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CinnamonAndNutmeg!
05-01-2011, 05:13 PM
A teacher brought up the conversation not long ago, and said 'Animals dont have emotions, they do things for food..'
Now this is a lady, owns two dogs and a cat.
I argued with her (and nearly caught myself a detention) because:

1. If animals only show affection towards us because they know we give them food, then why do they protect us when we are in danger?
and why do they grieve over the friends they have lost?

Please tell me im right in thinking they do have emotions...

Sky-O
05-01-2011, 05:14 PM
I think they do. I think a binky shows that, and grieving for a lost friend.

They don't have them in the same way we do, but they have some emotional experiences, for sure.

rabbitmum
05-01-2011, 05:16 PM
OF COURSE THEY DO:roll: ours show happiness ,when they get fed....annoyance , about me hoovering:roll: etc
if thats not showing emotion what is?:?:roll:

wally4eva
05-01-2011, 05:16 PM
I think they do. I think a binky shows that, and grieving for a lost friend.

They don't have them in the same way we do, but they have some emotional experiences, for sure.

Couldn't have said it any better:D

Buuny_Friend
05-01-2011, 05:16 PM
I truly 100% believe that animals have emotions.

Fear is an emotion and animals certainly feel that!

VickyC83
05-01-2011, 05:16 PM
I think they do. I think a binky shows that, and grieving for a lost friend.

They don't have them in the same way we do, but they have some emotional experiences, for sure.

Hear hear! :)

chloemurray
05-01-2011, 05:17 PM
I definitely think they have "feelings", and that they do have emotions in some sort of way..

I saw an amazing thing where some zoologists proved that chimps have, and can recognise, emotions. It was really incredible:)

CinnamonAndNutmeg!
05-01-2011, 05:18 PM
OF COURSE THEY DO:roll: ours show happiness ,when they get fed....annoyance , about me hoovering:roll: etc
if thats not showing emotion what is?:?:roll:

Exactly!!
She made it sound like they were robots, and i think she even said 'They basically eat and drink... thats all they care about'
i'd of carried on arguing, but the fact that there was a detention on sale made me shut up!

CinnamonAndNutmeg!
05-01-2011, 05:20 PM
I think they do. I think a binky shows that, and grieving for a lost friend.

They don't have them in the same way we do, but they have some emotional experiences, for sure.

i think i might bring these points up again, even if i do get a detention...
Thanks guys:wave:

beckie20
05-01-2011, 05:21 PM
Course they do. Perhaps not as developed and complex as adult emotions... I reckon their like small children in terms of their emotions.

LilVicky
05-01-2011, 05:22 PM
I completely agree that they do have emotions.

All animals do! Happy, Sad, Angry, they may not show it the way we do but they still have them

bunnylover177
05-01-2011, 05:28 PM
Animals are mammals. So are we. They have the same sort of pain and pleasure centers in brain as us (we have much bigger cerbral cortex of course). Emotions are centered on the more primitive parts of the brain - since our brains function in the same way it is reasonable to assume they feel emotions. I'm trying to remember all this from a book by Temple Granger called something like: How to make animals happy - I think that is the gist of it :)

iloveraisinandrocky
05-01-2011, 05:28 PM
Absoloutly! They sahow lots of emotion especially when they are happy! Mine love to binky!

Heather&Bart-MyLittleBuns
05-01-2011, 05:32 PM
Of course! Surely she must at least realise that animals feel fear?! :?:roll:

William
05-01-2011, 05:35 PM
of course they do. they aren't robots. like someone else said, i imagine their emotions are like a young child. not as complex as ours.

Suzanne
05-01-2011, 08:10 PM
All animals show emotions. Elephants are amazing examples of how emotional an animal can be.

Azraelm
05-01-2011, 08:19 PM
What a fool :roll: It's not even a debate- of COURSE they do. There's vast evidence to support it- and it's obvious! Why do we think we're so superior to every other being?

Crunchie
05-01-2011, 08:21 PM
I think things like rabbits certainly do, even goldfish have been known to be able to recognise their owners. I had the same argument with someone not that long ago and said to him that many many animals are very clearly capable of distress and fear that much is well documented. I can't see why they wouldn't be capable of other emotions as well (at the other end of the scale hopefully).

What else is a binky if not an expression of happiness? It's a total waste of energy and it's not like it's being used as a signal to other rabbits or a means of getting food. Honey was doing mad wee binkies today actually then looked sort of shocked like she couldn't believe she'd be so undignified.:lol:

helgalush
05-01-2011, 08:22 PM
Fear is an emotion - animals get scared. Happiness is an emotion - my animals show me this everyday.

