PDA

View Full Version : What does lack of space DO to a bun?



Hoppit!
19-03-2010, 01:22 PM
I'm writing reviews on tiny hutches and runs now, to point out why they aren't so good and maybe stop a few people from buying them. Can you help me think of all the reasons why lack of space is bad? Medical problems caused or exacerbated by them would be really good to know too.

Angie65
19-03-2010, 01:43 PM
I had a bun who was hutchbound who was overweight - so there's all the probs that can lead to - sore hocks (too much weight on feet), mucky bum/flystrike (can't clean themselves), heart probs as being fat is a strain on their heart.

He also had overgrown nails - I know we still need to clip them, but being loose they can get filed on concrete/rough ground etc.

Also I should imagine back probs if bun can't peroscope - my Alistair crawled when I first got him - one foot after other, in a snakey way. So I should imagine there was muscular or joint pain there

Then there's muscle wastage etc.

I actually have a bun here I am worried about, but I need to speak to somebody else before I can post:D

VikkiVet
19-03-2010, 02:06 PM
obesity
urine scald
long nails - leads to foot/toe deformation
low bone density
sore hocks in prone breeds
aggression and territorialism
self mutilation due to boredom
spinal deformation
hip and elbow joint formation problems in young animals
inability to clean the rear end and/or eat caecotrophs leads to faeces stuck in the fur, leading to skin conditions, flystrike, urinary tract infections, abscesses.....

louise and Gus
19-03-2010, 02:06 PM
When I got Sweetepea she had lived in a small hutch all her life, she had hardly any muscle and couldn't hop or jump for ages, she just sort of crawled :cry::cry:

BobbleG
19-03-2010, 02:17 PM
When I got Sweetepea she had lived in a small hutch all her life, she had hardly any muscle and couldn't hop or jump for ages, she just sort of crawled :cry::cry:

I remember you telling me about that. Poor little Sweetpea. That is SO wrong. Thank goodness she's got the life of riley now! :D

I was going to suggest muscle wastage is one of the biggest issues arising from small cages.....guess that proves the point. :(

louise and Gus
19-03-2010, 02:19 PM
This is her when I first got her..notice how skinny her front legs are

http://i76.photobucket.com/albums/j31/lillou77/sweetpea.jpg

This is her now :D
http://i76.photobucket.com/albums/j31/lillou77/bunnyiv047.jpg

*Spider*
19-03-2010, 02:22 PM
Ahh Lou! You stole my one!
I was about to say muscle wastage, when Ghostie came she had little muscle at all bless her heart.
Ghostie had been kept in a 1ft hamster cage along with another rabbit.
She was filthy and immaciated.

Bluesmum
19-03-2010, 02:23 PM
Bunny addicts gorgeous bridge bun Emilys back problems and artritis were due to being kept in too small a hutch.
(Hope you don't mind me saying Denise :oops: )

Gemmapookie
19-03-2010, 02:44 PM
Definatly mention mental and behavioural probs aswell. Boredom leading to self mutilation, depression, being very territorial. Poor miserable buns :(
xxx

BB Mommy
19-03-2010, 08:21 PM
Oscar had been kept in a tiny hutch for 4 years before he came to the rescue.
When he first came home to me he had muscle wastage in his back legs and could only shuffle along with very bad co-ordination.
I've had him for 3 months living in a 12ft square space and his strength has started to improve, but he is still quite uncoordinated, particularly when he's excited and trying to move quickly.
He still can't stand properly on his back legs to wash his face, so has to sort of lean his front paws on the ground and put his face down into them. Heartbreaking to see how just how cruel it is to confine an animal to too small a space.

Hugo's There
19-03-2010, 08:35 PM
This is what it did to Evie

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii306/hugosthere/HPIM0922.jpg

BB Mommy
19-03-2010, 08:38 PM
This is what it did to Evie

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii306/hugosthere/HPIM0922.jpg

:cry::cry::cry:
Has she improved any since that photo?

Bunnyaddict
19-03-2010, 08:44 PM
Bunny addicts gorgeous bridge bun Emilys back problems and artritis were due to being kept in too small a hutch.
(Hope you don't mind me saying Denise :oops: )

No of course I don't Sam - thank you for remembering her :)

I was about to say about Emily - she was horrendous bless her when we first brought her home. She should NEVER have been kept in a hutch - even a 6ft one :(

Our vet said that Emily's problems started from her being so young & never really having the chance to develop properly as a young rabbit. Not able to build up her muscles or strength :cry: I have no doubt had Emily not been kept in a hutch for such a large part of her life - she would still be with us now :cry: Her problems were far too gone before she even came to us :cry:

I think the psychological problems it also causes is equally as bad :cry: I've found with some of our buns we've rescued - they've absolutely freaked when given space :cry: As if it's made them agraphobic :(

Hugo's There
19-03-2010, 08:48 PM
:cry::cry::cry:
Has she improved any since that photo?

No she died a few months later :(

It still breaks my heart to think of her, she was so special http://forums.rabbitrehome.org.uk/showthread.php?t=143004&highlight=evie

Gemmapookie
19-03-2010, 08:53 PM
No she died a few months later :(

It still breaks my heart to think of her, she was so special http://forums.rabbitrehome.org.uk/showthread.php?t=143004&highlight=evie

Ugh thats auwful, makes me so sad and angry, poor gorgeous girl :( xxx

KarenM
19-03-2010, 09:18 PM
Poor Evie. :(:(

Pangolin
19-03-2010, 09:24 PM
Repetitive behaviour is something that often springs up in animals that are confined in inappropriately sized housing.

