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Deelove
13-02-2008, 09:35 PM
http://www.feedem.co.uk/horse-117/horse-stable-accessories-248/elico-horse-haynets-1309-1270_thumb.jpg

Just replying to Beth's thread and had an idea. Does anyone use the horse hay net things for their rabbits? Would this be safe? I was thinking you could hang one so they could just reach the bottom and then could use it to hold a lot of hay and the hay would fall to the bottom as they ate.

The only thing I'd be worried about is a net affect of them getting caught in it if it fell down...

Ben's mum
13-02-2008, 09:38 PM
I'd be worried about them managing to jump up and getting their neck/leg caught in it and doing some serious damage as they fall downwards :?

chloaster
13-02-2008, 09:45 PM
I use them and have never had any problems. I use the ones with small holes when there are small buns or youngsters in the runs.

Sooz
13-02-2008, 09:46 PM
I find youngsters sitting in their hay racks sometimes so I would personally worry about them getting stuck in it.

cavysrock
13-02-2008, 09:52 PM
I'd be worried about them getting their head caught in the holes :?

Jack-Bun
13-02-2008, 09:54 PM
I was going to get one for the buns Playhouse- but when I looked at them, they looked really weak and the holes looked as if they were going to split

Plus I was scared of it falling on the buns?:?

cavysrock
13-02-2008, 09:55 PM
they are certainly not weak, they can stand a horse chewing on them :)

cavysrock
13-02-2008, 09:55 PM
haylage nets would be ok, they have smaller holes than the hay nets :)

chloaster
13-02-2008, 09:57 PM
I loop mine from the rafters in the barn so no possibility of them falling, have a look for the smaller holed ones, they are a lot smaller than the holes in the pic in Deelove's original post - the holes are about 1" square so no chance of youngsters getting caught in them.

Jack-Bun
13-02-2008, 09:59 PM
Does anyone have a link for ne of the nets... I might get one, now I know about them!

:D

cavysrock
13-02-2008, 10:00 PM
www.argos.com
you can get them at tescos aswell,
also online shops like equimix, robinsons (not sure of the links)

Gingypig
13-02-2008, 10:27 PM
I was going to get one for the buns Playhouse- but when I looked at them, they looked really weak and the holes looked as if they were going to split

Plus I was scared of it falling on the buns?:?

I can asure ou they are not weak, have you ever seen a horse pulling at one? they are made from very strong nylon.

As for save for buns? depends on your bun I guess. i used to bring haylage home from the yard in one for the pigs and let them gather round it while running on the patio, but it as very full so they couldn't get in or anything.

xxx

Gingypig
13-02-2008, 10:31 PM
www.robinsons-uk.com is Robinsons the horse superstore

or just google haylage nets or check on ebay.

i have millions of haylage nets, I acquired them over the years!! lol

xxx

Deelove
14-02-2008, 02:43 PM
I loop mine from the rafters in the barn so no possibility of them falling, have a look for the smaller holed ones, they are a lot smaller than the holes in the pic in Deelove's original post - the holes are about 1" square so no chance of youngsters getting caught in them.

I couldn't find a picture on image search. :lol:

Bionic Bunny
20-02-2008, 04:12 PM
I personally would not recommend them for rabbits. I won't use them for horses either. A donkey where I work hung itself on a haynet. Granted it wasn't tied up properly but I wouldn't take the risk. They aren't that great for horses either as they are eating in an unnatural position.

lucy pepsi
20-02-2008, 04:15 PM
I feed my horse from the floor for the reasons stated above!

You can get travel hay nets though that are solid nylon fabric with one big hole in though that might be better for bunny?!

Pipstrel
20-02-2008, 04:31 PM
I'd be concerned about them chewing on the Nylon to be honest and with my buns i'd end up throwing loads away as they only eat it when its fresh :roll: I'd be able to fit a weeks worth of hay in a haynet but they just wouldn't eat it. Smaller amounts and often seems to work for my buns so a big handful in the morning, one when i get home from work and one before I put them to bed :D

chloaster
20-02-2008, 04:42 PM
I couldn't find a picture on image search. :lol:

:rolleyes: I'll take one later for you! ;)

boris
20-02-2008, 10:06 PM
I agree with Bionic Bunny. I have seen horses with the legs caught in them and causing serious harm. So there is no way I would recommend them!

cavysrock
20-02-2008, 10:23 PM
that is why they are hung a certain hight ;) too low and horses can get their legs caught in them, but having them higher up tones their muscles and helps improve their top line :D but that can also be acheived by a hay bar :D you can also 'double up' so it's harder to get the hay out and harder to stick legs, heads etc in :)

boris
20-02-2008, 10:28 PM
I have worked with horses for over 10 years and it doesn't matter how high you tie them as when a horse tugs on it you can loosen the net. Everyone has different ways and its what ever works best for them!

cavysrock
20-02-2008, 10:29 PM
agreed.
but the hoses at the stables i go to all seem fine with hay nets :D

Steph
20-02-2008, 10:31 PM
You also tie a horses hay net on the ring with a quick release type knot so that if a leg should get stuck the net falls to the ground. I have never had a horse get tangled in one and Ive kept horses for 25 years :D

cavysrock
20-02-2008, 10:32 PM
You also tie a horses hay net on the ring with a quick release type knot so that if a leg should get stuck the net falls to the ground. I have never had a horse get tangled in one and Ive kept horses for 25 years :D

at our stables they use a piece of breakable string incase the horse gets caught and it will snap if pulled hard enough :D

Steph
20-02-2008, 10:35 PM
Yep my bale twine is tied onto the ring ;) Then the net onto the twine :D

cavysrock
20-02-2008, 10:36 PM
yeah, that's what it's like at the stables, also attched to a metal loop obviously lol..


here is a picture of a smaller holed haylage net if anyone was wondering
http://www.horseracingtackandsupplies.com/store/sc_images/products/460_thumbnail_image.jpg

rabshan
20-02-2008, 11:34 PM
My horse Ozzie managed to get his leg trapped in his hay net:shock:i found him in the morning looking rather sorry for himself with his leg caught up:cry:
later i watched him and after i had given him his net he kicked out at it with his front leg getting it caught again:shock:after that i scrapped the net and bought him a manger:)

bunny_burrows
21-02-2008, 10:33 AM
that is why they are hung a certain hight ;) too low and horses can get their legs caught in them, but having them higher up tones their muscles and helps improve their top line :D but that can also be acheived by a hay bar :D

Not sure I agree with that.:? Horses are built to graze with their heads down, so having to have their heads high to eat from a hay net is unnatural for them. Hay bars have actually been designed so the horse can eat with his head down, so are different to hay nets. Personally I prefer Smokey to eat his hay loose on the ground, although he has recently been changed to haylage due to his allergies so has to have a net.:?

Honestly I would be way too worried giving one to a rabbit as they could easily get tangled in one - no matter how small the holes are. Better safe than sorry I say.:D

cavysrock
21-02-2008, 10:42 AM
ah rite, eating from lower down improves their topline :oops: i'm sure eating from higher up tones some muscles somewhere??? but then i don't know much about horses :oops: (i know the basics lol:oops:)
at our stables (i know i keep refering to them but i have nothing else to refer to!) they don't feed from the floor as it gets soiled and then thrown away. I always thought haylage was better than hay anyway (shame it smells worse!)
I thought haybars were dangerous anyway, they are fitted onto the wall right? fixed things in stables can cause injury (things like automatic drinking systems and hay racks) at least a hay net breaks away if it gets caught in/on it.
anyway, this is a complete novice trying to work out horses :rolleyes: :oops: