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View Full Version : 5 week old bunnies removed from mum



BlueRexBoy
24-08-2011, 09:01 PM
I am picking up two 5 and a half week old buns tomorrow. The lady who bred them has rehomed their mum so I am getting them tomorrow. Will they be ok? I thought it was 8 weeks. They are eating well I have been informed. Any advice greatly appreciated. Thank you

weeble
24-08-2011, 09:04 PM
8 weeks would be better if they can stay with their mum longer. have you asked why they are leaving so young?

Foodwise I would find out what they are on and stick to that. They will need a lot as they are young and growing

LauryStevens
24-08-2011, 09:04 PM
Definatly WAY to young, 8 weeks is the minimum for most people, but 10 week sor older is more ideal.....She doesn't sound like a good breeder, more like a fortune finder.....

Someone should help soon with advice on what to do, definatly get the babies though if you are willing to look after them properly :) they may need a little extra work though.

Sky-O
24-08-2011, 09:05 PM
That sounds like a lady who doesn't give a flying about her animals :|

Ideally it's best not to remove them until they are 8 weeks, but they may be better off in your care given that they won't have mum wherever they are.

BlueRexBoy
24-08-2011, 09:20 PM
She had quite a lot of rexes and bred all her does but then was suprised she couldn't sell them. She advertised them for money, which is when I bought and paid for one, then she advertised them for free so she said I could have a second for nothing.
The mother has been rehomed as she wanted rid of them all. I jsut found out now the mother has gone.
I am an experienced rabbit owner so am willing and able to care for them correctly, I just need a few pointers to enable me to do that. DH said they will be better with me if they are without their mother, bless them.
I think there are 4 in total, I'm tempted to take all 4 and rehome 2 at a later date. Not sure if this is a good idea?
Thank you for your help so far:)

bluebunny
24-08-2011, 09:23 PM
Where are these rabbits?

BlueRexBoy
24-08-2011, 09:28 PM
Near where I live in the south west.

LoopyLou2087
24-08-2011, 09:29 PM
She had quite a lot of rexes and bred all her does but then was suprised she couldn't sell them. She advertised them for money, which is when I bought and paid for one, then she advertised them for free so she said I could have a second for nothing.
The mother has been rehomed as she wanted rid of them all. I jsut found out now the mother has gone.
I am an experienced rabbit owner so am willing and able to care for them correctly, I just need a few pointers to enable me to do that. DH said they will be better with me if they are without their mother, bless them.
I think there are 4 in total, I'm tempted to take all 4 and rehome 2 at a later date. Not sure if this is a good idea?
Thank you for your help so far:)

Personally I would take them all if I could for fear of what would happen to them if I didn't. Even if all I did was make sure they were well looked after until I could find them proper homes..

parsnipbun
24-08-2011, 09:34 PM
they will probably need supplementary feeding with a powdered cats milk and avipro mix - their stomachs will almost undoubtedly not be adapted to pellets etc - though hopefully she will have provided hay (though she sounds pretty awful so may not have done).

Biscuit's Mum!
24-08-2011, 09:35 PM
How sad :( Glad that someone who knows what they are doing will be caring for them.

luvabun
24-08-2011, 09:39 PM
:( One good thing out of this is that she wants "rid of them all". Hopefully she's realised that there's no money to be made in breeding rabbits and has called it a day.

good on you for taking a couple of these furballs on board and wanting to do the best for them. I look forward to progress reports and sorry I have no advice for the babbas. Hopefully you'll get the advice you need on here :)

BlueRexBoy
24-08-2011, 09:39 PM
Thats what I'm thinking but I need to consider what age will they need to be seperated to prevent breeding? I have a 7ft hutch on the patio and a huge run, but my spare cage is an indoor guinea pig one only 3ft long which I use for post spey/castration observation and illness, not really big enough for buns. They are mini rexes. Also DH will go mad if I come home with more than 2.

The Duchess
24-08-2011, 09:41 PM
Good grief, well at least you are taking them on and doing your best.

I think it's quite likely that any bunny taken so young will develop stomach issues in the future as the whole point of mum feeding them until 8 weeks is to give them all they need to do well after that point. We've definitely seen bunnies that haven't been weened correctly not getting the right gut bacteria which has been problematic in the future. So, I agree with Parsnip bun about suplementary feeding and possibly a pro biotic (although I'd take advice from a bunny savvy vet on that one).

I hope they thrive in your care and we look forward to photos.:D

Biscuit's Mum!
24-08-2011, 09:41 PM
:( One good thing out of this is that she wants "rid of them all". Hopefully she's realised that there's no money to be made in breeding rabbits and has called it a day.

good on you for taking a couple of these furballs on board and wanting to do the best for them. I look forward to progress reports and sorry I have no advice for the babbas. Hopefully you'll get the advice you need on here :)

I'd definitely get them vet-checked as soon as they come to you. Breeders wanting to "get rid" of stock worries me a bit. :?

parsnipbun
24-08-2011, 09:42 PM
I separated my (accidental) babies at 11 weeks (we were pushing it a bit there) and popped them back together as soon as the boys were done at 14 weeks. We kept them within sight sound and smell of each other in that 3 weeks.

They are now 4.5 months and the girls are still all together (with the boys) and we have had no fights etc yet - we will spay the girls at 5 -6 months so watching carefully to make sure no spats in the meantime.

PS such young babies as these rexes will have very little chance of survival if taken by an inexperienced person or kept as singles - they still need the comfort and heat of all their brothers and sisters (and their mum for reall feed:()

BlueRexBoy
24-08-2011, 09:43 PM
they will probably need supplementary feeding with a powdered cats milk and avipro mix - their stomachs will almost undoubtedly not be adapted to pellets etc - though hopefully she will have provided hay (though she sounds pretty awful so may not have done).

Well, when I viewed them there wasn't much hay, just a big bowl of museli mix:shock:

Where can I get this milk from? Can I buy both fro the supermarket or do I need to go to the vet for it. I assume I put it in a water bottle for them to help themselves?

She fed the previous litters greens and said she had to wash their bums as they had messy bums. Oh dear. I should have walked away I know, but now these buns are being given away and I know about them and can't turn a blind eye.

Sky-O
24-08-2011, 09:44 PM
Personally I would be worried about supplementing feeding given that their gut is an adult one. Supplementing the wrong thing can make them iller (nearly lost one of mine when she was supplemented). After a rabbit is four weeks they have an adult gut and can do fine without supplements. I have only ever given pellets and loads of good quality hay, and sometimes some oats- which are easy and kind on the tummy.

That is only my personal opinion, not a recomendation.

parsnipbun
24-08-2011, 09:46 PM
Personally I would be worried about supplementing feeding given that their gut is an adult one. Supplementing the wrong thing can make them iller (nearly lost one of mine when she was supplemented). After a rabbit is four weeks they have an adult gut and can do fine without supplements. I have only ever given pellets and loads of good quality hay, and sometimes some oats- which are easy and kind on the tummy.

That is only my personal opinion, not a recomendation.

probably depends on whether they have properly weaned - my lot were still greedy for mums milk at 12 weeks:shock: alongside the pellets and hay.

We fed our abandoned wildie cat milk and avipro until he was 5 weeks - when he voluntarily stopped.

BlueRexBoy
24-08-2011, 09:46 PM
[QUOTE=luvabun;4941383]:( One good thing out of this is that she wants "rid of them all". Hopefully she's realised that there's no money to be made in breeding rabbits and has called it a day.

QUOTE]
She said that. They are demolishing their breeding blocks so they won't be tempted to get anymore.

Sky-O
24-08-2011, 09:48 PM
probably depends on whether they have properly weaned - my lot were still greedy for mums milk at 12 weeks:shock: alongside the pellets and hay.

We fed our abandoned wildie cat milk and avipro until he was 5 weeks - when he voluntarily stopped.

I'm not sure. The ones I had definitely were not weaned properly. In this case these have been without mum's milk for a significant period of time already and will have adjusted to that, so re-adding something so 'dodgy' back in could potentially cause problems, even re-adding mum's milk back in at a point when they have been without it can be dodgy.

That was my concern, that's all, and only my opinion. The OP can make the choice based on different opinions and options :)

poppymoon
24-08-2011, 10:22 PM
i'm afraid i have no advice as i've never dealt with such young bunnies but i too would be tempted to keep them all together for now as they are so young to be away from their mum.

nursecroft
24-08-2011, 10:35 PM
Oh poor babies, Im in South West too :wave: well done for agreeing to take them, I hope they will be ok.

nessar
24-08-2011, 11:32 PM
Oh dear, what a horrible situation to be in...

Personally, I would get plenty of the dried food she has them on, and some good quality meadow hay, and offer them unlimited of both. No veg, greens etc and no fancy rich hays or grass.

I would talk to your vet about probotics, but I would go see the vet without them. Unless they are visibly ill, I think the stress of the vets may do more harm than good.

If you can I would take the whole litter, but be aware rehoming rabbits is slow, and they'll to be vacced and neutered before rehoming. The general rule is to separate the sexes at 12 weeks, however some boys drop their plums earlier than that. If you can find a vet to get the whole litter (including girls) neutered at 15-16 weeks or earlier, then you can keep the litter together, this is what Alice at Windwhistle Warren rescue does so she can keep them together. Although the bucks are sexually mature at this age, the does usually arent, or if they are the pregnancy would not be far enough along to cause an issue, or even be noticed during speying. There are, of course, always exceptions with how fast buns develop, but these are the general rules.

BlueRexBoy
25-08-2011, 06:44 AM
Thanks, I would not be able to afford to spey and neuter and vaccinate all 4 of them before rehoming, I'm not a rescue just your average bunny owner. I have budgeted to neuter the two that I originally intended to get and vaccinate them too, but all four is pushing the boat a bit.
I would have to rehome them whole. If of the opposite sex they would have to go singly. Oh dear, this is all getting rather complicated now as I would want to find the best homes for them. At present I have no emotional attachment to them, once I have cared for them I will fall in love with them, at the mo I just feel so sorry for them.

:|

Hoppla
25-08-2011, 08:00 AM
First of all I think it is great that you are going to look after them. God knows where they would end up otherwise. Probably as a toy for some kid playing them to death

I am not an expert but rabbit specific probiotics like bo lapis may help. But pls check with a bunny savvy vet first. And never ever any probiotics for humans.

I rescued my 8.5 year old bunny at 5 weeks and he is the healthiest bunny ever.
Whereas my half wildie who still took mum's milk at 12 weeks went into stasis at least once a month during his first year

Whilst I agree that a baby should be with mum until 8-10 wks, there are always exceptions to the rule.

I wouldn't worry too much. They are without mum now anyway and the most important thing is for you to rescue them from this reckless breeder.

Chipmunk_K
25-08-2011, 09:14 AM
I had to separate mum and baby at 5 weeks, as he was so sick, and mum was healthy, the only thing we (vet and i) could think of was that mummy was carrying something to harm the babies, (2 had already died) He was very sick but he pulled through, was happy to eat baby food, and didn't seem to miss milk, it's at around 4/5 week that they start on solids, I believe you have a good chance at helping them.

dizzyg
25-08-2011, 09:45 AM
The poor darlings!

I'm going to sound cruel and blunt here but...if we all tried to save every bunny on freeads, or in the PAH adoption thing, we'd all be overrun.

You say you can afford to neuter and vacc two, well that's great, two saved is better than none...two bunnies who will have a lovely home with someone who will do their best by them.

That's just my opinion...

Hope they're ok.

xx

Tracy
25-08-2011, 09:52 AM
I took on a little family of 4 siblings who were orphaned at 4 weeks old. I kept them indoors just so that I could keep a close eye on them and protect them from any infections etc. I was very careful with hygiene, even to the point where I would change my clothes before and after handling/feeding them to avoid any cross-contamination with my other buns as I wasn't sure how strong their immunity would be.

All of them were already eating mix and hay when mum died. They were on mix at the rescue, so I kept them on this as they seemed to be doing well on it and I didn't want to change anything. I weaned them onto SS pellets at about 12 weeks old. One of them was very tiny and didn't seem to be able to manipulate food as well as the other three and wasn't so quick at eating. I'd sit with them and make sure that the littlest one got her share. I can't remember at what point I introduced greens, but I did it extremely slowly and started off with very tiny amounts, eg a fingernail sized piece of cabbage each.

These bunnies are very special to me. I took mum and the little ones out of the rescue when mum became ill so I could nurse her at home. When she died I promised her I would make sure her little ones were OK.....they are a year old now and have grown up into very healthy strong bunnies, so I kept my promise. :)

I'm no expert and this was my first experience of baby bunnies, but I managed it fine. I think my advice would be just to watch them very closely and make sure that they are all growing (weighing them weekly is a good idea). I think your little ones will be OK, especially as they have each other and they now have you to look out for them :D so don't worry too much and enjoy watching them grow up. :love:

i-love-bunnies
25-08-2011, 10:33 AM
Was this breeder in Hook? If so this is where I got Matilda, Laura and Heidi from. It was a disgusting place and I still think about the buns I left behind.

BlueRexBoy
25-08-2011, 01:47 PM
I'm going to sound cruel and blunt here but...if we all tried to save every bunny on freeads, or in the PAH adoption thing, we'd all be overrun.

You say you can afford to neuter and vacc two, well that's great, two saved is better than none...two bunnies who will have a lovely home with someone who will do their best by them.

That's just my opinion...

Hope they're ok.

I don't think that is cruel what you wrote, my husband feels the same. Taking on 4 youngsters would be too much for me. I have slept on this (even dreamt about it!) and I have to think of my other buns that I have so the original plan was 2 and i will come home with 2, and give them the best care I can. (unless me taking 2 leaves 1 behind, then I will make an exception)
Thank you all ever so much for your input, I will look into rabbit savy vets for advice on probiotics and take any there that look ill.

:)

xx[/QUOTE]