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rabbitz123
13-03-2010, 09:40 PM
Hey im finially might be getting an rabbit tomorrw or next week unfortunatly my hamster died :( RIP coco

However my mum kept saying i should get another hamster but i don't want to replace her so i ask for an rabbit

i have been looking at rehoming centres but they are too far away and the one near me i tried emailing but i think there email adress is wrong

I can't have two bunnies however im getting an big cage for my rabbit and letting her roam around the house after school so hopefully tomorrw or next week ill go to the pet shop and buy one

I was talking to my friend about what type of rabbit is the most friendlyist and she said not to get an dwarf if its your first rabbit because they are short tempered? any recommend an nice breed of rabbit that really friendly

antigone
13-03-2010, 09:44 PM
How old are you?
Rabbits can live for over ten years. Are you ready for this responsibility? If your mother thinks that a hamster will be best, maybe you should listen to her.

rabbitz123
13-03-2010, 09:48 PM
hey im 14 and love bunnies
I think im ready because my sister had an rabbit and i looked after that plus my mum used to breed rabbits

and i sometimes go round my cousion whos younger and help with her rabbit.

Hanlou
13-03-2010, 09:49 PM
Hello and welcome to the forum. :wave:

Rabbits really should have company. Not many rescues would be happy to rehome a single rabbit to you unless it is one that will not live with other rabbits.

Are you aware of just how much space rabbits need and of all their other needs? They are about as different to hamsters as you can imagine! :shock:

Rabbits need space - plenty of space. A 'big cage' will not be big enough. Most 'cages' sold in pet shops for rabbits are pathetically small. My Jack has a 4ft x 30" x 30" dog crate as a base but has free range of his room all the time. If you plan to keep your rabbit in any sort of space they really need to have a dog pen attached at all times. Rabbits are big and need space to move around.

They need to be vaccinated - myxi. vaccination twice a year and VHD once a year.

Vet treatment can be very expensive and their diet needs to be carefully managed. They need hay, hay and more hay with only a very small amount of pellets and some veg.

They chew and gnaw and can be destructive.

If you plan to keep one / two in your bedroom they may well keep you awake as they are active at night.

Rabbits can live for 10 years + - can you make this kind of commitment?

Just a few things to think about. Please think long and hard before deciding on a rabbit as they are much more demanding as pets than most people realise! x

Jack-Bun
13-03-2010, 09:50 PM
hey im 14 and love bunnies
I think im ready because my sister had an rabbit and i looked after that plus my mum used to breed rabbits

and i sometimes go round my cousion whos younger and help with her rabbit.

Rabbits can live up to 10 years sometimes even longer.
Please don't buy one from a pet shop! PLease try and rescue one... How come you cant have 2?
How big is the cage she will have? Will she have a run?

antigone
13-03-2010, 09:52 PM
I don't doubt your motives but have you thought about what's going to happen to the rabbit when in a few years you leave your home, to go to University for example? If your mother doesn't agree with having a rabbit at home, it will be very difficult for both you and the bunny. Please try to get your mother's permission before you decide what to do.

Hanlou
13-03-2010, 09:53 PM
hey im 14 and love bunnies
I think im ready because my sister had an rabbit and i looked after that plus my mum used to breed rabbits

and i sometimes go round my cousion whos younger and help with her rabbit.

Can I ask what sort of accommodation these rabbits have? Many people simply do not realise just how much space these wonderful animals need. An outdoor rabbit should have as a minimum a 6ft x 2ft x 2ft hutch with a 6ft x 4ft run - preferably with the run attached so that they can use it at will.

Anything much smaller than this would deprive a rabbit of the chance to be a rabbit - binky about and play. Jack is a maniac when he zooms about, lol.

Jack-Bun
13-03-2010, 09:55 PM
Can I ask what sort of accommodation these rabbits have? Many people simply do not realise just how much space these wonderful animals need. An outdoor rabbit should have as a minimum a 6ft x 2ft x 2ft hutch with a 6ft x 4ft run - preferably with the run attached so that they can use it at will.

