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View Full Version : Taking your rabbit to another vet for second opinion...



susie bun
05-02-2011, 02:11 PM
As many of you know I have been concerned about Spenser's eating. His vet has assured me he is fine, and he is certainly not behaving like an unwell rabbit other than by very selective eating. I really like Spenser's vet, and she did examine him very carefully last week. She said he was a good size, which suggests he is getting enough to eat. If I do decide it is necessary, how do you go about seeking a second opinion.

Bunny Buddy
05-02-2011, 02:22 PM
As many of you know I have been concerned about Spenser's eating. His vet has assured me he is fine, and he is certainly not behaving like an unwell rabbit other than by very selective eating. I really like Spenser's vet, and she did examine him very carefully last week. She said he was a good size, which suggests he is getting enough to eat. If I do decide it is necessary, how do you go about seeking a second opinion.

Just seek out another vet, recommendations on somebody rabbit savvy would be useful and then book a consultation. I'd be totally upfront with the new vet about what you are doing and why.

I had a similar situation with Esme. She went for a spay and stopped breathing when put under anaesthetic. The original vet didn't want to try again, I wanted her spayed if at all possible. I decided to consult FHB, I just booked, turned up and explained. I know the original vet is really good as are a lot of his colleagues but I just felt I needed more expert opinion. (Esme was spayed with no problem). I've ended up mainly using the rabbit savvy vets, not because there's anything wrong with the others just that 'the best' is only 20 miles away - so why not.

I'd definitely seek a second opinion in your case, even if just for peace of mind.

VickiP
05-02-2011, 02:34 PM
I think it's worth being careful, vets generally won't go against each other much like GP's - it's not professional and they will need to contact your existing vet for his notes / history, if your really concerned about it then you must do it but, be careful about your reason for doing it, maybe say it's easier to get to or something like that - either way your still getting a second opinion if you say that you'd like to discuss the treatment he's had and whether or not there is anything that's been missed. It sounds like Spenser is OK though what do you think has been missed?

susie bun
05-02-2011, 02:46 PM
I don't know how to do a link to the thread, but a few people think that Spenser may have hidden dental issues that would only show up under GA. His vet felt all round his mouth and looked at his eyes, as well as in his mouth with the light thing. I think I will take her advice and call them back in the first instance if he is still as fussy in a couple of weeks. I actually quite respect her for not giving him a prescription she felt sure he didn't need and would only cause him stress.

Santa
05-02-2011, 02:48 PM
I would just be up front with your vet and say that you are still concerned that there is something going on, and ask for a second opinion - this can either be another vet at the same practice, or, with their consent, taking the bun somewhere else. This is different to a referral; a second opinion is simply getting another vet to examine the animal and say what they think - whereas a referral (which is usually more expensive) actually refers the animal's care to another more experienced/specialised vet for treatment for something.

I would still lay money on the fact that there's something up with his teeth that can't be seen without GA and might be resolvable if the teeth are thoroughly checked while neutering if that's something you're still planning for fairly soon. Santa regularly (as in about fortnightly) used to go to the vets with her snuffles and her teeth were checked every time, but it was only when she went under GA for a dental that the vet discovered a spur had grown right out sideways into her cheek - there's no way that could have been seen on a conscious rabbit. Changes in eating habits are usually a giveaway for a dental problem as different foods feel different in the mouth so sometimes one type or another makes it feel odd/hurts and another doesn't.

Personally I would be worried about leaving it for another couple of weeks to see how he goes, because if there's enough of an irritation that he's being selective with food now, if it is his teeth, as they continue to grow, he could suddenly crash and go into stasis, and then you'd be in the situation of needing to have an emergency GA on an already unwell bunny :?

Good luck x

bunlover
05-02-2011, 02:53 PM
i would just go to new trustworthy vet and say, hi im coming to you for a second opinion, have seen my own vet previously and they werent sure whata was causing the issue can you see what you think ?

loppy ears
05-02-2011, 04:01 PM
Vets will tell other vets what you have said, so be aware of this, and you may not be able to go back to your old vet if in the end you prefer them.

Some people do seem to use more than one vet though, but they most likely do not say anything bad about the other vets, the problem is though if one vet starts treatment you would have to continue going I would think as it could be harmful to receive treatment from two different surgerys.

Are there other vets at your surgery? I would be honest with your vet, she may ask one of the partners to have a look at Spenser if she feels you think that she is missing something.

poppymoon
05-02-2011, 04:03 PM
I researched a rabbit vet for Eric as i knew he wasn't right even though he was receiving treatment from 2 vets at the same practise.

I'm so glad I followed my gut instinct or my little man would not be here with me now.

poppymoon
05-02-2011, 04:06 PM
Forgot to add, new vet obviously contacted old vet for Eric's records but there was no animosity towards us. That would be rather unprofessional! I did find however that the 2 vets at the same practice were unlikely to go against what a colleague was recommending.

Bunny Buddy
05-02-2011, 04:30 PM
I think it's worth being careful, vets generally won't go against each other much like GP's - it's not professional and they will need to contact your existing vet for his notes / history, if your really concerned about it then you must do it but, be careful about your reason for doing it, maybe say it's easier to get to or something like that - either way your still getting a second opinion if you say that you'd like to discuss the treatment he's had and whether or not there is anything that's been missed. It sounds like Spenser is OK though what do you think has been missed?

