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thenamesJT
23-08-2011, 09:44 AM
I dont get it, I see no use for a collar on a rabbit apart from 'making my bunny look cute'. :roll:

To rescues, would you allow one of your buns to go to a new home that had suitable accommodation etc BUT the new owner put a collar on the bun?

I just dont see the appeal of it, buns have such delicate little necks. :(

paulinejoe
23-08-2011, 09:50 AM
I think it would be dangerous tbh, they'd end up catching it on something and strangling themselves probably. Collars on animals are purely for attaching I.D to to show they are pets in cats and for dogs for attaching ID and leads to IMO.

missFloppyears
23-08-2011, 09:53 AM
i wondered this too:wave:
saying that poppet could do with a bell she merges into the darkness:lol:

thenamesJT
23-08-2011, 09:54 AM
I think it would be dangerous tbh, they'd end up catching it on something and strangling themselves probably. Collars on animals are purely for attaching I.D to to show they are pets in cats and for dogs for attaching ID and leads to IMO.


Exactly! It must be so restricting & uncomfortable for the buns. :cry:

GrahamL
23-08-2011, 09:54 AM
It's wrong, it's immoral.

It's a rabbit - not a god damn dog or cat!

:cry:

Anyone who does it, needs their head seeing to, as it would NEVER be for the rabbits benefit.

thenamesJT
23-08-2011, 09:56 AM
It's wrong, it's immoral.

It's a rabbit - not a god damn dog or cat!

:cry:

Anyone who does it, needs their head seeing to, as it would NEVER be for the rabbits benefit.

My thoughts exactly, anyone who puts a collar on a rabbit is not a responsible owner.

chul
23-08-2011, 09:58 AM
I will admit I put one on Bunsk once.

He hated it, so I took it off... pretty quickly!

That was before I knew as much as I do now, and I do not agree with collars on rabbits. They are far too fragile and nervous animals.

poppymoon
23-08-2011, 10:24 AM
eh? who has a collar on a rabbit?!! sounds pretty dangerous to me and totally pointless.

thenamesJT
23-08-2011, 10:45 AM
eh? who has a collar on a rabbit?!! sounds pretty dangerous to me and totally pointless.

yup, very dangerous! My buns love to climb, they'd end up strangling themselves!

I just hope anyone considering it reads this thread & decides against it.

chul
23-08-2011, 10:46 AM
yup, very dangerous! My buns love to climb, they'd end up strangling themselves!

I just hope anyone considering it reads this thread & decides against it.

Me too...

I feel stupid ever trying it, even though it was for like... an hour or so. :(

ShazzaBunny
23-08-2011, 10:48 AM
Definatly not, i dont particularly like having a collar on my cat either, but she needs it until i can get her previous owner to change her microchip details :roll:

shadow05
23-08-2011, 10:56 AM
i thought about doing it but never got around to trying it but now that i think about its pretty stupid and would probably just be a waste of money.

i did however try a harness on scooter when he was younger the idea was so that i cud get him out more because my mom was very strict about letting him out on his own or even supervised at the time. but he never took to it since then ive tried it once more on him to see how he wud take it after being neutered but he still didnt take to it and ive never tried it again since. just doesnt seem worth it to me.

FarplaceRescue
23-08-2011, 10:57 AM
A few years back I had 8 identical baby rabbits and I put different coloured cat collars on them so I could tell them apart. They ate them.
Nowadays, if I need to ID rabbits, I microchip them. Much safer.

thenamesJT
23-08-2011, 10:57 AM
Me too...

I feel stupid ever trying it, even though it was for like... an hour or so. :(

Chul, yes it was a daft idea but you soon realised your mistake. Its all about learning & listening to others! :thumb: You are an ace bunny mum!

thenamesJT
23-08-2011, 10:59 AM
i thought about doing it but never got around to trying it but now that i think about its pretty stupid and would probably just be a waste of money.

i did however try a harness on scooter when he was younger the idea was so that i cud get him out more because my mom was very strict about letting him out on his own or even supervised at the time. but he never took to it since then ive tried it once more on him to see how he wud take it after being neutered but he still didnt take to it and ive never tried it again since. just doesnt seem worth it to me.