Anything much smaller than this would deprive a rabbit of the chance to be a rabbit - binky about and play. Jack is a maniac when he zooms about, lol.

So are my two, they have free range of my back garden which is huge, and easily run 20 feet when binkying...can you offer them the space they need? :)

rabbitz123
13-03-2010, 09:58 PM
im going to have an long and hard think about this

i can't have two because my mum said i can only have one and one only however if i find two ill try and say that my other sister can look after one and i could look after the other

im thinking of having an dog crate because my friend has one for her rabbits and an shed

i don't want to go for another hamster because it will be like replacing the one i love dearly

Jack-Bun
13-03-2010, 10:00 PM
im going to have an long and hard think about this

i can't have two because my mum said i can only have one and one only however if i find two ill try and say that my other sister can look after one and i could look after the other

im thinking of having an dog crate because my friend has one for her rabbits and an shed

i don't want to go for another hamster because it will be like replacing the one i love dearly

Please think LONG and HARD about this. Have you thought about when you go on holiday?
A dog crate is an excellent option for indoor bunnies, but they still need to run around etc for hours :)

rabbitz123
13-03-2010, 10:00 PM
thanks for everyone giving me measurments ill try to find something with the same measurement or bigger

antigone
13-03-2010, 10:04 PM
Rabbits are very destructive. How is your mother going to feel, when the rabbit starts chewing the furniture, wall paper, skirting boards, carpet, electric wires, etc?

Hanlou
13-03-2010, 10:06 PM
Here are some pics of (( My rabbits set-up at the moment )) (http://forums.rabbitrehome.org.uk/showthread.php?t=217393&highlight=Jack) - he will be bonded with a female rabbit soon. x

He comes out and has free range of the upstairs regularly too but we plan to move him (and his future wifebun'!) outside when the weather warms up and we have set everything up. We're hoping to have a 6x4 shed with an attached 6x6 run. They will be able to have free range of the garden too.

If you do get another hamster - why not have a look around at nearby rescues? A lot of rescues have hamster's in - we have a Syrian hamster and several dwarf hamsters - all of them were rescues apart from one.

Becky86
13-03-2010, 10:06 PM
I cant understand how you can go from a hamster to a rabbit. I know you dont want to replace your hamster that died, but couldnt you have a gerbil or a rat or something.

A rabbit is a big commitment. Rabbits are also very expensive. Does your mum know the rabbit will need vaccinating 3 times a year? If its a female she will need to be neutered to prevent uterine cancer, this op can cost around 80.

Please think :( Also please dont just buy a rabbit from a pet shop! Why not rescue a rabbit?! At least you'd know its temperment then? xXx

AriaSwan
13-03-2010, 10:09 PM
I just got my first rabbit too.
They are alot of work, but if you have a spare room and lots of time it isn't TOO hard. I got a 5 foot buy 2 foot cage, and a hutch for the summer, and I bunny proofed the spare bedroom. Babies are good to get if you're inexperienced because they are so small they will let you touch them. You have to have alot of time. I spent two hours sitting in my new bunny's room waiting for him to approach me, and I have had him out 4 hours a day for the last 2 days I have had him, and he still barely lets me stroke him once. You can't get discouraged and expect the bunny to want to cuddle at first. I had a hamster, and the are wayy easier. Hamsters are nice, but they are more trusting and less intelligent, so they will trust almost anyone who picks them up. Rabbits are more of a prey animal and are very skittish at first. Make sure you are committed to a long time before he or she trusts you, and then a lifespan of over 10 years after taht.

Hanlou
13-03-2010, 10:10 PM
I cant understand how you can go from a hamster to a rabbit. I know you dont want to replace your hamster that died, but couldnt you have a gerbil or a rat or something.

Lol not 'a rat' or 'a gerbil' as they need to live in pairs at least too and ratties need pretty big set-ups. Gerbils need a 30" tank for a pair.

