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Homestead Mom
30-12-2009, 04:37 AM
Hello!
My 9 year old daughter is learning to use a spinning wheel. We would like to spin rabbit fur. I have a few questions...
What type of rabbits should we buy?
What is the average price for the rabbits?
When do you remove the fur and how do you do it?
We are in 4H and she may even want to do a rabbit project with them.
Thanks!!!:)

Crazyt123
30-12-2009, 05:22 AM
:wave: imno expert what soo everon this subject but I believe anogoras are most commonly used here a site with some info.but Im sure others heremay be able to help.

http://www.angorarabbit.com/angora/angora-rabbit-manual/index.htm


maybe you could check out rescues to see if they have any anogras

Tamsin
30-12-2009, 06:05 AM
The best idea would be to get in touch with other people that spin rabbit fur. They'll be able to guide you towards the best breeds/breeders. Most of us here just keep them as pets :)

Is your daughter also interested in rabbits? Liking spinning doesn't necessarily translate to wanting to clean out rabbits for the next 5-10years ;) The other option would be to make friends with some angora breeders in your area and collect wool from them :)

DemiS
03-01-2010, 08:24 PM
It's an Angora you need, English Angora's look to have the longest wool, but I think you need an American breeder/exhibitor forum to confirm that. You can ever shear the rabbit (like you would a sheep, although be careful, because rabbit skin is like paper), or you could pluck the rabbits fur when moulting :)

petparadise123
03-01-2010, 08:43 PM
Perhaps rather than buying a rabbit you could buy the wool? I bet there are owners about that dont use it. I have tons spare from my angora:)

parsnipbun
03-01-2010, 08:48 PM
I would definitely not recommend that you purchase rabbits for this project.

Rabbits live for up to 12 years, will need constant care including daily clean outs, are prone to a range of digestive problems if not looked after properly, need a lot of space to run around and stay healthy, and are basically high maintenance pets who need you to really care a lot for them.

Angora rabbits are also even more demanding of care as their fur is long and tangles easily - they need constant trimming.

Rabbits are incredibly rewarding pets IF you can give them large amounts of space, lots of your time, constant love, and are prepared to invest large sums of money in suitable housing, vets fees (vaccines and neutering and any illnesses), good quality hay and feeds.

Otherwise just buy rabbit hair elsewhere (although please check it is not from one of the awful rabbit farms that exist).Rescues are already full with 30,000 rabbits a year passed to rescues after they were purchased on 'a whim'.

Candiflare
03-01-2010, 08:57 PM
I am really disturbed by this thread :( I don't understand what's going on..

Becky86
03-01-2010, 08:59 PM
I am really disturbed by this thread :( I don't understand what's going on..

THe OP wants to buy rabbits so she can use their fur for her daughter to use on the spinning wheel :cry:

I am disturbed by this too. As people have said above, rabbits are hard work. Angoras will need regular grooming to keep their fur clean and unmatted, which will take up alot of time daily. Rabbits are expensive too, vaccinations, neutering, housing, health problems, all adds up.

Please think about buying angora wool from somewhere reputable rather than buying the actual rabbits :cry: xXx

DemiS
03-01-2010, 09:27 PM
Angora wool is really expensive to buy :shock:

Lillian
03-01-2010, 09:31 PM
Please think about buying angora wool from somewhere reputable rather than buying the actual rabbits :cry: xXx

Agree.

I am saddened by this too :(

Benjybunnyboo
03-01-2010, 09:35 PM
Is this a wind up :shock:

Jaysmonkey
03-01-2010, 09:42 PM
:roll: This thread is awful :cry:.

w1lll
03-01-2010, 09:45 PM
Right, let's get this straight. You want to buy a rabbit to satisfy a hobby of your daughter's that will surely not last, despite knowing NOTHING about them. What's wrong with sheep wool?

Buuny_Friend
03-01-2010, 10:01 PM
:cry: God, what a horrible thread :(

Becky86
03-01-2010, 10:02 PM
Angora wool is really expensive to buy :shock:

So you would rather the OP goes out and buys angoras then? :roll:

Buuny_Friend
03-01-2010, 10:04 PM
Angora wool is really expensive to buy :shock:

More expensive than looking after a PAIR of rabbits PROPERLY for the whole of their lives? :roll:

Jenova
03-01-2010, 10:06 PM
Before you buy a rabbit you should research everything about owning them. They're living beings and it's a massive responisility like any pet. Angoras are even more so as they need regular grooming.