Im glad you have decided against it, use the money you wouldve spent on a pointless collar & spend it on a nice treat for scooter. :)

VickiP
23-08-2011, 11:03 AM
eh? who has a collar on a rabbit?!! sounds pretty dangerous to me and totally pointless.

^^ my thoughts exactly, a no brainer, can't see any logical reason for it :)

chul
23-08-2011, 11:03 AM
Chul, yes it was a daft idea but you soon realised your mistake. Its all about learning & listening to others! :thumb: You are an ace bunny mum!

I didn't even need to listen to others after he tried to chew it off his own neck :shock:

I would hope a rescue wouldn't rehome if they knew a collar would be put on.

shadow05
23-08-2011, 11:07 AM
Im glad you have decided against it, use the money you wouldve spent on a pointless collar & spend it on a nice treat for scooter. :)

i dont think there would be any point in putting a collar on a rabbit any ways because if they didnt get it stuck on something and strangel themselves then they wud just try and chew it off so it wud end up being a waste of money with scooter hes more than likely to chew it off when ever he see the harness laying on the floor now he just attacks it lol.

Mischief and Tinker's Mum
23-08-2011, 11:09 AM
It's pointless really. I know some people are against harnesses but at least sometimes they do benefit bunnies because it's how some are exercised. With collars though, there's not really any benefits and i don't imagine them to be comfortable?

CharlieBabbit
23-08-2011, 11:16 AM
I am entirely playing devil's advocate here as I have not and do not intend to put a collar on my buns as it would serve no purpose at all but....

Why so anti? Cats wear collars all the time and they climb, explore, squeeze into all sorts of nooks and crannies....I can't see how a cat is any less likely to get caught up than a rabbit. They actually have far more opportunity to get snagged than the average bun, just based on their wider variety of encounters in their habitat. If a rabbit got used to a collar as a baby and wore one continuously, they would not be distressed by it. The only thing I have seen so far that would be a major issue would be the inclination for their bunny companion to chew it....but that would just make it a practical issue not a moral issue.

I just wondered why there is such a vehement reaction to this, especially the 'immoral' comment? I have four cats, none of which wear collars as they are indoor cats and are all microchipped but if they were outdoor cats, they would have collars for ID purposes, just to make it quicker to relocate them if lost or, god forbid, injured or killed on the road. My choice for them to go collarless is mainly an aesthetic one....I think they look much nicer without collars and the microchip will do the job in the unlikley event of them getting out of the house and getting lost.

I can understand people saying a collar on a rabbit would look wrong or is unnecessary due to the unlikelihood of needing it for ID but cannot quite get my head round the 'it's terribly dangerous or immoral' points?

Don't jump on me, this is a curiosity, not a criticism of any kind but I am interested in the 'back up' for your opinions xxx :D

thenamesJT
23-08-2011, 11:25 AM
I am entirely playing devil's advocate here as I have not and do not intend to put a collar on my buns as it would serve no purpose at all but....

Why so anti? Cats wear collars all the time and they climb, explore, squeeze into all sorts of nooks and crannies....I can't see how a cat is any less likely to get caught up than a rabbit. They actually have far more opportunity to get snagged than the average bun, just based on their wider variety of encounters in their habitat. If a rabbit got used to a collar as a baby and wore one continuously, they would not be distressed by it. The only thing I have seen so far that would be a major issue would be the inclination for their bunny companion to chew it....but that would just make it a practical issue not a moral issue.

I just wondered why there is such a vehement reaction to this, especially the 'immoral' comment? I have four cats, none of which wear collars as they are indoor cats and are all microchipped but if they were outdoor cats, they would have collars for ID purposes, just to make it quicker to relocate them if lost or, god forbid, injured or killed on the road. My choice for them to go collarless is mainly an aesthetic one....I think they look much nicer without collars and the microchip will do the job in the unlikley event of them getting out of the house and getting lost.

I can understand people saying a collar on a rabbit would look wrong or is unnecessary due to the unlikelihood of needing it for ID but cannot quite get my head round the 'it's terribly dangerous or immoral' points?

