone sad like me lol, and just google bunnies just because i love them so much and love reading about them lol....

Anyway, I was doing my usual this morning and came across a breed I have never heard of before...beveren. They are absolutely stunning, espically the blues, but there is next to no information on them. Are they a super rare breed?. They clearly get very large, but then so do frenchies so im guessing that wouldnt be why theres not much info on them, just wondered if any of you ladies had heard of them and why they do not seem too popular...they really are stunning!! x

Love

Mummybunny x

susie bun
13-10-2012, 08:52 AM
I've heard of them, but don't know much about them. :wave:

Sky-O
13-10-2012, 09:01 AM
There was a Bev at the rescue I was volunteering with. I also know of someone who breeds them. they are super rare (I believe only two breeders in the UK, but there may be more now) so their gene pool is rare. Due to poor breeding in the past and an inappropriate diet (medicated pellets) they do, I believe, have a tendency to not be overly healthy and have a predisposition to Cocci, although none of those I have worked with have these issues, but that may be for several reasons.

They have a very cheeky nature and are beautiful. They are just stunning in all ways. :love:

suzibunbun
13-10-2012, 09:55 AM
I actually saw a blue beveren only last Saturday!! She was stunning and was named Bluebell - she is residing at Reaseheath college in the Animal Management course centre. I was so pleased to see such a beauty - she was large but not massive xx

bunnymummy1979
13-10-2012, 10:07 AM
They are stunning arent they, but I wonder why they are so rare x

blue_vix
13-10-2012, 10:26 AM
I think it just depends how many people are interested in breeding them. Thrianta's where considered rare when I got Toby but I think there are 20 or so breeders about now. You can get hold of them, but then again comparative to the number of people who breed various lops and lionheads and nethies etc it's still a very small number.

I wouldn't have thought they could have a predisposition to cocci, because thats a bacterial (parasitic) infection not a genetic problem but if there are only a very small number of breeders then there is a higher risk of cross contamination and them being carriers I guess. I have found my Thrianta's seem to be more badly affected than the others with whatever they have (poss cocci, or ec) so maybe as their genepool is so small they have not developed as strong a genetic immunity to various illnesses.

Sky-O
13-10-2012, 10:36 AM
I think it just depends how many people are interested in breeding them. Thrianta's where considered rare when I got Toby but I think there are 20 or so breeders about now. You can get hold of them, but then again comparative to the number of people who breed various lops and lionheads and nethies etc it's still a very small number.

I wouldn't have thought they could have a predisposition to cocci, because thats a bacterial (parasitic) infection not a genetic problem but if there are only a very small number of breeders then there is a higher risk of cross contamination and them being carriers I guess. I have found my Thrianta's seem to be more badly affected than the others with whatever they have (poss cocci, or ec) so maybe as their genepool is so small they have not developed as strong a genetic immunity to various illnesses.

They have previously been fed medicated pellets which is believed to provide protection against Cocci, however, when taken off them, their immune system is lower and due to the rabbit not having the necessary strong immune system to fight Cocci naturally it can cause a problem in that respect. It also means that there is a risk of resistance to this too.


Rabbit breeders often feed medicated pellets to prevent the intestinal forms of coccidiosis. They are called ACS pellets because they contain a 'coccidiostat' such as clopidol, robenidine, or salinomycin. However these are available only from feed merchants who have a pharmaceutical licence which allows them to sell medicated pellets. Like all drugs, there is a risk of the organism becoming resistant. I also discovered when carrying out some research for a UK feed producer in the 1990s, that rabbit breeders were mixing ACS pellets with their normal mix, effectively halving the recommended dose.
http://www.rabbit-information.co.uk/coccidiosis.php

The better breeders are not feeding medicated pellets and are focusing on making their bunnies as healthy as possible and so this predisposition is being bred out, thankfully.

blue_vix
13-10-2012, 12:18 PM
I was just meaning I don't think it is technically a predisposition? I think that's the wrong word. Like you can't have a predisposition for getting a cold, it's just some people they are more at risk if they do catch it.

i was advised with mine that a lot of breeders are also treating with a medication for pigeons coxiod but it's not recommended by vets to I have erred on the side of caution with that one. i asked my vet to change the Baytril for septrin on advice of someone here (thankyou) In my googlings I never came across a feed for it, is that actually intended and safe for use in rabbits?