I can't see why a vet or GP wouldn't give a different opinion to a colleague if the colleague has missed something or simply doesn't have the expertise to have seen/suspect something. I'd consider it more unprofessional not to speak up/be thorough than to say nothing for the sake of a colleague's reputation (risking their own reputation in doing so). If you've given the first practitioner several opportunities to find something and they haven't and you're still convinced/concerned then I think it's perfectly reasonable to seek out a second opinion, as long as it's done in a tactful manner.

loppy ears
05-02-2011, 04:37 PM
I can't see why a vet or GP wouldn't give a different opinion to a colleague if the colleague has missed something or simply doesn't have the expertise to have seen/suspect something. I'd consider it more unprofessional not to speak up/be thorough than to say nothing for the sake of a colleague's reputation (risking their own reputation in doing so). If you've given the first practitioner several opportunities to find something and they haven't and you're still convinced/concerned then I think it's perfectly reasonable to seek out a second opinion, as long as it's done in a tactful manner.

The vets at my practice are happy for a colleague to take a look at a patient and will offer new advice and recommendations, they work as a team and draw on each others experience, they are not afraid to offer a different opinion either.

Sky-O
05-02-2011, 04:49 PM
With Badger I knew he wasn't right and what they were saying or suggesting wasn't right and just kept saying he isn't ok is there anything else you can do. We saw three different vets at the practice because I was getting a lot of last minute or emergency appointments. The last one said that he didn't think there was anything else they could do, especially as I had no more suggestions, and then he said he would make some enquiries and refer me for an exotics opinion.

The first time I did this I wasn't seeking a second opinion as such, just looking for a decent vet, and was very careful with what I said at that appointment. I have since told my vet the full truth of why I moved practices because we both knwo each other now.

I would suggest just keep taking Spenser back, explain that he isn't ok and you're not sure what to do and ask them if they will do a GA and x-ray his skull and check his teeth. You can ask if they are not sure, if they can refer him on to someone else with an exotics specialism.

Its not cross questioning the vet and the vet shouldn't have a problem with it and should also realise its nothing personal to them. You have to fight for Spenser because no one else can. A secure vet will back you with that all the way.

Blackberry & Co
05-02-2011, 05:55 PM
The vets at my practice are happy for a colleague to take a look at a patient and will offer new advice and recommendations, they work as a team and draw on each others experience, they are not afraid to offer a different opinion either.

With our dog, Louis, and his various lung problems our vet will tell us that she discusses his case with colleagues and they suggest different ideas for his treatment. It's nice to know they want the best for him.

KarenM
05-02-2011, 05:58 PM
I can't see why a vet or GP wouldn't give a different opinion to a colleague if the colleague has missed something or simply doesn't have the expertise to have seen/suspect something. I'd consider it more unprofessional not to speak up/be thorough than to say nothing for the sake of a colleague's reputation (risking their own reputation in doing so). If you've given the first practitioner several opportunities to find something and they haven't and you're still convinced/concerned then I think it's perfectly reasonable to seek out a second opinion, as long as it's done in a tactful manner.

:thumb: I agree. :D

There's not really any point in calling it a second opinion otherwise, if the 2nd person is just going to agree with the first. :?

poppymoon
05-02-2011, 09:12 PM
:thumb: I agree. :D

There's not really any point in calling it a second opinion otherwise, if the 2nd person is just going to agree with the first. :?

i think the issue i had at my original vets was that none of them had a clue - so they all agreed rather than be totally radical and try something else as what they had done was not helping eric:roll:

thankfully i have a fab vet now:D

KarenM
05-02-2011, 09:21 PM
i think the issue i had at my original vets was that none of them had a clue - so they all agreed rather than be totally radical and try something else as what they had done was not helping eric:roll:

:roll: Thankfully Eric has a better vet now. :love:

I can see that it's more of a potential problem if you're seeking a 2nd opinion from another vet at the same practice as the first, although it still shouldn't be happening. It definitely shouldn't be an issue if you go to another vet though.

bensonlola
06-02-2011, 09:27 AM
I've emailed you my tuppence worth!! :wave:

Hugo's There
06-02-2011, 10:55 AM
When we were not happy with our vets treatment of Harvey we went to a vet further afield and didn't mention that we were registered with another vet. Rightly or wrongly, this vet gave him the dental treatment we felt he needed and which our vet wouldn't do. Now we take all our most complex cases to the hospital where there is a vet who specialises in bunnies and just use our local vet for the more routine stuff.

Just to add we do not have individual bunnies registered at 2 vets, just that some are registered locally and some at the hospital. wanted to make that clear :)

louise and Gus
06-02-2011, 11:04 AM
I have taken bunnies who have been 'treated' at another vet to my vet because they were not getting the appropriate treatment, I have always been open about why I am doing this is the original vets and my vet. There has never been any problem at all. I would just book an appointment with a rabbit savvy vet and explain to the vet while you are there, without bad mouthing your current vet as that will not help :)

Fluffers
06-02-2011, 11:25 AM
A second opinion is always worth having. You have nothing to lose and everything to gain. At the very least, peace of mind :wave:

Don't feel awkward or uncomfortable about it, vets are VERY used to this, it happens all the time. It only feels strange to you because you're in a different environment to them & Spenser is your first pet.

You won't upset the lady vet that saw Spenser, they expect people to have second opinions but if you feel happier going elsewhere & not mentioning it to the first vet then do that :wave: You can still go back to her for routine stuff like his vaccinations etc :D

Snowberry
06-02-2011, 11:39 AM
When Snowdrop was really poorly I felt our vet didnt have the knowledge to investigate the problem properly. Having already lost Graham with her under GA I wasnt happy about her performing another GA on a rabbit of mine and so asked her if she would reffer us to a specialist. I looked up FHB, gave the phone number to my vet and said could she sort out a referral to there for me.

She did it with no problem at all.