Don't jump on me, this is a curiosity, not a criticism of any kind but I am interested in the 'back up' for your opinions xxx :D

Thanks for your post, I wouldnt dream on jumping on you, everyone is entitled to their own opinion. :)

Why I feel so strongly against the use on collars on rabbits is due to the fact that they have such delicate necks & thin skin, I'd worry that the collar is uncomfortable for them. Also, I feel that if we start thinking that collars on rabbits is acceptable what next? Collars on Geckos, hamsters etc?

donnamt
23-08-2011, 11:29 AM
i dont like collars on any animals :(

Ralph our dog only wears one when he is out and that is because i need to put him on a lead :(, in the house it comes off straight away.

ive seen a cat walking with a collar half round its neck and half round its leg because its somehow got caught and tried to escape, infact Ste's mom adopted a cat that was abandoned and the collar had caused him horrific injuries by the time he was found :cry: :cry:

i think they are horrible things :evil:

chul
23-08-2011, 11:32 AM
I am entirely playing devil's advocate here as I have not and do not intend to put a collar on my buns as it would serve no purpose at all but....

Why so anti? Cats wear collars all the time and they climb, explore, squeeze into all sorts of nooks and crannies....I can't see how a cat is any less likely to get caught up than a rabbit. They actually have far more opportunity to get snagged than the average bun, just based on their wider variety of encounters in their habitat. If a rabbit got used to a collar as a baby and wore one continuously, they would not be distressed by it. The only thing I have seen so far that would be a major issue would be the inclination for their bunny companion to chew it....but that would just make it a practical issue not a moral issue.

I just wondered why there is such a vehement reaction to this, especially the 'immoral' comment? I have four cats, none of which wear collars as they are indoor cats and are all microchipped but if they were outdoor cats, they would have collars for ID purposes, just to make it quicker to relocate them if lost or, god forbid, injured or killed on the road. My choice for them to go collarless is mainly an aesthetic one....I think they look much nicer without collars and the microchip will do the job in the unlikley event of them getting out of the house and getting lost.

I can understand people saying a collar on a rabbit would look wrong or is unnecessary due to the unlikelihood of needing it for ID but cannot quite get my head round the 'it's terribly dangerous or immoral' points?

Don't jump on me, this is a curiosity, not a criticism of any kind but I am interested in the 'back up' for your opinions xxx :D

My two indoor cats wear collars with ID tags on. My kitten wasnt keen at first, but soon got used to it and is 100% not bothered by a collar.

As I said, I tried one on my rabbit for a selfish reason of that I wanted to be able to hear a bell where he was. He bit it, scratched it and hated it very clearly, so I took it off. He acted no where near like how my kitten did.

I see a need for collars on cats, but I see no need for them on rabbits, which is another reason I think they are cruel. They are pureply for humans sake, unlike my cats collars which have ID and contact details on if they were to get lost.

Captain Helen
23-08-2011, 11:32 AM
i dont like collars on any animals :(

Ralph our dog only wears one when he is out and that is because i need to put him on a lead :(, in the house it comes off straight away.

ive seen a cat walking with a collar half round its neck and half round its leg because its somehow got caught and tried to escape, infact Ste's mom adopted a cat that was abandoned and the collar had caused him horrific injuries by the time he was found :cry: :cry:

i think they are horrible things :evil:

I agree. Collars on rabbits are pointless, and none of my cats wear collars either. I've seen cats at the RSPCA with horrendous injuries caused by collars. :( I just couldn't risk it. Microchipping is so much better.

chul
23-08-2011, 11:33 AM
i dont like collars on any animals :(

Ralph our dog only wears one when he is out and that is because i need to put him on a lead :(, in the house it comes off straight away.

ive seen a cat walking with a collar half round its neck and half round its leg because its somehow got caught and tried to escape, infact Ste's mom adopted a cat that was abandoned and the collar had caused him horrific injuries by the time he was found :cry: :cry:

i think they are horrible things :evil:

I think non-safety collars on cats are evil, but none of these problems are usually caused by safety collars.

thenamesJT
23-08-2011, 11:34 AM
i dont like collars on any animals :(

Ralph our dog only wears one when he is out and that is because i need to put him on a lead :(, in the house it comes off straight away.

ive seen a cat walking with a collar half round its neck and half round its leg because its somehow got caught and tried to escape, infact Ste's mom adopted a cat that was abandoned and the collar had caused him horrific injuries by the time he was found :cry: :cry:

i think they are horrible things :evil:


Ive never bought any of my dogs a collar, they all have rope leads.....which are pink obviously. ;)

GrahamL
23-08-2011, 11:36 AM
I am entirely playing devil's advocate here as I have not and do not intend to put a collar on my buns as it would serve no purpose at all but....