However; neither ratties nor gerbils live that long so would not be anywhere near the same commitment as a rabbit. Gerbils make lovely pets - they are very friendly and aren't nocturnal so are awake in the day more than hamsters. Rats can be expensive vet-bill-wise as they often suffer from various illnesses so I wouldn't really recommend them unless you have a steady income or parents that are prepared to shell out for these things.

I know *just* what you're saying Becky - just thought I'd mention this though lol. :p

rabbitz123
13-03-2010, 10:12 PM
my mum knows alot about rabbit and is very committed into helping me sort my rabbit out

ive had mice in the passed and they excaped ive been in contact with an few rehomeing places and some with hamster i can't diside

Hanlou
13-03-2010, 10:12 PM
my mum knows alot about rabbit and is very committed into helping me sort my rabbit out

ive had mice in the passed and they excaped ive been in contact with an few rehomeing places and some with hamster i can't diside

In a suitable cage mice would not be able to escape...... I have 12 mice and they've never escaped unless I've left the door open! :?

antigone
13-03-2010, 10:16 PM
I have rabbits and a hamster. The rabbits are really expensive, with regards to vet bills, and very hard work. The hamster, on the other hand isn't.:) It is my third hamster, as the previous two died. By getting this one, I was not replacing the others. I was just giving a home to an animal in need. Please reconsider.

bensonlola
13-03-2010, 10:19 PM
Oh pleeeeeeeeease take it from me. I got two rabbits last August not realising how much work it takes to keep them happy!! You sound like you love animals and I'm sure you wouldn't want to keep a little animal that was unhappy but for starters, a single bunny is a lonely bunny. They need loads of space with constant access to it all the time. The rabbits you see living in hutches, no matter how big, are miserable and they can develop bone problems from not getting enough exercise.

What about guinea pigs? They wouldn't need as much room (although they still need a fair amount), they make sweet little noises and you could maybe get two or three of them, because they like to live in little gangs!!

What about ringing a rescue and asking for advice, or look up RWAF on the net and email them any questions - they even have a helpline number and the lady there is lovely and will only be too happy to give you advice. :)

Becky86
13-03-2010, 10:20 PM
Lol not 'a rat' or 'a gerbil' as they need to live in pairs at least too and ratties need pretty big set-ups. Gerbils need a 30" tank for a pair.

However; neither ratties nor gerbils live that long so would not be anywhere near the same commitment as a rabbit. Gerbils make lovely pets - they are very friendly and aren't nocturnal so are awake in the day more than hamsters. Rats can be expensive vet-bill-wise as they often suffer from various illnesses so I wouldn't really recommend them unless you have a steady income or parents that are prepared to shell out for these things.

I know *just* what you're saying Becky - just thought I'd mention this though lol. :p

:oops::oops: I just thought a gerbil was similar to a hamsters needs? A rat would need much more space, i know, as our chins have a cage suitable for ratties :) Good point about the rat vets bills though, i know alot of forum members have high rat vets bills :(

She shouldnt be getting 'a rabbit' though ;) They're meant to live in pairs!! xXx

Hanlou
13-03-2010, 10:24 PM
She shouldnt be getting 'a rabbit' though ;) They're meant to live in pairs!! xXx

Lol yes I've mentioned this already. ;)

I wouldn't say they're the same as hamsters though similar in some ways ...... they are sociable and love to dig, dig, dig, dig.... :lol::lol:..... so they need a tank rather than a cage. Mine construct some fairly amazing tunnels. :p

My two gerbils were rescued from a horrible home - if you don't get any rabbits think of it this way - it's so wonderful to give a nice, spacious, clean home to an animal (or two!) that has had a rough start in life. :D xx

*lily*
13-03-2010, 10:30 PM
I bet you are so excited about getting your rabbit :D

Your Mom needs to be 100% committed to having a rabbit too as ultimately she will be responsible for it's wellbeing.