Mudgy
03-01-2010, 10:18 PM
Hello!
My 9 year old daughter is learning to use a spinning wheel. We would like to spin rabbit fur. I have a few questions...
What type of rabbits should we buy?
What is the average price for the rabbits?
When do you remove the fur and how do you do it?
We are in 4H and she may even want to do a rabbit project with them.
Thanks!!!:)

I thought 4-H were trying to move away from their animal based projects now?
Why not get in touch with ARBA, and find breeders who keep wool producers in your area, and see if they will supply you with wool rather than rabbits?

Candiflare
03-01-2010, 10:30 PM
who are 4-H???

Becky86
03-01-2010, 10:31 PM
who are 4-H???

Just got this off the net:

4-H in the United States and Canada is a youth organization administered by the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service of the United States Department of Agriculture, with the mission of "engaging youth to reach their fullest potential while advancing the field of youth development."[1] The name represents four personal development areas of focus for the organization: head, heart, hands, and health.

Mudgy
03-01-2010, 10:33 PM
who are 4-H???

A youth organisation in the U.S. I think it's more popular in country areas. Kind of like the Guides, but with banjos.

Lspacehopper
03-01-2010, 10:56 PM
A youth organisation in the U.S. I think it's more popular in country areas. Kind of like the Guides, but with banjos.

Sorry...this made me giggle lol

Mudgy
03-01-2010, 10:58 PM
Sorry...this made me giggle lol

Good, it's the best antidote to worry ;)

LoopyLouie
03-01-2010, 11:00 PM
This kinda made me worry as my class is called 4H :lol:

VickiP
03-01-2010, 11:12 PM
:roll: I agree I think that you should get a sheep or two for your daughter or go and buy the wool.

On a personal note I got a cardigan with Angora in it from M & S for Christmas, please tell me they are buying it from a reputable supplier someone, just going to google it :cry:

Mudgy
03-01-2010, 11:20 PM
:roll: I agree I think that you should get a sheep or two for your daughter or go and buy the wool.

On a personal note I got a cardigan with Angora in it from M & S for Christmas, please tell me they are buying it from a reputable supplier someone, just going to google it :cry:

No idea about M&S, but would be interested to know what you find out. Think most Angora wool used in the UK comes from China :(

LoopyLouie
03-01-2010, 11:25 PM
:roll: I agree I think that you should get a sheep or two for your daughter or go and buy the wool.

On a personal note I got a cardigan with Angora in it from M & S for Christmas, please tell me they are buying it from a reputable supplier someone, just going to google it :cry:


I would home M&S source eithically but you never know... :(

Mudgy
03-01-2010, 11:34 PM
I would home M&S source eithically but you never know... :(

The RSPCA run the Good Business Awards, for companies that use ethically sourced products. I imagine M&S would be part of that scheme.

VickiP
03-01-2010, 11:38 PM
:cry: I can't believe I didn't twig it was rabbit fur, I thought it was goat! Apparently fur from the angora goat is called mohair. I think M & S appear to pay lip service the RSPCA '5 freedoms' as per the animal welfare act however, yes on the cardigan label it says made in Thailand! Is it really realistic to think they will source a good breeder who is doing this in a nice way and then ship the spun wool over to Thailand - grrrrrr it makes me so mad that these massive companies can't do the right thing like they say they do, it's all money money money - they couldn't care two hoots about the animal welfare I expect. Ironically they are seeking advice from the RSPCA about the '5 freedoms' in the animal welfare act, well as I have personal experience the RSPCA only seem to enforce about 2 or 3 of the 5 freedoms anyway before deeming a breeder to be 'alright' grrrrrrrrrrrrr :censored:

purplebumble
03-01-2010, 11:58 PM
omg i never knew angora wool was only from buns and mohair was goats....:shock:

what a sad thought:cry:

purplebumble
04-01-2010, 12:00 AM
with my old frenchie doe and my bertie being plucked and combed...i could spin enough fur into wool for the whole of hampshire:lol::lol:

gods i miss old willow...her fur was like a teddy bear.
i love berties fur hes a walking dandelion clock:shock::lol:

VickiP
04-01-2010, 12:04 AM
omg i never knew angora wool was only from buns and mohair was goats....:shock:

what a sad thought:cry:

I suppose I thought a goat might have a higher chance of having a decent life even if bred for wool but, rabbits could just be stuck in tiny hutches eurghhhh it's just awful to think about it, hopefully there are some decent people looking after them properly and allowing them to have a decent life while taking the wool - the wool thing I don't have an issue with - if done properly it doesn't cause pain or anything-it's just how they are living while the wool is 'growing'??

Tamsin
04-01-2010, 12:09 AM
This user has come to get advice not be made responsible for the practices of supermarkets and consumers. There are plenty of individual spinners that keep one or two pets and also use the wool - it doesn't hurt the animal.