Why so anti? Cats wear collars all the time and they climb, explore, squeeze into all sorts of nooks and crannies....I can't see how a cat is any less likely to get caught up than a rabbit. They actually have far more opportunity to get snagged than the average bun, just based on their wider variety of encounters in their habitat. If a rabbit got used to a collar as a baby and wore one continuously, they would not be distressed by it. The only thing I have seen so far that would be a major issue would be the inclination for their bunny companion to chew it....but that would just make it a practical issue not a moral issue.

I just wondered why there is such a vehement reaction to this, especially the 'immoral' comment? I have four cats, none of which wear collars as they are indoor cats and are all microchipped but if they were outdoor cats, they would have collars for ID purposes, just to make it quicker to relocate them if lost or, god forbid, injured or killed on the road. My choice for them to go collarless is mainly an aesthetic one....I think they look much nicer without collars and the microchip will do the job in the unlikley event of them getting out of the house and getting lost.

I can understand people saying a collar on a rabbit would look wrong or is unnecessary due to the unlikelihood of needing it for ID but cannot quite get my head round the 'it's terribly dangerous or immoral' points?

Don't jump on me, this is a curiosity, not a criticism of any kind but I am interested in the 'back up' for your opinions xxx :D

I do like to have a sensible, adult debate, so there is absolutely no way that i would jump on you for this post :)

With cats and dogs, i believe they are suited, as for ID purposes, and for attaching a lead (in a dogs purpose) - i understand that microchipping does away with part of the need for the ID part, but that requires getting the cat/dog to a vet with chip scanners. If someone was to find your cat / dog wandering and it had ID on the collar - then it can be identified more readily :) Which is great for both Dog/Cat and Owner.

With rabbits, they've got no need for this. Rabbits aren't like dogs and cats, they have a much more 'wild' behaviour etc. They don't so much act like a dog and cat and 'live with' a human. They live with humans because its forced upon them to be in their environment. A rabbit does all kind of odd movements (think of a binky) where a collar could be extremely restrictive and could infact cause harm. The way a rabbits body is designed is not conjucive to wearing a collar .

I know im not very elequent at getting my point across, but i hope that kinda worked :lol:

Pebblesetc
23-08-2011, 11:45 AM
I don't like collars on any animals (except for dogs on walkies). Even so-called "safety" collars are essentially a death trap. I've come home from school to find my cat (who had been wearing a "safety" collar) swinging by his neck from a tree in our garden. Fortunately he hadn't been there too long and was still alive. But after that experience, no collars. Ever. On any animal.

Unless of course there are circumstances such as, the previous owner has been reluctant to change over microchip details. In which case a collar on a cat is ok, as its temporary. Other than that I'd be too frightened to allow my cat to have a collar put on him.

donnamt
23-08-2011, 11:47 AM
Ive never bought any of my dogs a collar, they all have rope leads.....which are pink obviously. ;)

Ste never even used to use a lead, Ralph is almost deaf now so i cant trust him offlead, we have a harness but it takes hours to put on and poor Ralph just looks so sad as i fiddle about :lol:

*off to look at what a rope lead is*

Captain Helen
23-08-2011, 11:48 AM
I don't like collars on any animals (except for dogs on walkies). Even so-called "safety" collars are essentially a death trap. I've come home from school to find my cat (who had been wearing a "safety" collar) swinging by his neck from a tree in our garden. Fortunately he hadn't been there too long and was still alive. But after that experience, no collars. Ever. On any animal.

Unless of course there are circumstances such as, the previous owner has been reluctant to change over microchip details. In which case a collar on a cat is ok, as its temporary. Other than that I'd be too frightened to allow my cat to have a collar put on him.