Look forward to seeing piccies :D

happybun
13-03-2010, 10:39 PM
i strongly advise against getting one or more rabbits as pets, unless you are a person of mature years (ie over 40 - yep, that rules out most bunnymummies!) with money and time to spare (and that rules me out).

if you haven't done it yet, don't. get a hairy hamster, a big syrian with longish hair, not a fancy long haired one. my fluffy was a delightful friend and companion, really showing a personality and keen to interact with me, and she cost a pound a week to keep rather than the 20-3O my pair of rabbits cost. cleaning her cage took half an hour tops, and that was a full scrub, rather than the several hours a thorough clean of the rabbit area takes. my rabbits are in an 8'x10' indoor pen at the moment and they'd like more space.


don't, don't, don't have rabbits. really, don't.

Snouter
13-03-2010, 10:40 PM
im going to have an long and hard think about this

i can't have two because my mum said i can only have one and one only however if i find two ill try and say that my other sister can look after one and i could look after the other

im thinking of having an dog crate because my friend has one for her rabbits and an shed

i don't want to go for another hamster because it will be like replacing the one i love dearly

:wave: Welcome to the forum.

You are doing a very good and sensible thing by having a long and hard think about this. As other posts have pointed out, having a rabbit (or two) is a great pleasure. It is a great privilege to own one of these wonderful, intelligent and affectionate creatures and to welcome them into your life. It is also a huge commitment. A rabbit takes as much looking after as a cat or dog and costs about the same in regular bills.

From the day anyone gets a rabbit (or pair of rabbits), the rabbit's life is, literally, in its owners hands for their entire life. They live around 8 years (in some cases longer) and need to be assured that they will have a carer for their entire life.

I would not, of course, even presume to comment on your life because that's your business.:oops:

From 14, life tends to involve school, exams (GCSEs, AS levels and A levels). Then, maybe, going away to university. It's highly unlikely that a rabbit can be kept at university. You will be around 22 (or older) by the end of the rabbit's natural life and who can predict the changes in your life by then? Are you, and maybe your mother (if she has to take over the carer role), willing and able to make that commitment now for that length of time?

All of this may sound negative - it's not meant to be. If, for any reason, the rabbit could no longer be cared for it may have to be given up to a rescue (if they have any space). If you take a look around the posts on this forum you will see that there are already 33,000 rabbits in rescue looking for forever homes. These rabbits came into rescue through no fault of their own - they could not decide for themselves that they were no longer wanted or that their owners could no longer care for them.

The rescues are overflowing with so much demand that some have little or no room for new rabbits. They are always desperate for suitable people to adopt rabbits to create spaces for more.

I hope that all of the information on this forum will help you to make your decision.

antigone
13-03-2010, 10:42 PM
i strongly advise against getting one or more rabbits as pets, unless you are a person of mature years (ie over 40 - yep, that rules out most bunnymummies!) with money and time to spare (and that rules me out).

if you haven't done it yet, don't. get a hairy hamster, a big syrian with longish hair, not a fancy long haired one. my fluffy was a delightful friend and companion, really showing a personality and keen to interact with me, and she cost a pound a week to keep rather than the 20-3O my pair of rabbits cost. cleaning her cage took half an hour tops, and that was a full scrub, rather than the several hours a thorough clean of the rabbit area takes. my rabbits are in an 8'x10' indoor pen at the moment and they'd like more space.


don't, don't, don't have rabbits. really, don't.

Great post! :thumb:

rabbitapril
13-03-2010, 11:33 PM
pahaps you should show your mum the replies to this thread then you can both decide together if a rabbit is the right pet for you, i am sure there is another hamster out there somewhere waitng for you to find him and give him a lovely home, you sound like a very careing person.

tintin
13-03-2010, 11:35 PM
We got two baby young rabbits from Pets at Home about 8 months ago. Oh man, they are loads of work...loads. If you are lucky enough to have a huge outdor shed with an attached run that's great, but I have to get them in the run, supervise them because the garden isn't fully safe, clean the hutch.

Since we got rabbits the yard is full of junk and we look like the Clampitts (characters on an old tv show). Plus, the rabbits fell out and have to be separate, so it's two lots of supervised run time, two lots of mucking out.

Plus... mine don't even like me much, don't go much for cuddling and mostly just run off.