I suggest if you have something to add it should be a balanced and useful answer instead off at a tangent assuming the worst.

VickiP
04-01-2010, 12:16 AM
This user has come to get advice not be made responsible for the practices of supermarkets and consumers. There are plenty of individual spinners that keep one or two pets and also use the wool - it doesn't hurt the animal.

I suggest if you have something to add it should be a balanced and useful answer instead off at a tangent assuming the worst.

I agree it did go on a tangent (not intentional) and I haven't suggested that the OP is reponsible for the practices of supermarkets and consumers. I am glad to hear that there are individual spinners keeping pets and producing the wool and I know it doesn't hurt the animal. Why am I always the one who seems to be getting a 'telling off'. There are plenty of other posts on this thread not particularly helpful to the OP !:(

Tamsin
04-01-2010, 12:22 AM
There are plenty of other posts on this thread not particularly helpful to the OP !:(

Hence my post was a reminder to everyone that they should post in a helpful way.. Where did I mention you? If it was to a specific user I would have sent it to that user.

purplebumble
04-01-2010, 12:39 AM
i agree vicki.......its not intentional at the OP.
Its a good hting tomake folks aware of the practice...ims ure my mum will be in tears if i tell her how her gloves came about.

the op would indeed fare better with goats....a bigger size and quantity..

wool is an allergenic substance BUT it says one typ eof wool is actually hypoallergenic!!!

id love one of these as a pet.sounds like a corss between a ginat bunny and a goat and a donkey!! ive laways thought they were lovley looking animals too.
And in north america theyre regarded as a domesticated/pet animal.

http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Alpaca

here is somehting that may help the OP...its only brief..and see the pic that says spinning direct from rabbit.......
its a very expensive thing to happily hosue and care for rabbits esp angoras and make enough money form psinning the fur.
HOWEVER there may be many rabbit owners/breeders who are more than willing to donate enough fur to fill the requirements of your daughetrs project.:wave:

http://mammals.suite101.com/article.cfm/angora_rabbit_wool

DemiS
04-01-2010, 08:16 AM
She asked what the price were and what breed, that dosent mean her and her daughter know nothing about rabbits :?

w1lll
04-01-2010, 10:09 AM
She asked what the price were and what breed, that dosent mean her and her daughter know nothing about rabbits :?

Sorry fo that assumption, it does say that they are "New to rabbits" in the thread title though...


To the OP:
It would probably be angoras which would be best for collecting wool from.

Start up costs:

Up to about 400 for suitable accomodation
About 20-60 for the actual rabbit (rabbits are social animals and need to live together)
50-100 per rabbit for neutering

Maintenance Costs:

Pellets: about 1 per rabbit per week
Hay: One bale is about 5 and lasts a 3-4 weeks
Vegetables: 3+ per rabbit per week
Bedding/Litter 3 per rabbit per week
VHD Vaccination around 15 per rabbit per year
Myxi Vaccination around 15 per rabbit per year/ six months depending

Vet Costs:

Can run into the thousands. It is illegal to deny a rabbit medical care when it needs it.

petparadise123
04-01-2010, 01:14 PM
Sorry fo that assumption, it does say that they are "New to rabbits" in the thread title though...


To the OP:
It would probably be angoras which would be best for collecting wool from.

Start up costs:

Up to about 400 for suitable accomodation
About 20-60 for the actual rabbit (rabbits are social animals and need to live together)
50-100 per rabbit for neutering

Maintenance Costs:

Pellets: about 1 per rabbit per week
Hay: One bale is about 5 and lasts a 3-4 weeks
Vegetables: 3+ per rabbit per week
Bedding/Litter 3 per rabbit per week
VHD Vaccination around 15 per rabbit per year
Myxi Vaccination around 15 per rabbit per year/ six months depending

Vet Costs:

Can run into the thousands. It is illegal to deny a rabbit medical care when it needs it.

prices are different in the USA/Canada:)

w1lll
04-01-2010, 02:31 PM
prices are different in the USA/Canada:)

http://www.smileyvault.com/albums/basic/smileyvault-slaphead.gif (http://www.smileyvault.com/)

halfpenny
16-01-2010, 04:27 PM
I have to say I'm disappointed to see this thread and people recommending that OP gets some goats instead. Goats/ sheep are equally difficult to keep properly and if a rabbit isn't suitable for a child because she won't look after it for 5-10 years, goats/ sheep can live from 10- 20 years.
Goat wool gets coarser as the goat ages and less desirable, therefore after the age of 5-6 their wool is no longer of any value and the goats are disposed of.

http://www.vegsoc.org/info/clothing.html