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bunny babe
16-12-2007, 07:32 PM
Does this mean that there is too much calcium in the diet? They do not always pass this but do sometimes so I just want to check if this is "normal" or if I should worry.

Thier main diet is:
Bunny Basics Pellets - half bowl between each day
Spring cabbage - 1 leaf each per day
Half small carrot - each per day
Kale - occasionally
Parsley - occasionally
Other herbs - occasionally
Grass - free range daily
Hay - daily (although one of them will not eat it no matter what I try)

Indiechic
16-12-2007, 07:33 PM
They are like humans, if its not constant, then it shouldnt be a problem. what do you feed them on?

if it is constant, then take a serious look at thier diet xx

abbymarysmokey
16-12-2007, 07:41 PM
Chalky wee is OK as long as it's not thick or gritty (kinda like toothpaste).

Wee from a healthy rabbit leaves a white chalky residue when it dries.

Signs that a rabbit has bladder problems are:Straining to urinate, blood in the urine, loss of litterbox training (if previously good), and a wet bottom/back legs.

Amy

bunny babe
16-12-2007, 08:04 PM
Thanks, I was a bit worried as one of my rabbits had to have his bladder flushed out last Christmas Day!! We have totally changed his diet since then but I just wanted to check with you guys to make sure that this is normal.

In fact my vet did start to recommend calcium supplement as he said the buns teeth was lacking but then I reminded him of my problem last Christmas and then he advised against the supplement. It is so hard to get a happy medium with these bunsters!!

I also feed carrot tops and broccoli as treats but know these are high in calcium so not too often.

abbymarysmokey
16-12-2007, 08:11 PM
What was the urine like of your rabbit that had bladder problems? Mine had very dilute watery urine. It was almost as though she was unable to excrete the calcium normally like my other rabbits do. :(

Amy

bunny babe
16-12-2007, 08:31 PM
To be honest, I can't remember. I don't recall seeing any changes when it did happen - he was OK when I let him out and 2 hours later he was in pain. However we did have a problem with him urinating and getting scald the previous few months and we could not find out why. He was given antibiotics in case it was an infection. We did end up putting it down to him pining over his parnter he lost at the end of May last year as they were very close.

When he did have his bladder flushed the vet took an X-ray and there was a "mass" in his bladder which he said was strange but we have not had problems since then "touches wood"...

So it seems then that if it is "chalky" then this means that the excess calcium is passing through OK (as long as it is not like "toothpaste"). I have learnt so much in such a short time of joining this site. Thanks to everyone for their help.

Jack's-Jane
16-12-2007, 08:48 PM
To be honest, I can't remember. I don't recall seeing any changes when it did happen - he was OK when I let him out and 2 hours later he was in pain. However we did have a problem with him urinating and getting scald the previous few months and we could not find out why. He was given antibiotics in case it was an infection. We did end up putting it down to him pining over his parnter he lost at the end of May last year as they were very close.

When he did have his bladder flushed the vet took an X-ray and there was a "mass" in his bladder which he said was strange but we have not had problems since then "touches wood"...

So it seems then that if it is "chalky" then this means that the excess calcium is passing through OK (as long as it is not like "toothpaste"). I have learnt so much in such a short time of joining this site. Thanks to everyone for their help.


If the chalky wee feels gritty when you run your finger through it I would probably avoid feeding high calcium food such as Alfalfa, Kale, Broccoli, Carrot Tops, Spring Greens etc

Janex

bunny babe
16-12-2007, 09:06 PM
Jane thank for that - I will try the "running my finger through" test, ugh! Did not realise that spring greens were high in calcium.

What veg is lower in calcium in case I need to reduce it?

abbymarysmokey
16-12-2007, 09:06 PM
So it seems then that if it is "chalky" then this means that the excess calcium is passing through OK (as long as it is not like "toothpaste"). I have learnt so much in such a short time of joining this site. Thanks to everyone for their help.

Yes, in my totally unqualified opinion, I'd say that some calcium deposits are desirable, but not too much.

I have no idea whether there is any medical research to back this up tho', just from my observations of my rabbits.

Amy

ecudc
16-12-2007, 10:55 PM
I'm trying to cut down on the spring green too which were my previous staple. I'm using instead romany lettuce, still giving a bit of spring green & bumping up the celery, raddish, carrots & brocolli. I think sprouts are reasonably OK too for a green veg.

ecudc
16-12-2007, 11:05 PM
I found this:


http://carrotcafe.com/f/calevel.html


According to this

Mung beans (?)
Cauliflower
Swiss chard...which is really easy to grow...we have some in the garden
Endive
Lettuce
Peas
peppers
Corriander
Savoy cabbage
Raddish
Kolrabi
Spinach
Carrots

are all quite low.....celey was higher than I thought.

maybe I'll ditch some celery for mangetout

bunny babe
16-12-2007, 11:37 PM
Interesting... I thought spinach was high so stopped giving this and also savoy cabbage. Never tried them with radish, thought that was strong tasting or is it just the leaves that you feed them?

What is swiss chard and where can I get it? I have got some "grow your own" barley/oat grass from Hay Experts and they love that.

ecudc
17-12-2007, 09:48 AM
If I'm growing the raddish I give them the whole thing but otherwise the bulbs from the supermarket. They seem to like it.

Spinach you shouldn't feed every day, not because of calcium but because of the oxilates (which stop you being able to absorb protein I think)....its the same stuff which is in rubbarb leaves although rubbarb leaves have a much higher % and are deadly. I think it's why both spinach & rubbard make your tounge furry.

You can't buy swiss chard usually you have to grow it. It's really easy to grow though. You probably need about 6 plants for occasional treats for your rabbits and yourself. Sow in feburary in pots on a windowsill & plant out in march. Do another sowing in june time & you will have chard all year round as long as you give it some protection.

There is normal swiss chard (white) ruby chard (deep red very pretty) and bright lights (a mix).