Cost of neutering two was 80, and we haven't had the jabs yet - 4 x 15.

If you are set on getting a rabbit I would definitely get one from a rescue - it will be neutered and may have had it's jabs and you can get one where they know it likes to be petted. I wish we had done that. They will be aware of any health issues, whereas with a pet shop animal you don't know if it's got underlying health problems.

Also, not to be brutal, but if you get one that is say, 2 years old, it is not going to live the 10 years that a baby rabbit may. When you are in your twenties, maybe moving into rented accomodation, or in with a boyfriend, going on hols, or starting college, etc. you will not have a pet to worry about.

Some of the vets bills mentioned on here are truly horrendous, so most important thing is to discuss it thoroughly with your mum.

rabbitz123
16-03-2010, 07:29 PM
Hi everyone little update

i still am thinking of getting an bunny however we have to ask our landlord first whether im allowed to keep an rabbit since our landlord loves pets i don't see why not.

ive seen an dutch rabbit near me that someone giving away due to it was not getting on with there other rabbits and was not to keen to breed shes one years old
there also an rescue near by and once we get an answer from our landlord me and my mum are arranging an appointment to see the bunnies avaible
Plus also there an rspca near by.

Thanks everyone for there comment im outstand by all your comment coming in fast i can all see you love rabbits :)

RubyTed
16-03-2010, 07:49 PM
Hi :wave::wave:

If you really have your heart set on a bunny then can I go against some of the advise given here, and say that you should think about getting an older bun (5+).

You're young, and as said above, your life is going to change a lot....you might decide you don't have enough time for your bunny.

Getting a slightly older bun means that you will know his/her temperament. Most bunnies are not snuggle bunnies, and unless you're there all day there's a huge possibility that your bunny will not want to know you. (Especially when got from a pet shop, as they don't handle their buns when young.)

I've been at both sides, having had buns from when they were babies, and from adult...and without a doubt the easiest I've had it is from the buns I've had from adults. All rabbits go through puberty, and I remember that I was constantly covered in gashes up my arms and tummy, where a pubescent Teddy would use me as a spring board (And this is from the friendliest bunny ever!;)). I found Ruby (The other one I had from a baby) extremely hard, because of her litter habits. She was fully litter trained from four months (but that was two months of constant poo everywhere, and the odd wee.:shock::() She's going through puberty now, and can be a little horror! :lol:

You say that you want a friendly rabbit. Unless you get an adult (2+) you have no idea how your bunny will be. If s/he didn't like cuddles then would you not want to play with him/her?

#if you're out most of the day then you should really get two rabbits, as they are very sociable!

Bunnies need three jabs a year (amounting to about 60/80.) They need a constant supply of good quality hay, herbs, veg, pellets. They need more space than you can imagine. Forever more will you find hay in your bed, shoes....bra:shock:!

You've made a great step by coming on the forum!:D

rabbitz123
16-03-2010, 07:56 PM
hey thanks ill just have to see whats at these rescues

the bunny i was talking about the dutch rabbit whos 1 is actually an really good bunny to handle according to the owner

Ive learnt that from my hamster dieing the animals are not just oh i love them for an few month then naa why should i bother because its devistating when animals die

hehe i can imagine what it like with an bunnie on puberty :lol:

*Spider*
16-03-2010, 07:59 PM
Right, if you really can only have one rabbits, I'd trawl through some rescues and find a bunny that can only be housed by itself.
In my opinion, in most cases it's cruel to keep them on their own, as they are sociable animals and thrive in company.
Unfortunately there are some circumstances where they have to be alone, but when you know you can only have one, it's very selfish to buy or a adopt a rabbit that could and would like a bunny friend.
So, my advice would be to look at all the local rescues and call up about which buns HAVE to go alone.
If not, I'm affraid I would get a syrian hamster, as they're a solitary animal.
Best of luck!