When I brought home our bun she'd been kept in a very small hutch and even when she was free range with a giant hutch to come and go from she would sit and obsessively yank at the wire on door. It took quite a while before she started moving about properly and playing with her toys.

Another example, though not a rabbit but I would assume similar things could happen, was a dumped rat buck that I took in. He'd been kept in a 5"x8" (yes, I do mean INCHES) glass tank and when I put him in our convalescent cage it took him a while before he realised he could actually move about.

parsnipbun
19-03-2010, 09:52 PM
If they are kept there from young and also if kept solitary it makes them 'shut off' and not develop their intelligence or behaviour fully.

I am not saying that they cannot recover from this - but it is as if you had kept a child in small solitary confinement for years - its takes them months and even years to 'develop' bunny traits of inquisitiveness, bunny behaviour (grooming others) .

In effect they just 'shut off' otherwise they would have gone mad from boredom.

i have one that has taken a year to recover.

Hoppit!
19-03-2010, 10:40 PM
No she died a few months later :(

It still breaks my heart to think of her, she was so special http://forums.rabbitrehome.org.uk/showthread.php?t=143004&highlight=evie

God, that's horrific! :cry: Poor little rabbits.

Thanks for all your contributions guys, I've included a lot of them in my email to P@H. I doubt it'll make any difference, but it's always worth a try.

happysaz133
19-03-2010, 10:56 PM
Yep, its worth a try, good on you!

Their hutches are very small, and those that are of a decent size, the Orchard or whatever it is, its meant to be pants quality!

However the Lavender Lodge (which would be OK for one bun or a dwarf pair) is actually really good.

lottielouise
19-03-2010, 11:08 PM
Charlie was depressed when he first came to me he was kept in a 3ft hutch run combo, so had more space than some poor buns, but just sat in the corner of his hutch and did nothing all day.

http://forums.rabbitrehome.org.uk/showthread.php?t=144376&highlight=charlie

Bigger accomodation and a new set of friends soon sorted that out :)

VickiP
19-03-2010, 11:12 PM
This is sad to read in the sense there are so many poor unfortunate little bunnies being subjected to this misery. I think the worst has to be breeding hutches, not to be able to periscope, run, binky, stretch out etc is undeniably cruelty in my view. How those hutches can be deemed acceptable is absolutely beyond belief, what part of being a rabbit can they do - oh they can eat and get fat and churn out babies through forced breeding - and this is deemed as a 'nice hobby' by some. :roll::evil: I saw a Frenchie in a tiny 'breeding' hutch doing what can only be described as similar to a tiger in captivity he was head shaking rather than pacing though as he didn't have enough room, at one point I thought he may make a jump for it as the door was open but, sadly even if he had got out he probably wouldn't have known what to do.:cry:

prettylupin
19-03-2010, 11:17 PM
I'm writing reviews on tiny hutches and runs now, to point out why they aren't so good and maybe stop a few people from buying them. Can you help me think of all the reasons why lack of space is bad? Medical problems caused or exacerbated by them would be really good to know too.

One I haven't seen mentioned so far (forgive me if I've missed it) is lack of exercise = poorly developed muscles... including heart muscle! This means that bun is far more likely to have a heart attack when exposed to sudden threats/danger/ and shock (physical and systemic).

Hoppit!
20-03-2010, 08:19 AM
Yep, its worth a try, good on you!

Their hutches are very small, and those that are of a decent size, the Orchard or whatever it is, its meant to be pants quality!

However the Lavender Lodge (which would be OK for one bun or a dwarf pair) is actually really good.

See, that really bugs me! P@H do some FANTASTIC stuff, they just let themselves down in a few areas! I'm really mad with them over the 'Easter deal' becasue they'd improved soooo much over the last few years. I just hope they'll take back the poor little things if and when they're grown bored of, and give them another chance.

I'm starting writing reviews now for everywhere selling pet stuff I can find that'll let me - if it influences just one person it'll be worth it.

sillyrabbit
20-03-2010, 11:45 AM
I'm writing reviews on tiny hutches and runs now, to point out why they aren't so good and maybe stop a few people from buying them. Can you help me think of all the reasons why lack of space is bad? Medical problems caused or exacerbated by them would be really good to know too.

Beau was kept in a small hutch before the animal shelter took him and for a while he was very nervous in open spaces :( Like the first time he played in the garden he must have been terrified, he stayed very close to the fence the whole time and wouldn't cross the garden and given the chance he would stay in his hutch. Once he started copying Buu he was fine but you could definitely tell even in the house that in the first month or so he wasn't comfortable unless he was sitting in or right beside his cardboard box

His back legs were also quite weak, which my vet said was poorly developed muscles. At first he didn't hop like the others, he would crawl in the way a cat would

He was quite nervous of people for a bit but that was probably lack of interaction as his previous owners didn't really do much but feed him, but he did become confident with people very quickly

thumps_
20-03-2010, 04:56 PM
If they are kept there from young and also if kept solitary it makes them 'shut off' and not develop their intelligence or behaviour fully.

I am not saying that they cannot recover from this - but it is as if you had kept a child in small solitary confinement for years - its takes them months and even years to 'develop' bunny traits of inquisitiveness, bunny behaviour (grooming others) .

In effect they just 'shut off' otherwise they would have gone mad from boredom.

i have one that has taken a year to recover.

Absolutely, and heartbreakingly, probably the commonest effect of inadequate housing on buns. Rabbits are remarkably intelligent, & sensitive creatures, when allowed to develope their potential.