My pair are attached to each other and love each other - they show this in ways that are completely unrelated to food or any other form of 'reward' ie Muesli will groom Starbuck's eyes even though he hardly ever gets any grooming back.

etc etc.

Your teacher is wrong, sorry.

mini lop1
05-01-2011, 08:26 PM
i believe they do, maybe in different ways to us, but they still have emotions, my first therapist tried to go over my views and said they don;t we just humanise them, but she wasn't an animal lover anyway soo how would she understand, my new psychologist believes they do too, as she has cats

Jaysmonkey
05-01-2011, 08:29 PM
Of course they do!

Bink
05-01-2011, 08:41 PM
Today, when taking George and Fifi for their myxi boosters, they both clambered into the safety of my and my mums arms.

I agree with what the majority have said, the emotions are on a different level to ours, but they are definitely there, without a doubt.

BinkyBun
05-01-2011, 08:44 PM
I absolutely believe animals have emotions.

helgalush
05-01-2011, 08:49 PM
i believe they do, maybe in different ways to us, but they still have emotions, my first therapist tried to go over my views and said they don;t we just humanise them, but she wasn't an animal lover anyway soo how would she understand, my new psychologist believes they do too, as she has cats

thats so strange isnt it? I know some psychologists can be very "science" focussed, but surely they are all about feelings? :? After all, we are animals too? Sounds like your current therapist is a lot more.....human?! :oops:

Milo+Fizz
05-01-2011, 08:57 PM
Animals do have emotions! http://www.mentalfloss.com/blogs/archives/40324 :love:

littleboots
05-01-2011, 09:13 PM
Definatley have emotions!
And I also really believe they pick up on our emotions too!

beckie20
05-01-2011, 09:16 PM
Definatley have emotions!
And I also really believe they pick up on our emotions too!

I agree with that too.

My cat can tell when I'm upset, as she just sits with me, rather than demands my attention with her claws like she does the rest of the time :lol:

stargrrlclaire
05-01-2011, 09:25 PM
trust me, they have emotions. my ruby died today and her best friend maggie-may showed anger and shock, she was most definately grieving and that's an emotion, she was so very sad.:cry::cry:

littleboots
05-01-2011, 09:27 PM
trust me, they have emotions. my ruby died today and her best friend maggie-may showed anger and shock, she was most definately grieving and that's an emotion, she was so very sad.:cry::cry:

Oh.. so very sorry:(

Mischief and Tinker's Mum
05-01-2011, 09:34 PM
Of course they do and I have first hand proof...

My guinea pigs were both 5 years old, almost 6 when they both passed away just half an hour between each other on 2nd December. :cry: When Fudge was ill, her sister, Rainbow looked after her and wouldn't leave her side, that is love! :love: Rainbow passed away un expectedly, we think it was because of a heart attack. :cry: She was dying and there wass nothing me and my mum could do, she was going, she was all floppy and lifeless :cry: So we made her comfortable and within a minute she was gone. :cry: Her ill sister Fudge who was snuggled up by her side on a blanket had been struggling to walk but as soon as Rainbow had gone, we knew because Fudge came waddling up to me and climbed onto my lap. :cry: She knew her sister had gone and she was coming to me for comfort I believe. I loved her and she was showing that love back. :love: Not long after, Fudge passed away in my arms peacefully. My girls were so lovely and I miss them so much and yes they did have emotions as do all my pets. xx

William
06-01-2011, 08:39 AM
trust me, they have emotions. my ruby died today and her best friend maggie-may showed anger and shock, she was most definately grieving and that's an emotion, she was so very sad.:cry::cry:

My duck Dill greived when her friend, Will, died :cry: She laid by his side for 12 hours until I finally took his body.

Zahirre
06-01-2011, 08:45 AM
Teachers aren't always right and they shouldn't pressume to be either. Part of being a teacher is letting students voice their own opinions and formulate ideas on subjects of interest. She shouldn't have brought a detention up for you simply voicing your opinion on the subject.
Animals do have emotions, in my opinion. They show love, compassion, fear and many other emotions quite clearly.
They may not smile, laugh, cry or scream like humans but there is definetely something there.

GrahamL
06-01-2011, 09:00 AM
Teachers aren't always right and they shouldn't pressume to be either. Part of being a teacher is letting students voice their own opinions and formulate ideas on subjects of interest. She shouldn't have brought a detention up for you simply voicing your opinion on the subject.
Animals do have emotions, in my opinion. They show love, compassion, fear and many other emotions quite clearly.
They may not smile, laugh, cry or scream like humans but there is definetely something there.

:thumb:

Great post.

Biscuit grooms me and my OH, thats affection a clear display of an emotion.

Rabbits stamp at disgust/fear/anger. Again, all emotions.

Sky-O's binky analagy is exactly an emotional response and you don't see binkys from 'unhappy' rabbits, which in itself is an emotion.

You're teacher is obviously not very open minded, to bring up the idea of detention for you disagreeing with them is totally disgusting. You should be able to voice an opinion at any time. An opinion is exactly that.

VickiP
06-01-2011, 10:46 AM
Haven't read all the thread but, I do think animals clearly have emotions there is no doubt in my mind they experience a whole range of emotions like happiness, sadness, love, fear, terror, grief etc the list in endless, the only one I'm not sure about is guilt - not sure they have the capacity to feel guilty??:? Which actually isn't a bad thing :lol:

Tuckerbunnies
06-01-2011, 10:47 AM
Animals certainly do have emotions :D

William
06-01-2011, 10:55 AM
Haven't read all the thread but, I do think animals clearly have emotions there is no doubt in my mind they experience a whole range of emotions like happiness, sadness, love, fear, terror, grief etc the list in endless, the only one I'm not sure about is guilt - not sure they have the capacity to feel guilty??:? Which actually isn't a bad thing :lol:

Yep, even jealousy. I wonder about embarrassment? I've seen cats act embarrassed, I think. Not sure about guilty. I always thought my lab acted guilty when she'd have an accident on the floor as a puppy. Before we even found out she was acting guilty, just laying down and she'd put her tail between her legs and act really sad. :lol: She hated having accidents. Though I suppose she might just have known we'd be upset and so she felt upset.

KoShiatar
09-01-2011, 10:10 AM
Exactly!!
She made it sound like they were robots, and i think she even said 'They basically eat and drink... thats all they care about'
i'd of carried on arguing, but the fact that there was a detention on sale made me shut up!

That theory on animal behavior is obsolete by now and I can't believe there's still people - and pet owners, too! - who still go by it!
http://www.amazon.com/Alex-Me-Scientist-Uncovered-Intelligence/dp/0061672475
I suggest that you gift/suggest this book to your teacher. It's about the famous grey parrot Alex.
While Alex was able to do several things in order to get food, he also learned how to use words to express feelings - for example, he knew that "I'm sorry" could express the intention to end a conflict or an unpleasant situation, and used it profusely when he didn't want to be left alone at the vet's. :lol:
This is just a small example though. After reading this book, I'm more and more convinced that the line between man and animal is blurred, not sharp.

thumps_
09-01-2011, 02:50 PM
That's an excellent book Koshiatar. Fascinating, sound reading. I couldn't put it down.

My rabbit has such intense feelings that when I once stayed out all night, but returned before normal getting up time, his tummy stopped working with distress. He's fine if I'm out all day or into the small hours. I just have to be home by about 3.00am. There was plenty of food available for him.

Just because they don't express emotions like we do, with tears or facial muscles, & mostly can't speak, does NOT mean they don't have emotions. They express themselves very effectively in other ways.

I now know how Thumper is feeling by looking at him, but it took me time to understand him.

Captain Helen
09-01-2011, 03:11 PM
Teachers aren't always right and they shouldn't pressume to be either. Part of being a teacher is letting students voice their own opinions and formulate ideas on subjects of interest. She shouldn't have brought a detention up for you simply voicing your opinion on the subject.
Animals do have emotions, in my opinion. They show love, compassion, fear and many other emotions quite clearly.
They may not smile, laugh, cry or scream like humans but there is definetely something there.

Very well said. I completely agree. :wave:

Gemmapookie
09-01-2011, 03:30 PM
Animals definatly have emotions, and if you are in tune with your pets you can tell easily their mood.
Ive definatly seen an embarrassed cat on more than one occasion :lol:

CinnamonAndNutmeg!
09-01-2011, 03:42 PM
Of course they do and I have first hand proof...

My guinea pigs were both 5 years old, almost 6 when they both passed away just half an hour between each other on 2nd December. :cry: When Fudge was ill, her sister, Rainbow looked after her and wouldn't leave her side, that is love! :love: Rainbow passed away un expectedly, we think it was because of a heart attack. :cry: She was dying and there wass nothing me and my mum could do, she was going, she was all floppy and lifeless :cry: So we made her comfortable and within a minute she was gone. :cry: Her ill sister Fudge who was snuggled up by her side on a blanket had been struggling to walk but as soon as Rainbow had gone, we knew because Fudge came waddling up to me and climbed onto my lap. :cry: She knew her sister had gone and she was coming to me for comfort I believe. I loved her and she was showing that love back. :love: Not long after, Fudge passed away in my arms peacefully. My girls were so lovely and I miss them so much and yes they did have emotions as do all my pets. xx

Thats lovely...:love:
Im going to bring it up tomorrow in class again...