RubyTed
16-03-2010, 08:00 PM
hey thanks ill just have to see whats at these rescues

the bunny i was talking about the dutch rabbit whos 1 is actually an really good bunny to handle according to the owner

Ive learnt that from my hamster dieing the animals are not just oh i love them for an few month then naa why should i bother because its devistating when animals die

hehe i can imagine what it like with an bunnie on puberty :lol:

Ted's puberty went on for about 9 months! :shock::shock: He's the friendliest bunny ever, but still manages to scar me! :roll:

I'd say that rabbits go through puberty until they're about 2. Only then will you get to know their true personalities!

Rachel89
16-03-2010, 08:01 PM
What county are you in? I'm sure people will be able to tell you about rescues close to you :)

rabbitz123
16-03-2010, 08:04 PM
hey i know alot of your are saying i said get 2 i most probly will because my sister will start feeling left out . Im going at the weekend to resues etc soo i have an good browes

If my landlord does not let me have an rabbit then i will be getting 2 dwarf hamster or 1 syrian anyway

Oh i live in the uk in bedfordshire :)

TeflonsShadow
16-03-2010, 08:05 PM
http://i1000.photobucket.com/albums/af121/TeflonsShadow/1.jpg

How about a nice chocolate rabbit instead? Yum yum!!

rabbitz123
16-03-2010, 08:08 PM
Hmm they look lovely love the poster

Like an child i want an real one :) :lol::p

RubyTed
16-03-2010, 08:14 PM
Hmm they look lovely love the poster

Like an child i want an real one :) :lol::p

Do you know that you'll be able to afford it? Remember that getting two would be a lot more.

Getting a bunny isn't quick or easy. Before you go to rescues you need to have the accommodation ready and set up, as they will want to know what your bunnies are going to be housed in. They'll do a homecheck, then you get the bunny. It'll have to be your mum adopting them, as your not old enough. Is she ready to take on all this responsibility?

rabbitz123
16-03-2010, 08:17 PM
im sure my mum will help me out with the costing i also have an paper round so that give in abit of money

we got our last rabbit from an rescue so im sure it going to be okay

LionheadLuver
16-03-2010, 08:59 PM
You sound very mature, and well done for asking for advice. i just want to say good luck and listen to all the advice on here, which you are already doing so well done.

TeflonsShadow
16-03-2010, 09:24 PM
Please look closely at some of the figures on that poster, I am sure that is more than you earn on a paper route, just remember, a rabbit is not a toy, they are a true friend and they have very big needs. Vet care when they become ill is very expencive....... very very expencive. Alot of people take out insurance on their buns to put a bumper on the costs......They are cuddily, but ever so fragile.

My rabbit Tipsy, cost me over 600 (I am too scared to add it up properly... I think its more 1000.....) because another rabbit bit her to assert dominance and caused her to get abcsesses...... she lived, but it still cost a lot!

Then theres my sisters rabbit, Toby, he has dreadful dentl problems, for some reason his insisors started growing abnormally (randomly, he was 5 years old when it started....) and now he had to have operations to have his front 4 teeth removed about 3 times a year at a wonderful cost of at least 100 a time. :( Hes 8 so still got a few years to go but hes happy other than that. We dont have the heart to put him down because of his bad teeth, its not his fault.

Its like a marriage, you have to be in it for sickness or for worse. Can you forsee your mum bailing out 3 digit (and maybe 4 digit) cheques to keep your new friend alive?

Sometimes its better to wait till you have a better income, so your parents dont have to pay..... that way YOU get to make the decisions. I know for a fact that if Tipsy were my mums rabbit, she would have been put down because the costs were mounting.

Good luck in whatever you choose. Is there a rescue near you where you can bunny cuddle and help clean out in the holidays?? Always better to pinch someone elses for a cuddle..... at least you dont have to pay for those!!!

Sorry for the ramble..........at 14, your parent/s will be in charge of most things, which can suck, I am 22 and not long past it. I would have very strong feelings against my mum if she prefered to put my rabbit down instead of bailing out lots of money to save him/her.

Pangolin
16-03-2010, 09:27 PM
There's already been some great advice from people on this thread but I thought I'd say a little about considering a rabbit's lifespan.

