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daplaya
27-12-2007, 02:38 PM
I have had a lop eared rabbit for about 3 months, everything was fine until about a month ago.

The rabbit has started spraying everywhere its all over the wall in the spare room and all over the carpets.

Is there anything that we can do to stop him from doing this? :(

TheGaffer
27-12-2007, 02:39 PM
Getting him neutered will calm down this behaviour

donnamt
27-12-2007, 02:41 PM
i think its time to get his bits chopped off :(

luckily we got Alvin neutured before he started the spraying, hopefully once your buns hormones are removed he will stop the spraying

daplaya
27-12-2007, 02:41 PM
What is the average cost of getting him neutered?

Are rabbits better kept outside?

Thanks for your quick reply

donnamt
27-12-2007, 02:47 PM
it was 56 to get Alvin done, we are in birmingham and it may be cheaper in other areas...

Alvin is a house bunny and is happy... most people on this forum keep thier buns outside and they are happy too..... i think its a personnal choice and as long as they are fed and clean with huge amounts of running space they will be happy :D

CottonMather
27-12-2007, 02:48 PM
rabbits are fine kept indoors and can be litter trained, but this is much easier to do if he is neutered... the cost is usually around 40 for a male. he would need to be kept indoors after the op anyway, so perhaps you could see how he improves once his hormones have died down (around 4-6 weeks after the op.)

daplaya
27-12-2007, 02:50 PM
Thanks for your advice i will look into getting him netured.

He is in a massive cage with a male guinea pig the 2 have been together since they were both 8 weeks old.

Should i get them both neutered then?

P.s sorry for asking all these questions i'm new to this :D

Bavarian Bunny
27-12-2007, 02:55 PM
If your animals have been kept indoors until now, I would keep them indoors until at least the spring. They will not have developed a warm enough winter fur.
It is not a good idea to keep a rabbit and a guinea pig in the same cage. Sometimes they can become best friends, but their behaviour is very different, and it can happen that the rabbit injures the guinea pig. Does your rabbit hump the guinea pig a lot? Is the guinea pig a boy, too? I would definitely get them both neutered, and if you see any signs of fighting, keep them in separate cages.
Hope that helps.

daplaya
27-12-2007, 02:58 PM
If your animals have been kept indoors until now, I would keep them indoors until at least the spring. They will not have developed a warm enough winter fur.
It is not a good idea to keep a rabbit and a guinea pig in the same cage. Sometimes they can become best friends, but their behaviour is very different, and it can happen that the rabbit injures the guinea pig. Does your rabbit hump the guinea pig a lot? Is the guinea pig a boy, too? I would definitely get them both neutered, and if you see any signs of fighting, keep them in separate cages.
Hope that helps.

In actual fact the guinea pig humps the rabbit he just sits about. They are both boys but have only ever fought once.

They follow each other about all the time its funny to see

Beebop
27-12-2007, 03:10 PM
Hi and welcome to forum!:D

My vet charges 40 for neutering as well. Guinea pigs mature many weeks before rabbits, so that explains why the pig was humping your rabbit, but the tables may be about to turn. Your rabbit is now spraying so I assume hes just hitting sexual maturity and therefore you may notice he becomes more aggressive and territorial, and therefore is likely to take it out on the guinea pig. :(

Also, buns have very powerful back legs and an accidental kick can easily break your piggies ribs. You'd be best to neuter them both and get them a female from a rescue who you can bond them to after they have recovered. Being social they'll love having company of the same species.:D

Both the Rabbit welfare society and the RSPCA all reccomend they are no longer housed together.;)

Good luck, and if you have any piccies we'd love to see them in the gallery!:wave:

Oh and to find local rescues, heres a few links:

www.rabbitrehome.org.uk
www.guineapigrehome.org.uk

Azraelm
27-12-2007, 03:12 PM
Getting the rabbit neutered will stop him spraying.

It is not as routine to neuter guinea pigs, and not necessarily needed. I would seperate them, especially if they've had a fight. If the guinea pig is humping the rabbit he could get annoyed and could kick the guinea pig, injuring or killing it. Get them both a friend of their own kind- best match for a neutered male rabbit is a spayed female, and you can match the guinea pig with a younger boar.

Try your local rescue or rabbit rehome.

TheGaffer
28-12-2007, 12:09 AM
Sorry to go on about this when others have mentioned it but please please do not keep your rabbit and guinea pig together.

They are two entirely different species of animal and have very different needs, namely they need a different diet. Guineas need high levels of vit c because they can't synthesise their own.

They cannot communicate with each other, as they communicate in completely different ways.

Rabbits can accidently kick guinea pigs and cause horrendous injuries or death. One of my rescue pigs has hip problems from being humped by a rabbit!

The best combination is neutered male/spayed female rabbits and then two male guinea pigs can live together quite well. Guinea pigs can also be neutered and then bonded with females too.

Please think about the advise you've been given,

Nicola

Sooz
28-12-2007, 12:12 AM
..... and one of my rabbits is half bald from being barbered by a guinea pig and obese from eating high protein guinea pig food.

TheGaffer
28-12-2007, 12:21 AM
..... and one of my rabbits is half bald from being barbered by a guinea pig and obese from eating high protein guinea pig food.

gosh yes I'd not thought about poor Inca

Jayms_fallen_angel
28-12-2007, 12:43 AM
Oh I'm so sad you keep a bun and a piggy together and as they're both friends now it would be cruel to seperate them, but just take a look at your bunnies back feet, see when he runs and kicks out his back feet? Feel the power behind that and then feel how delicate your piggies bones are. Even though they're best friends if your piggy is behind your bun when he runs and kickes out as bunnies do, your piggy is dead. The bunnies back feet will shatter your piggies skull.

My two are house bunnies and I would never put them outside. They make such great house pets. My mum thinks Charm thinks he's a house dog. The only thing with indoors buns is they may eat furnature and curtains and wires.

Neutering reduces the hormone levels. Hormone levels are what makes your bunny aggressive, possessive and randy. So neutering makes them tamer.

TheGaffer
28-12-2007, 01:37 AM
Oh I'm so sad you keep a bun and a piggy together and as they're both friends now it would be cruel to seperate them,

i don't agree, I've seperated 2 lots of rabbit and guinea pig pairs now and they are fine and much happier when they get paired with their own species. I don't see anything cruel about it:?

Sooz
28-12-2007, 01:44 AM
i don't agree, I've seperated 2 lots of rabbit and guinea pig pairs now and they are fine and much happier when they get paired with their own species. I don't see anything cruel about it:?

I have to agree with you Nicola.

Its a point that has long irritated me on the RWA literature where it states not to seperate a happily cohabiting pair. The problem with that is they were all happily cohabiting at one point, its only when someone gets hurt that people feel they have to act.

Then of course its often too late :?

capel
28-12-2007, 03:05 AM
I agree with the posts about seperating co-habiting buns and piggies. When Karen and I rescued nia she was living with 2 guinea pigs. The owner let us have her on the condition that we did not seperate them as when she'd tried before, Nia "pined" for them. It looked to both of us as if Nia had been bullied by one,or both, piggies: it looked as though they had been chewing on her tail and eartips and she was very,very nervous and had that fightened look in her eyes. We split them as soon as we got them. Karen took the piggies and I took Nia. She certainly gave no signs of pining and over the next week settled down and showed herself to be a very happy sociable little bunny. So please...seperate them. If you want to keep your rabbit outside then you should try to find him a companion after he's been neutered.