:shock: That must have been awful! :cry: Thank god you got there in time and he was OK xx

CharlieBabbit
23-08-2011, 11:49 AM
I'd say that was very eloquent hon :D And thank you everyone for realising I wasn't criticising....just interested. I guess I can see the point about thin skin...it is quite remarkable how paper thin rabbit skin is, isn't it? You'd have thought a prey animal would have evolved a better defence!

I also totally agree that rabbits do not have the 'domestication' of a dog or cat and are therefore much more naturally wary and 'flighty' so maybe this could be a heightened risk. I have however, seen my cats regularly do the equivalent of a binky...we call them 'scat attacks' so there is a similar potential for risk there maybe??? ;)

I don't actually like collars on any animal either and have avoided their use on my indoor cats based on the far lower likelihood of them being needed for ID. I too have seen some horrific injuries caused by collars but as mentioned, these are usually 'fixed' collars rather than safety collars but none-the-less, a reasoned argument.

Hmmmm, food for thought ;)

*lily*
23-08-2011, 11:52 AM
i dont like collars on any animals :(

Ralph our dog only wears one when he is out and that is because i need to put him on a lead :(, in the house it comes off straight away.

ive seen a cat walking with a collar half round its neck and half round its leg because its somehow got caught and tried to escape, infact Ste's mom adopted a cat that was abandoned and the collar had caused him horrific injuries by the time he was found :cry: :cry:

i think they are horrible things :evil:

My Barney was found with just such an injury it was touch and go whether he would have to be PTS as the injury was so far under his armpit, amputation wasn't an option.

The Cats Protection rescued him and started treatment on his leg which we carried on when we adopted him. We had to use a cream several times a day and it did heal completely.

Molly doesn't wear a collar and Louie, well the thought has never even crossed my mind!

Mischief and Tinker's Mum
23-08-2011, 12:01 PM
My cat is microchipped but he used to wear a collar, a snap off one. He lost it in a few months, bought him another but he lost it in a day. :lol: He doesn't wear one now but I prefer it when he has one because he looks more like he belongs. If he got lost, people might automatically think he's a stray because he has no collar and they might not think about checking for a microchip. :? He doesn't wear one now so oh well.

missFloppyears
23-08-2011, 01:06 PM
i understand the need for dogs they are far more prone to roam, i was a complete moron once and use a rope lead for my old dog who pulled on it so strong he choked himself. ill never use one again theyre horrid.:evil:


anyhooo i cant imagine trying to put a collar on poppet she is always getting into nooks and crannies:shock:

CazScho
23-08-2011, 01:12 PM
My two indoor cats wear collars with ID tags on. My kitten wasnt keen at first, but soon got used to it and is 100% not bothered by a collar.



I'm just being curious, but as your cats are indoor, why do they have ID tags? Is it in case they do get out, or in case they go out in the future?

emjrabbitwolf
23-08-2011, 01:20 PM
I'm the one with rabbits wearing collars.

Both Ben and Jeri wear fully elasticated kitten collars which have the most delicate quick release buckles I've seen. Neither bother to chew them or anything, and I make sure that as with dogs/cats I can get fingers between the collar and their neck.

I check regularly to see if there's any rubbing or anything, but so far nothing, and as the collars fly open at the slightest stretch they don't hurt or damage their necks. I know this from Ben getting his caught on me once and merely turning round and it coming off.

I have collars om them for a reason; the bells. Ben is an escape artist and a vanisher. He ends up in the strangest of places and can escape from the kitchen if people are well people. He's such a sneak! Without the bell we'd have NO idea where he was most of the time.

Bunnies are microchipped, but with Ben being wild coloured not everyone would think he's a pet, so the collar also acts as a flag should he ever get out the front door (true me he's tried!)

Those are my reasons. Both my current rabbits and previous rabbits wore collars for locationing purposes. I don't like the idea of sparkly cute looking collars, harnesses, costumes etc as they aren't practical, but the nice soft sensative collars work for me.

You can judge me if you like, but I also hope you can see my reasoning behind using them. Its for safety not fashion.

CharlieBabbit
23-08-2011, 01:26 PM
I can see the logic in your decision and it obviously works for you and for all the right reasons. I don't think anyone should criticise that x

chul
23-08-2011, 01:53 PM
I'm just being curious, but as your cats are indoor, why do they have ID tags? Is it in case they do get out, or in case they go out in the future?

It is just incase they get out. Miggy has 'escaped' through a window once, and as they aren't yet micro chipped, I like collars on them.

emjrabbitwolf
23-08-2011, 02:09 PM
I can see the logic in your decision and it obviously works for you and for all the right reasons. I don't think anyone should criticise that x

Thank you. Ben and Jeri are both very curious about things, namely the front door! So knowing they are coming up behind me means I can be ready to nudge them away.
We also have a cat who wears a collar proclaiming she's microchipped which is in case she ever gets out (which she has done a few times) as we keep her as a house cat since we live not too far from one of the busy roads in the village. Evie unlike Ben and Jeri doesn't like being on a harness and lead so I can't take her for a turn round the garden like I do with the rabbits.

loppy ears
23-08-2011, 02:10 PM
My boy has a natural collar :lol: his fur markings make him look like he is wearing a collar sometimes.

Collars can be dangerous, I only use them when animals are supervised

VickiP
23-08-2011, 05:33 PM
Thank you. Ben and Jeri are both very curious about things, namely the front door! So knowing they are coming up behind me means I can be ready to nudge them away.
We also have a cat who wears a collar proclaiming she's microchipped which is in case she ever gets out (which she has done a few times) as we keep her as a house cat since we live not too far from one of the busy roads in the village. Evie unlike Ben and Jeri doesn't like being on a harness and lead so I can't take her for a turn round the garden like I do with the rabbits.

:wave: I'm assuming you put a harness on them to go round the garden rather than attaching a lead to the collar? Whilst I can see your reasoning and understand it I personally would look at other options to make them safe in preference to the collar still, I can see how the bell works but you have to remember that their hearing is very sensitive, as prey animals they rely on certain senses far more than we do and a bell ringing everytime you move is essentially quite annoying, I appreciate they accept it but that doesnt equate to them not minding it, I bet they prefer it when the collars are off, im assuming you let them have some time off the bell ringing to binky about etc? I'm very much into creating as close to natural existence for my pets and I know if I attempted to put a collar let alone with a jingle bell on it they'd rip them off each other in a flash, I'd estimate the collars lifespan on my rabbits to be less than 5 mins but then I'd not have it any over way :wave:

VickiP
23-08-2011, 05:35 PM
^ other - can't edit on my phone

Alibunmum
23-08-2011, 05:42 PM
There are two main reasons why they shouldn't wear collars.

They have a much more fragile skeleton than cats and dogs so if they get caught they are at far more risk of serious injury.

Being prey animals they are extremely prone to high stress. If they get caught the stress of being stuck could kill them before any injury does. Cats and dogs are not as prone to problems with stressful situations given they are predators.

xx-snowball-xx
23-08-2011, 05:52 PM
I'm the one with rabbits wearing collars.

Both Ben and Jeri wear fully elasticated kitten collars which have the most delicate quick release buckles I've seen. Neither bother to chew them or anything, and I make sure that as with dogs/cats I can get fingers between the collar and their neck.

I check regularly to see if there's any rubbing or anything, but so far nothing, and as the collars fly open at the slightest stretch they don't hurt or damage their necks. I know this from Ben getting his caught on me once and merely turning round and it coming off.

I have collars om them for a reason; the bells. Ben is an escape artist and a vanisher. He ends up in the strangest of places and can escape from the kitchen if people are well people. He's such a sneak! Without the bell we'd have NO idea where he was most of the time.

Bunnies are microchipped, but with Ben being wild coloured not everyone would think he's a pet, so the collar also acts as a flag should he ever get out the front door (true me he's tried!)

Those are my reasons. Both my current rabbits and previous rabbits wore collars for locationing purposes. I don't like the idea of sparkly cute looking collars, harnesses, costumes etc as they aren't practical, but the nice soft sensative collars work for me.

You can judge me if you like, but I also hope you can see my reasoning behind using them. Its for safety not fashion.


If I recall correctly from previous posts, they DID mind the collars at first though didn't they?
And you just kept on going and kept trying until they accepted them?