You're reaching a point in your life when things are going to start getting really busy and a lot of things may well change, including things you might not even be thinking about now.

When I was 14 I'd have loved a pet but I was never allowed one. At the time I thought it horribly unfair but in hindsight my parents were doing the best thing for both me and the prospective pets!!! I found it very hard to think of my life changing so much I might not have time to care for an animal. However at 17 I met my future husband, at 18 I left home to move in with him, at 20 we got married and then shortly after we bought and moved into our first house. All of that within the possible lifespan of a rabbit!!!!

I didn't even have university to consider but most people do. It may seem like forever now but it's really not that long until you'll be considering things like that yourself.

Glingle
16-03-2010, 09:29 PM
http://i1000.photobucket.com/albums/af121/TeflonsShadow/1.jpg

Haven't seen that poster before - just exactly which vets are they going to the spend 100 a year on vaccinations? My vet bill comes nowhere near that figure.

TeflonsShadow
16-03-2010, 09:31 PM
There's already been some great advice from people on this thread but I thought I'd say a little about considering a rabbit's lifespan.

You're reaching a point in your life when things are going to start getting really busy and a lot of things may well change, including things you might not even be thinking about now.

When I was 14 I'd have loved a pet but I was never allowed one. At the time I thought it horribly unfair but in hindsight my parents were doing the best thing for both me and the prospective pets!!! I found it very hard to think of my life changing so much I might not have time to care for an animal. However at 17 I met my future husband, at 18 I left home to move in with him, at 20 we got married and then shortly after we bought and moved into our first house. All of that within the possible lifespan of a rabbit!!!!

I didn't even have university to consider but most people do. It may seem like forever now but it's really not that long until you'll be considering things like that yourself.

Ah yes, good point, when I went to uni, I had to leave my outdoor bunnies at home :( Nowhere will accept them, especially not halls.

I loved getting my two when I moved in with my OH though, it was something we did together and it allowed him to bond with them too......that was worth waiting for ;)

TeflonsShadow
16-03-2010, 09:32 PM
Haven't seen that poster before - just exactly which vets are they going to the spend 100 a year on vaccinations? My vet bill comes nowhere near that figure.

Its on the MMC website.... it is possible to spend that much on vaccs depending on how much your vet charge, I mean 2 x Myxi and 1 x VHD, thats 3 vaccs a year.

Glingle
16-03-2010, 09:38 PM
Its on the MMC website.... it is possible to spend that much on vaccs depending on how much your vet charge, I mean 2 x Myxi and 1 x VHD, thats 3 vaccs a year.I must have a cheap vet then myxi vaccine is 12 and VHD's 16 give or take a few pennies.

Pangolin
16-03-2010, 09:39 PM
I loved getting my two when I moved in with my OH though, it was something we did together and it allowed him to bond with them too......that was worth waiting for ;)

Absolutely agree with that, it was lovely when OH and I got our first dog together :love:

Thankfully he's as nuts as I am and is quite keen on bunnies too:D

jenzel5
16-03-2010, 09:41 PM
I am going to say if you want to get a rabbit please ensure you do all research and provide big enough accommodation etc. I feel as if people are telling you to not get a rabbit but if both you and your mum are willing to dedicate yourselves to the time and effort and money in to a rabbit and that you understand the needs then I don't see the problem.
I had a rabbit when I was young and she was my baby and I miss her. She was the love of my life when I was younger and I can't imagine my childhood without her.
My mum did research though and my rabbit was vaccinated and neutered etc and I looked after her well and she was well loved. So just ensure you know what looking after a rabbit involves and also ensure you and your mum can afford to look after it and afford vet bills. My rabbit was at the vets at the first sign of anything wrong. My sister had another rabbit so they weren't alone, he was older than her. Good luck whatever you decide! :wave:

jenzel5
16-03-2010, 09:44 PM
Oh and well done for coming on here to get advice. :wave:

LionheadLuver
16-03-2010, 10:54 PM
A lot of people are saying to wait until you are older, but i got my rabbits at 16, and my rats at 18. i love my animals so much that i won't leave them to go to uni, or work. when i move, they'll come with me.

i think you just have to understand that life may be a bit more tricky, like you won't be able to choose unis far from home, and you'll only be able to choose between pet-friendly flats etc. as long as you are fully aware of that, then i'm sure you will be a great rabbit owner. i pay for my animals, but when i can't pay, my parents pay and then i pay them back. basically, all of your wages go on your animals when you earn little money.

happysaz133
16-03-2010, 11:56 PM
I think 14 is a fine age for a pet, you will be mature enough to do the work involved and understand the responsibilty. A lot of people are saying in the future. However perhaps you won't want to go to Uni/College. I knew at 14 I didn't want to go to either as I knew what I wanted to do didn't need those. So I got my pets, and here I am, 22, and surrounded by my 12 pets.

Yes bunnies can be hard work, but it is very rewarding. Single rabbits can live alone quite happily, as long as you are willing to spend plenty time with him/her! Some rabbits don't like other rabbits as well, you could find one of those. I had one like that, she got plenty attention from me and was a happy bun.

Jenova
17-03-2010, 12:32 AM
I got my first rabbit at 11. :)
I put in the hard work and was out with him free ranging in the garden in all weathers. My mum made me feed him before I got my dinner and clean him out before I got to watch TV.

If you know it will be hard work then go for it, having a rabbit is so much fun. They need lots of time and care but they give lots of love back. :love:

bunlover
17-03-2010, 09:07 AM
i dont think age has anything to do with it at age 11years i had a rabbit, however mum did most of the caring i jsut helped as i grew up when i di move from home chelsea(rip) was quite elderly had a fantastic set up with mum and we decided it was in chelseas interests to stay with mum, she continued to the ripe age of 11.5 years!:) and was one contented bunny! (she had variosu partners during her life) she was a bunny rabbit by that i mean not a peoples rabbit she hated being stroked or fussed but was very good to take meds come when you called her eat her dinners use her tray she jsut prefered company of her own kind!!!

i guess my point is think about all the points raised and make sure your mum is willing to keep bunny when you go off to uni/move out should she NEED to. i always thought my pets could come with me and was surprised when that wasnt the case ( i now have 4 bunnys of my own and currentlyl 3 hammies)

rabbits are expensive i have 2 myxo jabs today which when i got my rabbits first they cost 15 each now i pay 28 per bunny per injection! gulp....
(do the maths 28x3 x4 = 336 a year only in vaccinations)

still iits worth it! great idea bout the space i would definatly get your rabbit neutered if you get the 1yr old and she hasnt been done (or alternativly get one from a rescue who ahs already been neutered thus saving huge amounts of money!!!) as apart from being hormonal bunnies regularly get cancer(over 85% die sue to it) therefore it is really in your buns health also you need to find a rabbit savvy vet in your area as rabbits are now classified as exotics and not every vet has the expertise to deal with them correctly, it can be the difference between life and death for a critically ill bunny .
this may help you too....
Rehoming Animals Telephone Service (RATS) (View Rabbits)
Tel: 01234 301526 /

The Alternative Animal Sanctuary,
Doone Brue Farm, Windmill Road, Pepperstock, Luton, Beds, LU1 4LQ
Tel: 07818 406619 / Email / Website

Sandy Rabbit Rescue (View Rabbits)
14 Berwick Way, Beds, SG19 1TR
Tel: 01767 691347 / Email /

RSPCA Beds South Branch (View Rabbits)
c/o 3 Buttercup Close, Dunstable
Tel: 07967 013373 / Email / Website
and this is a list of bunnys in your area
http://www.rabbitrehome.org.uk/search.asp?RabAge=&RabSex=%25&RabBond=%25&County=Bedfordshire&Submit=++Search++

also you could go along the route of getting a bunny froma rescue further afield this often happens and means that a bunny run would get arranged for them to be transported to you you would still have a homecheeck too :) good luck in the search for your bunny. x